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Full text of "University of Massachusetts Board of Trustees records, 1836-2010"




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579 



THE MASSACHUSETTS AGRICULTURAL COLLEGE 

MINUTES OF THE ANNUAL MEETING OF THE BOARD OF TRUSTEES 
State House, Boston, January 13, 1931 

The meeting convened at 9:30 A.M. with Vice- 
President Ellis presiding. 

PRESENT: Trustees Ellis, Chandler, Preston, Russell, 
Gerrett, Dewey, Griggs, Gilbert, Richardson, 
Bacon, Frost; Director Sievers, Treasurer 
Kenney .. 

The following is the call for the meeting: 

December 31, 1930 

To the Board of Trustees of 

The Massachusetts Agricultural College 

Gentlemen: 

Pursuant to the provisions of the By-Laws, the annua: 
meeting of the Board of Trustees of the Massachusetts 
Agricultural College is hereby called to convene at Room 
136, State House, Boston, Massachusetts, on Tuesday, 
January 13, 1931 at 9:30 A.M. 



Respectfully yours, 
Robert D. Hawley 
Secretary 

The minutes of the preceding meeting were 
approved without reading. 

The Vice-President appointed Trustees Gerrett, 
Richardson and Bacon as a special committee to wait upon 
the Governor and to inform him that the Trustees of the 
Massachusetts Agricultural College were in annual session. 

The Vice-President appointed Trustees Preston, 
Frost and Chandler as a special committee to present 
nominations for officers and committees for the ensuing 
year. 



Call 






Minutes 



Committee to 
wait upon the 
Governor 



Nominating 
Committee 



580 



TRUSTEE 



Resignations 



Appointments 



Chemistry 
adjustments 



THE MASSACHUSETTS AGRICULTURAL COLLEGE 

Director Sievers, Chairman of the Faculty Ad- 
ministrative Committee, reported the following resignation$ 
and new appointments in the staff at the College which 
have occurred since the last report to the Trustees. 

RESIGNATIONS 

Joseph L. Kelley, Technical Assistant in Cranberry Studie 

October 31, 1950 
Mrs. Elizabeth S. Robertson, Instructor in Spanish and 

French, December 31, 1930 

APPOINTMENTS 

Walter S. Eisenmenger, Research Professor of Agronomy, 
January 1, 1931, $3,600 

Clarence H. Parsons, Assistant Professor of Animal Hus- 
bandry and Superintendent of Farm, January 15, 1931, 
$2,7S0& house. 

Donald E. Stofflet, Instructor in Spanish and French, 
January 1, 1931, $1,740 

It was 

VOTED : To approve the action of the President in 

accepting the resignations as reported above 
and in making new appointments as indicated. 

The Secretary reported the following adjustments 
which have been made in the Department of Chemistry to 
take care of the work during the six months' leave of 
absence without pay which Professor Chamberlain, Head of 
the Department, is taking beginning January 1, 1931. Dr. 
M. E. Cupery, formerly Instructor, has been appointed 
Acting -Prof essor. Mr. E. M. Parrott, formerly Laboratory 
Assistant, has been appointed Instructor In Mr. Cupery T s 
place. Mr. 3. C. Redmon has been appointed Laboratory 
Assistant in Mr. Parrott' s position. At the end of his 
present temporary appointment, Mr. Cupery expects to 
resign from the institution. 




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THE MASSACHUSETTS AGRICULTURAL COLLEGE 

Director Sievers presented a request from Mr. 

W. H. Thies, Extension Specialist in Pomology, that he 

be granted a leave of absence for six months beginning 

September 1, 1931 for professional improvement under the 

provisions of the plan adopted by the Board of Trustees. 

The request also asked for permission to extend this 

leave of absence for three additional months without pay 

in order that Mr. Thies may complete a full year's work 

for his Doctor's degree at Cornell University. It was 

VOTED; To approve -the request of Professor Thies 
for a leave of absence for professional 
improvement . 

The Secretary presented the report from the 
Trustee Committee on Buildings and Grounds. This Com- 
mittee has approved the action of the Executive Committee 
of the Board in recommending to the Commission on Ad- 
ministration & Finance that the proposed Administration 
Building for the College be included in the emergency 
budget now being considered. The Committee also approved 
the action of the Executive Committee in requesting 
Senator Walsh to ascertain the possibility of securing 
Federal appropriations for the construction of a build- 
ing upon the campus to house the Northeastern Forestry 
Experiment Station. It is understood that the Budget 
Commissioner has approved the inclusion in this year's 
budget of an item of $175,000 for the reconstruction and 
fireproofing of the College Library 



581 






Professor 
Thies' 
leave of 
absence 



Administra- 
tion 
Building 



Forestry 
Building 



582 



TRUSTEE 



Crabtree 
Bequest 



Report of 
Treasurer 



Report of 
President 



Action of 
Committees 



Election of 
Officers 



THE MASSACHUSETTS AGRICULTURAL COLLEGE 

Director Sievers reported concerning the status 

of the Lotta Crabtree Bequest stating that apparently the 

Trustees of the Estate are very nearly ready to make 

grants under the provisions of the Will. It was 

VOTED ; That Director Sievers take President 

Thatcher* s place during his absence as a 
member of the special committee previously 
appointed to represent the Trustees in 
negotiations concerning this Bequest. 

The annual report of the Treasurer was presentee 

with the recommendation of the Finance Committee that it 

be accepted and adopted. Upon motion duly made and 

seconded, it was 

VOTED ; To adopt the annual report of the Treasurer, 

The annual report of the President was read in 

his absence by the Secretary and it was 

VOTED ; To accept and adopt the report. 

It was 

VOTED ; That all actions taken bj the Committees of 
the Trustees during the year which have not 
been subsequently approved by the Board of 
Trustees, be hereby approved. 

The Nominating Committee reported its recommen- 
dations for officers and committees of the Board of 
Trustees for the ensuing year and the Secretary was in- 
structed to cast one ballot by which it was unanimously 

VOTED ; To elect the following officers and com- 
mittees of the Board of Trustees for the 
ensuing year. 



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THE MASSACHUSETTS AGRICULTURAL COLLEGE 



President, His Excellency, Governor Joseph 3. 
Vice-President, George H. Ellis 
Secretary, Robert D. Hawley 
Auditor, Frank Gerrett 



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Committee on Finance 

Frank Gerrett, Chairman 
Nathaniel I. Bowditch 
George H. Ellis 

John Chandler 



Harold L. Frost 
Davis R. Dewey 
Charles H. Preston 



Committee on Faculty and Program of Study 



Davis R. Dewey, Chairman 
James F. Bacon 
Payson Smith 

John Chandler 



John F. Gannon 
Arthur W. Gilbert 
Sarah Louise Arnold 



Committee on Agriculture 

Nathaniel I. Bowditch„ Chairman Arthur W. 
Carlton D. Richardson- George H. 

Frank Gerrett 

Committee on Horticulture 



Gilbert 
Ellis 



Harold L. Frost, Chairman 
Howard S. Russell 
John Chandler 



Philip F. Whitmore 
Charles H. Preston 
Fred D. Griggs 



Committee on Experiment Station 



583 



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Charles H. Preston, Chairman 
Arthur W. Gilbert 
Howard S. Russell 



Carlton J. Richardson 
Philip F. Vvhitmore 
Harold L. Frost 



Committee on Buildings and G rounds 



George H. Ellis, Chairman 
Frank Gerrett 
Carlton D. Richardson 



Charles H. Preston 
Philip F. Whitmore 
James F. Bacon 



Committee on Extension Service 



John Chandler, Chairman 
Nathaniel I. Bowditch 
Davis R. Dewey 

Arthur W. Gilbert 



Fred D. Griggs 
John F. Gannon 
Sarah Louise Arnold 



Executive Committee 

George H. Ellis, Chairman Philip F. Whitmore 

James F. Bacon 



584 



TRUSTEE 



Dr. Gannon - 
felicitations 



THE MASSACHUSETTS AGRICULTURAL COLLEGE 



George H. 



Auditing, Committee 



Ellis, Chairman Charles H 
Nathaniel I. Bowditch 



Preston 



President 
Thatcher - 
felicitations 



Governor Ely 



A letter from Trustee Gannon was read to the 

Board in which he expressed his regret at being unable 

to attend the annual meeting because of ill health and 

in which he expressed all good wishes to the Trustees. 

It was 

VOTED ; To instruct the Secretary to send the greet- 
ings and kind regards of the members of the 
Board of Trustees to Dr. Gannon and to ex- 
press to him their best wishes for his 
speedy recovery. 

Upon motion duly made and seconded, It was 

VOTED ; That the Chairman be asked to send to Presi- 
dent Thatcher a message indicating the keen int 
interest of the Trustees in his health and 
their appreciation of his effective service. 

At this point, His Excellency, Governor Ely 
attendsathe meeting and was informed of his election as 
President of the Board of Trustees. The Governor ex- 
pressed his interest In the College and his hope to be 
helpful in the administration of Its affairs. There was 
an informal discussion of the building program of the 
College and of the proposal to change the name to 
Massachusetts State College. 

The meeting adjourned at 12:20 P.M. 



/?i< o.M cX6^ 



Vice 
President 




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TRUSTEE 



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THE MASSACHUSETTS AGRICULTURAL COLLEGE 

MINUTES OF SEMI - ANNUAL MEETING OF THE BOARD OF TRUSTEES 
Presidents Office, Amherst, June 15, 1931 

The meeting convened at 9:00 A.M. with Vice- 
President Ellis presiding. 

PRESENT : Trustees Ellis, Preston, Richardson, 
Gannon, Griggs, Chandler, Whitmore, 
Russell, Gerrett, Frost, Gilbert; 
President Thatcher, Treasurer Kenney, 
Professor Sievers. 

The following is the call for the meeting: 

May 27, 1951 

To the Board of Trustees of 
The Massachusetts State College 

Gentlemen: 

In accordance with the provisions of the By-Laws 
the semi-annual meeting of the Board of Trustees of 
Massachusetts State College is hereby called to convene 
at the Office of the President of the College at Amherst 
^at nine o f clock, Monday morning, June 15, 1931. Matters 
for consideration will be the granting of degrees and 
such other business as properly may be presented. 

Respectfully yours, 

Robert D. Hawley 

Secretary 

The minutes of the preceding meeting were 

approved without reading. 

114 candidates were recommended by the Faculty 

to receive the Bachelor of Science degree. These were 

as follows: 



585 



Call 



Raymond Clayton Allen 
Elizabeth Evans Barry 
Leonard Bartlett, Jr.- 
Nelson Edgar Bartsch 
Evelyn Armstrong Beaman 
Walter Twichell Bonney 
William Ezra Bosworth, Jr. 
Bruce Ely Bottomly 
Sara Elizabeth Bradley 
John Hapgood Brooks, 3rd 



Alfred Alexander Brown 
Wilber Francis Buck 
Catharine Annette Burnham 
John Calvi 

Ann Jocelyn Campbell 
Henry Dunphe Carpenter 
Alan William Chadwick 
Winifred Lee Chenoweth 
Marjorie Clarkson 
John Paul Costello 



Minutes 



586 



TRUSTEE 



B. S. 
Degree 



THE MASSACHUSETTS AGRICULTURAL COLLEGE 



Lewis Bohlin Cucinotta 
Wynton Reid Dangelmayer 
Arthur Richards Daniels 
Herbert Daniel Darling 
Arnold Mearns Davis 
George Merrill Davis 
Richard William Davis 
Iris Norma DeFalco 
Anna Katherine Digney 
Frank Taylor Douglass 
Cora Gennette Dyer 
George White Field 
Paul Richard FitzGerald 
Richard Arthur Fraser 
Newell William Frey 
Thelma Selene Friedrich 
Edmund Locke Frost 
Constantine Joseph Gilgut 
Raymond Eldred Goodrich 
Jeane Anne Gordon 
Joseph William Gorman 
Albert Hugh Gower 
Janet Anne Griffith 
John Robert Guenard 
Joseph John Gula 
Walter Breed Hacker 
Harry Mason Hanks, Jr. 
Emory Barton Hastings 
Ernest Littlefield Hayes 
Francis Martin Hines 
Alfred Harold Holway 
Arthur Clement Marriott 
Erik Alfred Johnson 
Lawrence Arthur Jones 
Philip Wadsworth Kimball 
Marc Nesmith King 
Ralph Folger Kneeland,Jr. 
Margaret Eleanore Koerber 
Francis Bleakie Lamb 
John Cheney Lawrence 
Gertrude Leah LeClair 
Charles Lunt Little 
Ifussell Dudley Loar 
Evelyn May Lyman 
Charles Weikko Manty 
Mary Moore Marshall 
Frank Ford Mason, Jr. 

It was 



John William McGuckian 
Richard Potter McKeen 
Gertrude Alice Mead 
Beatrice Florentine Meyer 
Marjorie Monk 
Norman Myrick 
Clyde Woodbury Nash 
David Mitchell Nason 
Frieda Brita Norell 
John Warren Northcott, Jr. 
George West Oliver 
Gertrude Keith Pierce 
Martin Peter Plantinga 
Francis Civille Pray 
Louis Pyenson 
Anna-May Reuter 
Robert Colbert Rooney 
Theodore Rubin 
Grace Shirley Russell 
Ruth Elizabeth Scott 
Frank Robert Shav/ 
Ernest Gordon Smith 
Paul Augustus Smith 
John Somes 

Pauline Anna Spiewak 
Leon Stanisiewski 
Errol Burton Stevenson 
Herbert Tilden Stoddard 
Robert Emerson Stuart 
Leopold Hanzo Takahashi 
Souren Markar Tashjian 
Johnson Don Cecil Tiffany 
Frederick Sherman Troy 
Robert Barclay Tucker 
Shirley Upton 

Marguerite Veronica Vichules 
Lionel Lewis Vincent 
Cecil Hardy Lewis Wahlgren 
Allen Johnson Warren 
Allen Sherman West, Jr. 
Edwin Maurice Westendarp 
Edwin T heron White 
Frederick Kinsley Whittum 
Inez Wilhelmina Williams 
James Joseph Woods, Jr. 
Denise Wright 
Alwyn Frederick Yeatman 



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VOTED ; To confer the degree of Bachelor of Science 
upon the 114 members of the Class of 1931 
as listed above. 



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TRUSTEE 



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THE MASSACHUSETTS AGRICULTURAL COLLEGE 

Upon the recommendation of the Faculty, it was 

VOTED: To confer the degree of Bachelor of Vo- 
cational Agriculture upon John Burnham, 
Carl Gustaf Holm, Lawrence Moody Shepard 
of the Class of 1931. 

Upon the recommendation of the Faculty, it was 

VOTED : To confer the degree of Bachelor of Land- 
scape Architecture upon Elizabeth Anne 
Lynch who received the Bachelor of Science 
degree with the Class of 1929. 

Upon the recommendation of the Faculty of the 

Graduate School, it was 

V OTE D: To confer the degree of Master of Science 
upon the following: 



Marjorie Elise Beeman 
Oscar Boisvert 
Max Bovarnick 
Morton Harding Cassidy 
John Albert Clague 



William Albert Cowing 
Richard Carol Foley 
Elizabeth Anne Lynch 
Guy Thelin 



Upon the recommendation of the Faculty of the 

Graduate School, it was 

VOTED : To confer the degree of Doctor of Philosophy 
upon the following: 



Samuel Henry DeVault 
Clayton Leon Farrar 



Ezekiel Rivnay 
Harold Henry Shepard 



Upon the recommendation of the Faculty, it was 

VOTED : To confer the degree, Doctor of Science, 

honoris causa, upon Charles Sumner Howe of 
the Class 1878 and upon Joseph L. Hills of 
the Class of 1831 

President Thatcher reported the loss from the 
Faculty of Charles H. Thompson, Professor of Horticulture 
whose death occurred on January 23, 1931. 

The President reported the following resigna- 
tions from the Faculty: 



587 



B.V.A. 
degree 



B.L.A. 
degree 



M.S. 
degree 



Ph.D. 
degree 



Honorary 
degrees 



Professor 
Thompson' s 
death 



588 



TRUSTEE 



Resignations 



Professor 

Blundell 

appointed 



New 
Appointments 



THE MASSACHUSETTS AGRICULTURAL COLLEGE 

Robert P. Canis, Instructor in Botany, June 30, 1931 

Frank C, Grannis, Assistant Professor of Zoology, 
August 31, 1931 

William R. Phinney, Instructor in English, 
August 31, 1931 

Marion L« Tucker, Assistant Professor of Home Economics, 
August 31, 1951 

Kenneth E. Wright, Assistant Research Professor of Dairy- 
ing, September 15, 1931 

It was 

VOTED ; To approve these resignations as listed 
above. 

President Thatcher nominated Mr. Lyle L. 

Blundell as Professor of Horticulture at a salary of 

$3480 per year to be effective September 1, 1931. This 

appointment is to fill the vacancy caused by the death v 

of Professor Thompson. It was 

VOTED; To elect Mr, Blundell as Professor of 

Horticulture in accordance with the Presi- 
dent's recommendation. 

The following new appointments were reported 

by the President; 

Lyle L. Blundell, Professor of Horticulture, 

September 1, 1931, $3480 
Richard C. Foley, Instructor in Animal Husbandry, 

May 1, 1931, $2040 
Constantine J. Gilgut, Instructor in Botany, July 1, 1931 

11000 
Mary Pozzi, Assistant Extension Specialist in Home 

Economics, February 1, 1931, $2700 
Joseph R. Rogers, Jr., Instructor in Physical Education, 

May 4, 1931, $1800 
Melvin H. Taube, Assistant Professor of Physical 

Education, September 1, 1931, $2220 ($3500) 
James E. Thigpen, Research Assistant in Farm Management, 

$145 per month. Temporary: for one year, 

September 1, 1931 
Robert E. Young, Assistant Research Professor of 

Vegetable Gardening, June 1, 1931, $2400 
Felicia Zimnoski, Laboratory Assistant, Poultry Disease 

Elimination Law, September 1, 1931, $1200 

It was 

VOTED : To approve the new appointments as reported 
by the President and listed above. 



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THE MASSACHUSETTS AGRICULTURAL COLLEGE 

The President presented the list of reappoint- 
ments and salary increases for the next year and it was 

VOTED : To approve the reappointments and salary in- 
creases as reported by the President. 

Due to reassignment of Federal Funds for the 
support of the Extension Service, there has been added to 
Federal appropriations to this State a sum of approxi- 
mately |13,000 to be available for the first time for the 
fiscal year beginning July 1, next. In accordance with 
the recommendation of the Director of the Extension Ser- 
vice, it was 

VOTED : To approve the establishment of four new 
positions to be supported by this addi- 
tional Federal money. These are 

Extension Specialist in Farm Management 
Assistant Extension Editor 
Assistant Horticultural Specialist 
Assistant Specialist in Home Furnishing 

Upon the request of Assistant Professor 

Harrison, it was 

VOTED : To approve the postponement of his leave of 

absence granted at the last semi-annual meet- 
ing and to authorize his leave on the pro- 
fessional improvement basis from July 1, 1931 
to January 1, 1932. 

Because of illness in her family, Miss May E. 
Foley, Assistant Extension Specialist in Nutrition, re- 
quested that the leave of absence granted to her at the 
last semi-annua^ meeting of the Board be cancelled without 
prejudice. It was 

VOTED : To approve this request. 



589 



Salarv 
if creases 



Extension 
Service - 
New 
positions 



Professor 

Harrison* s 
leave 



Miss Foley T s 
leave 



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5 



TRUSTEE 



Mr. 

Nodine 1 s 
leave 



Professor 
Monahan' s 
leave 



Professor 
Mighell' s 
leave 



Dining 

Hall 

rebate 



Dining 

Hall 

rate 



THE MASSACHUSETTS AGRICULTURAL COLLEGE 

Request was received from Mr, E. H. Nodine, 
Assistant State Club Leader, that he be granted leave of 
absence for professional improvement from February 1 to 
July 1, 1952. It was 

VOTED : To approve this request. 

Request was received from Professor W. G. 

Monahan, Extension Specialist in Poultry Husbandry, for 

leave of absence for professional improvement from 

June 15 to December 15, 1952 with the understanding that 

an additional leave of six months without pay may be 

taken if desired. It was 

VOTED; To approve this request with the under- 
standing that final agreement between 
Professor Monahan and the College adminis- 
tration as to the duration of the leave 
will be reached before any leave is taken. 

Upon his request, it was 

VOTED: To grant to Assistant Research Professor 

Mighell a leave of absence without pay for 
the purpose of graduate study for one year 
beginning October 1, 1951, 

Treasurer Kenney reported fhe financial 

condition of the Dining Hall indicating a net balance 

for the business of the year just closed of approximately 

|17,000, Upon his recommendation, it was 

VOTED: To authorize the Treasurer to rebate to 

students who have paid fixed weekly board 
during the past year at the rate of seventy- 
five cents per week. 

It was 

VOTED : To authorize the rate of $7.00 per week 

for board at the Dining Hall for next year. 



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TRUSTEE 



THE MASSACHUSETTS AGRICULTURAL COLLEGE 

Upon the recommendation of the Treasurer, it was 

VOTED : To authorize a general laboratory fee of 

$4,00 per term to be effective next year in 
place of the various laboratory fees hereto- 
fore charged. 

It was 

VOTED ; To authorize the Treasurer to change the 

seal of the College to correspond with the 
new name, Massachusetts State College, 

A petition was received bearing the names of 

246 students asking that Military drill be made voluntary 

at the College. It was 

VOTED ; That action upon this petition be postponed 
until a later meeting with the understand- 
ing that any recommendations which the 
Faculty may wish to make to the Trustees in 
the meantime will be welcome. 

A report concerning the Lotta Agricultural 

Fund was made by Dr. Gilbert. Approximately $30,000 is 

now available for loans and three such loans have already 

been made. It is anticipated that approximately $20,000 

more will become available each year with the probability 

that the present principal fund will increase with the 

maturity of other bequests made by Miss Crabtree. It 

was 

VOTED ; That all official certification and 

recommendation by the College of candidates 

for loans be made by the President of the 
College. 

The President announced the gift of slightly 

more than $5000 from Dr. Joel E. Goldthwait to be known 

as the "Vincent Goldthwait Memorial Loan Fund". It was 

VOTED; To accept this gift with appreciation. 



591 



General 

Laboratory 

fee 



Seal 



Military 

drill 

petition 



Lotta 
Crabtree 
Recommenda- 
tions 



Goldthwait 
Gift 



592 



TRUSTEE 



Profe?^or 
Drain 1 s 
hearing 



Northeastern 



THE MASSACHUSETTS AGRICULTURAL COLLEGE 

A written request for a hearing in the matter 
of his reappointment as Assistant Professor of Pomology 
for next year was received from Brooks D. Drain and he 
was invited to appear before the Board. He made a state- 
ment of his understanding of the situation and answered 
numerous questions asked by different members of the 
Board, The Trustees also listened to such witnesses as 
he presented. He was asked by the Chairman if he had 
presented all of the matters which he wished to have con- 
sidered and replied in the affirmative and retired from 
the room. It was unanimously 

VOTED? That the action of the President of the 

College in not reappointing Assistant Pro- 
fessor Drain for the next year beginning 
September 1 be confirmed. 

The President described to the Trustees the 

problem which has arisen Of providing adequate quarters 

for the Northeastern Forest Experiment Station in view of 

large increases in its staff. It is apparent that it will 



Forest Exper 

iment Stationbe impossible for this College to continue indefinitely 

Quarters 

to provide adequate quarters for this rapidly growing 

organization. He suggested that such temporary arrange- 
ments as may be possible be made and a definite under- 
standing reached with the Director of the Station as to 
how long it may be necessary for the College to provide 
facilities for it. It was 

VOTED ; That it is the opinion of the Trustees that 
it will be impossible for this College to 
permanently provide adequate quarters for 
this Forest Station and the Committee on 
Buildings & Grounds was authorized to make 
suCh temporary arrangements for housing the 
Station as may be possible. 



§ 



TRUSTEE 



# 



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THE MASSACHUSETTS AGRICULTURAL COLLEGE 



Upon the recommendation of the Treasurer, it was 

VOTED : To authorise and to instruct the Treasurer, 
F. C. Kenney, to secure the registration of 
all of the bonds now held for investment in 
the Trust Fund of the College under the 
following conditions: Such bonds as are 
interchangeable between fully registered and 
coupon bearer bonds are to be changed into 
fully registered bonds. Such bonds as are 
not fully interchangeable are to be regis- 
tered as to principal only and the Treasurer 
is hereby empowered to sign and execute any 
necessary documents to complete this vote. 

It was 

VOTED: To hold a special meeting of the Board of 
Trustees in Boston on September 50, next, 
for the purpose of considering the budget 
for the next year and such other matters as 
properly may be presented and that this 
meeting may be preceded by such Committee 
meetings as seem necessary. 

The following communication was received from 



593 



Adelphia, Student Honorary Society: 



Kappa Sigma House 
Amherst, Mass. 
May 25, 1931 



Mr. George H. Ellis, Chairman 
1245 Commonwealth Ave., 
West Newton, Mass. 

Dear Mr. Ellis: 

At the recent student forum, conducted by Adelphia, 
a vote of thanks was accorded the trustees on behalf of 
the student body for the work your group did in changing 
the name of our college. 

It is our wish that you convey our appreciation of 
the work done to the trustees at your next meeting, and 
in addition I extend the heartiest appreciation of 
Adelphia. 

Very sincerely yours, 

/s/ Allen S. West, Jr. 

Secretary of Adelphia 



Bond 
Registration 



September 
meeting 



Adelphia 
Communica- 
tion 



594 



TRUSTEE 



Scope of 
College 



THE MASSACHUSETTS AGRICULTURAL COLLEGE 

Mr. Griggs asked if any recent statement had 

been authorized by the Trustees as representing their 

opinion of the scope of the College, Following a 

discussion of this question, it was 

VOTED : That a statement be prepared by the Finance 
Committee of the Board and presented to the 
full Board at the meeting on September 30 
for consideration. 

The meeting adjourned at 12:00 M. 



» 




Mr(3Cto% 



Vice 
President 




ecretary 



• 




♦ 



TRUSTEE 



595 



THE MASSACHUSETTS AGRICULTURAL COLLEGE 



SCHEDULE OF SALARY INCREASES TO BECOME EFFECTIVE 



SEPTEMBER 1, 1951 



Name 

Hawley, R.D. 

Alley, A.J. 

Emery, G.E. 

Grybko, J.E. 

Woodbury, G.C. 

Bukoski, A.E. 

Kittredge, J.F. 

Honnay, II. E. 

Brownell, D.E. 

Dolloff, B.E. 

Blaisdell, I.R. 

Shea, H.J. 

Lindsey, A.H. 

Tabor, M.E. 

Glick, H.H. 

Knightly, M.R. 

Rice, V.A. 

Powers, Mrs. J. A. 

Serex, Paul 

Farrar, C.L. 

Morse, M. 

Holdsworth, R.P. 

Knowlton, H. 

Rice, C.C. 

Patterson, C.H. 

Wood, B.B. 

Boguslawski, E.M. 

Chapman, L.V. 

Goodell, H.U. 

Powell, K.L. 

Briggs, L.E. 

Radcliffe, E.J. 

Sievers, F.J. 

Church, Mrs. L.G. 

Donley, J.E. 

Fuller, J.E. 

Ball, A.S. 

Dor an, V/.L. 

Guba, E.F. 

Bennett, E. 

Parkinson, L.R. 

Franklin, H.J. 

Whit comb, W.D. 

Merriam, O.A. 

CI ague, J. 

Bailey, J.S. 
Koon, R.M. 



Rate 


Recommended 


Approved by 


1950 


1951 


Supervisor 


|5540 


|5720 


$5720 


1030 


1140 


1140## 


1480 


1600 


1600* 


1020 


1080 


1080## 


1080 


1140 


1140## 


1080 


1140 


1140## 


1020 


1080 


1030### 


1140 


1209 


1200## 


1030 


1140 


1140## 


1080 


1140 


1140## 


1080 


1140 


1140## 


1030 


1140 


1140## 


2540 


2460 


2460* 


1140 


1200 


1200## 


5729 


5900 


5900 


1140 


1200 


1200## 


5900 


4140 


4140 


1140 


1200 


1200## 


5120 


5500 


5500 


2220 


2400 


2400 


1620 


1740 


1740 


5480 


5720 


5720 


2940 


5120 


5120 


1740 


1860 


1360 


4260 


4500 


4500 


2760 


2880 


2880 


1140 


1200 


1200## 


1740 


1800 


1800## 


1200 


1260 


1260# 


1520 


1580 


1530## 


1740 


1860 


^860 


5780 


4020 


4020 


5400 


5700 


5700 


2040 


2100 


2100## 


1200 


1260 


1260### 


2760 


2940 


2940 


1530 


1440 


1440 


5600 


5780 


5780 


5060 


5180 


5130 


1360 


1930 


1930 


1620 


1740 


1740 


5720 


5840 


5840 


5060 


5180 


5130 


1200 


1260 


1260 


1740 


1360 


1360 


2380 


5060 


5069 


53S0 


4020 


4020 



596 



TRUSTEE 



Name 



THE MASSACHUSETTS AGRICULTURAL COLLEGE 

Rate Recommended Appoved by 



1930 



1931 



Superviso r 



White, H.E. 
Donnelly, E.B. 
Spelman, A.F. 
DeEose, H.R. 
Clarke, M.J. 
Bullis, J.L. 
VanRoekel, He 
McLaughlin, F.A. 
Dunlap, G.L. 
Oleson, G.O. 
Howe, Mrs. J.M. 
Leland, H.A. 
Doane, H.E, 
Carpenter, E.S. 
McKemmie, M.L. 
Larkin, E.M. 
Warner, Mrs. H.M. 
Woodbury, M.A. 
Page, Mrs. E.B. 
Boyd, O.C. 
Dwyer, E.G. 
Haynes, Mrs. H.J. 
Rowe, H.B. 
Donaldson, R.W. 
Morley, Mrs. R.D. 
Heffernan, C. 
Toole, J. A. 
Thayer, C.H. 
Lowry, W.J. 
Ball, L.E. 
Ball, Ida May 

*Part Salary 
##Effective June 1, 1931 
###Effective October 1, 1931 
#Effective September 3, 1931 



|2400 


$2530 


|2580 


1620 


1680 


1630 


1300 


1920 


1920 


2640 


2760 


2760 


1330 


1440 


1440 


2530 


2760 


2760 


3340 


4020 


4020 


3130 


3300 


3300 


2530 


2760 


2760 


2760 


2880 


2880 


1030 


1140 


1140 


3240 


3360 


3360 


2460 


2530 


2530 


2760 


2940 


2940 


1140 


1200 


1200## 


960 


1020 


1020## 


1030 


1140 


1140## 


1080 


1140 


1140## 


3300 


3430 


3430 


3600 


3780 




1020 


1080 


1030## 


3300 


3480 


3480 


4080 


4320 


4320 


3840 


3960 


3960 


2880 


3060 


3060 


1140 


1200 


1200## 


1030 


1140 


1140## 


2220 


2340 


2340 


1800 


1920 


1920 


1920 


1980 


1980 


960 


1020 


1020## 




Bradley, L.A. 



Gibbs, C.S. 



3300 3430 

(Promoted to Professor) 



3430 



3000 3600 3600 

(Promoted to Research Professor) 




* 



TRUSTEE 



• 



THE MASSACHUSETTS AGRICULTURAL COLLEGE 

MINUTES OF SPECIAL MEETING OF BOARD OF TRUSTEES 

Boston City Club, Boston, September 30, 1931, 9:30 A. M. 

Trustee Ellis, Chairman. 

PRESENT ; Trustees Ellis, Griggs, Bacon, Gannon, 

Gilbert, Gerrett, Dewey, Frost, Russell, 
Smith, President Thatcher; also Treasurer 
Kenney. 

The following is the call for the meeting: 

Amherst, Massachusetts 
September 15, 1931 

To the Board of Trustees of 
Massachusetts State College 

Gentlemen: 

Pursuant to action of the Board of Trustees taken 
at their meeting on June 15, a special meeting is hereby 
called to convene at the Boston City Club on Wednesday, 
September 30, 1931 at 9:30 A.M. The purpose of this 
meeting will be to determine the budget of the College 
for 1932 and to consider such other business as properly 
may be presented. 

Respectfully yours, 

/s/ Robert D. Hawley 
Secretary 

The minutes of the preceding meeting were 
approved without reading. 

President Thatcher submitted the following 

list of resignations: 

Death 

Esther S. Davies, Assistant Research Professor of Home 
Economics, July 13, 1931 

Resignations 

Brooks D. Drain, Assistant Professor of Pomology, 

August 31, 1931 
Joseph Euzmeski, Technical Assistant in Bacteriology, 

September 10, 1931 



597 



Call 



Minutes 
Approved 



, Death 



Resignations 



3 






1 



598 



TRUSTEE 



Appointments 



Leave of 

absence 

Professor 

Waugh 



Leave of 

absence 

Miss May Foley 



THE MASSACHUSETTS AGRICULTURAL COLLEGE 

It was 
VOTED ; To approve the resignations as listed above. 
The President submitted the following list of 
appointments: 



Appointments 

John C. Baker, Extension Editor, August 
Mildred Briggs, Assistant Professor of 

September 1, 19-51, $2,700 
Arnold M. Davis, Assistant Extension Sp 

Horticulture, July 1, 1931, $2,400 
Grace B. Gerard, Assistant Extension Sp 

Furnishing, September 1, 1951, £2,700 
Herbert A. Goodell, Junior Library Assi 

July 1, 1951, $1,200 
Yi/ellesley C. Harrington, Extension Spec 

cultural Engineering, July 1, 1931, $ 
Roy E. Moser, Extension Specialist in F 

September 1, 1951, $5,600 
William S. Mueller, Assistant Research 

Dairying, September 15, 1951, $2,400 
Frederick S„ Troy, Instructor in Englis 

1951, $1,000 for 2/5 time 
Bernice C. Wait, Assistant Research Pro 

Economics, September 22, 1931, $2,760 
Herbert E. Warfel, Assistant Professor 

September 1, 1951, $2,220 



1, 1951, $2,520 
Home Economics, 

ecialist in 

ecialist in Home 

stant, 

ialist in Agri- 
5,600 

arm Management, 

Professor of 
h, September 1, 
fessor of Home 
of Zoology, 



It was 



VOTED: 



To approve 
above. 



the appointments as listed 



A request for leave of absence on the pro- 
fessional improvement basis for the spring and summer 
terms of 1952 was received from Professor Waugh. It was 

VOTED : To grant Professor Waugh ! s request for a 

leave of absence for the spring and summer 
terms of 1952 in accordance with the terms 
suggested in his letter. 

It was 

VOTED : To approve the request of Miss May Foley 

for a leave of absence on the professional 
improvement basis for a period of three 
months beginning May 1, 1952. 



* 



# 



♦ 



TRUSTEE 



THE MASSACHUSETTS AGRICULTURAL COLLEGE 

It was 

VOTED ; To approve the request of Professor Peters 
that he be granted a leave of absence for 
one year with pay on account of ill health 
with the understanding that he will employ 
a capable substitute satisfactory to the 
President. 

President Thatcher reported that the adminis- 
trative Cabinet at the College had voted to suspend the 
privilege of professional improvement travel for members 
of the staff for one year beginning October 1 in con- 
sideration of the recommendation of the Governor that all 
travel be drastically reduced. 

A tentative statement in regard to the scope 

of the College was received from the Finance Committee 

without recommendation as to its adoption. Following a 

discussion of the subject it was moved by Mr. Bacon that 

the Trustees adopt the statement as submitted except 

that the last half of the last sentence beginning "Unless 

some new situation" be omitted. Upon motion to amend, 

it was 

VOTED: That Mr. Bacon* s motion be laid on the 

table until the next meeting of the Board, 

President ^hatcher reported concerning the en- 
rollment of girl students and stated that because of 
lack of housing facilities he had closed registration 
in July. He asked the consideration of the Board for 
this problem of housing girl students and following 
discussion it wa^s 



599 



Leave of 
Absence 
Dr. Peters 



Travel 
Curtailed 



Scope of 
College 






Girl Student 
Enrollment 






600 



TRUSTEE 



Auditor's 
Report 



Budget for 
Maintenance 



Budget for 

Special 

Appropriation 



THE MASSACHUSETTS AGRICULTURAL COLLEGE 

VOTED ; That the matter of enrollment of girl stu- 
dents be referred to the Trustee Committee 
on Faculty and Program of Study for report 
at the January meeting of the Board. 

President Thatcher reported concerning the 
action which has been taken upon the report and recommen- 
dations of the State Auditors. 

Recommendation was received from the Finance 
Committee that the budget for maintenance for the en- 
suing year be approved as revised by that Committee, 
totaling $1,046,652.00 from State Funds. President 
Thatcher suggested that a further reduction of $2,030.00 
be made and it was 

VOTED : To recommend to the Budget Commissioner a 

budget for maintnenace for the ensuing year 
totaling $1,044,622.00 from State Funds. 

Upon the recommendation of the Committee on 

Finance, it was 



./ 



VOTED; 



To recommend to the Budget Commissioner a 
budget for special appropriation consisting 
of thirteen rtems and totaling $519,015.00 
with the understanding that the budget be 
submitted in tv/o parts, one listing those 
items which are for maintenance for the pre- 
sent physical plant and the other contain- 



ing 



the items of new construction. 



The meeting adjourned at 11:50 A.M. 
^./rCO^ Pres 



President 




^ (/• Secretary 



m 



• 



• 



• 



TRUSTEE 



* 



THE MASSACHUSETTS AGRICULTURAL COLLEGE 

THE SCOPE OF THE COLLEGE 

Reference to the scope of the College suggests 
two distinct aspects of the organization of the insti- 
tution. One is the field of service and the other is 
the course of study. The field of service of the College 
has grown since its organization in 1863 from one of 
resident instruction of collegiate grade only to a much 
wider field including experiment station research, ex- 
tension service in agriculture and home economics, 
regulatory and control service for enforcement of certair 
laws pertaining to the agricultural industry, and resi- 
dent instruction in short vocational courses not leading 
to a degree. These additional functions have been 
assigned to the College from time to time usually by 
legislative enactment. They are generally recognized as 
important services to the Commonwealth and as properly 
belonging to the functions of this institution. They 
probably represent the full extent 
tion will be called upon to extend 
the field of resident instruction, 
plan exists for further expansion 



to which the institu- 
its services beyond 
At least no present 
in this respect. 



The question of scope as referred to the course 
of study is presumably an inquiry concerning the breadth 
of the subject matter field covered by the curriculum. 
What subjects should this College teach is another way 
of asking for what vocations should it specifically pre- 
pare its students. As has so frequently beei pointed out 
the charter of this College, like that of other land- 
grant colleges, is the Morrill Act of 1862 which states, 
"The leading object shall be, without excluding other 
scientific and classical studies, and including military 
tactics, to teach such branches of learning as are re- 
lated to agriculture and the mechanic arts, in such 
manner as the legislatures of the States may respective- 
ly prescribe, in order to promote the liberal and 
►practical education of the industrial classes in the 
several pursuits and professions of life." 



any way 



The question as to whether this law limits in 
the field of instruction which is to be offered 



at any particular land-grant college is discussed at 
length in the recent report of the "Survey of Land- 
Grant Colleges and Universities." It is stated therein 
that the original Federal Act was intended not tc in- 
augurate a new and special type of education, but rather 
to furnish "liberal and practical" education to the 
"industrial classes" as contrasted with the "intellectual 
classes" for whom only collegiate education was con- 
sidered to be available at that time. Senator Morrill, 
on the 25th anniversary of the establishment of these 
colleges, said: "The design was to open the door to a 



601 



602 



TRUSTEE 



THE MASSACHUSETTS AGRICULTURAL COLLEGE 

liberal education for this large class at a cheaper cost 
from being close at hand and to tempt them by offering 
not only sound literary instruction, but something more 
applicable to the productive employments of life. It 
would be a mistake to suppose it was intended that every 
student should become either a farmer or a mechanic, when 
the design comprehended not only instruction for those 

a trade, but such instruction 
with all the world before 
without the exclusion of those 



» 



who hold the plow or follow 
as any person might need — 
them where to choose — and 



who might prefer to adhere to the classics ." 



TV 



The report of the Survey states further: "Tiere 
is no question and there never has been any question that 
the land-grant university may very properly and is to con- 
siderable degree obligated to offer to students oppor- 
tunities for the general education which it is the purpose 
of arts and sciences to give.* -shbbhs- n^he Interior De- 
partment which administrates the Morrill Act has never 
shown any disposition to restrict State control over the 
offerings of its ov/n higher educational institutions in 
the fields of arts and sciences." **** "All but 10 States 
interpret the Morrill-Nelson Acts to carry as clear an 
obligation to maintain collegiate instruction in the arts 
and sciences as to maintain instruction in agriculture or 
mechanic arts." 

In accepting the provisions of the federal 
grant the legislature of this State provided by law that 
"The leading object of the College shall be to teach sub- 
jects relating to agriculture and mechanic arts, so as 
to promote liberal and practical education. Its curri- 
culum may include other scientific and classical studies 
and shall include military tactics." 

These laws define the field of education in 
which this College is expected to serve and under their 
authority the College has from the first offered courses 
in four fundamental fields; namely, agriculture, horti- 
culture, physical and biological science, and social 
science. In 1919 a course was inaugurated in home 
economics. Except for this addition, no fundamental 
change has occurred in the scope of the curriculum since 
the founding of the College. The five subject matter 
fields listed are those in which the College today offers 
educational training. 

There can be no question concerning the subject 
matter covered by the divisions of agriculture, horti- 
culture, home economics and physical and biological 
science. Perhaps it should be stated that landscape 
architecture is considered by us as a part of the horti- 
cultural field. The term social science is used to des- 
cribe the following courses included in our curriculum; 
education (a normal training course) ,-- economics (general 
and agriculture), languages and literatures, psychology, 



% 



% 



TRUSTEE 



"P 



THE MASSACHUSETTS AGRICULTURAL COLLEGE 






603 



philosophy, history and sociology. In addition, the 
curriculum includes a few fundamental courses in music 
appreciation. Military training is required of all able 
bodied male students and fundamental courses in physical 
education and hygiene are required of all students. 
Elective courses of a more specialized nature are also 
available in both military science and physical education. 
These courses all require the same preparation for en- 
trance and result, upon their completion, in the award- 
ing to the students of the same degree, "Bachelor of 
Science". Hence, this institution is properly known 
as a "college" instead of a "university" which in common 
usage means a grouping under one administration of 
several colleges, which may have different requirements 
for admission and which grant different degrees to stu- 
dents who complete their required curricula. 

No change has been made in the charter or legal 
statement of objectives of the College, or in the scope 
of its resident instruction, by the recent change in its 
name, and no such change is contemplated by its Board 
of Trustees; unless some new situation with reference to 
the needs for state-supported collegiate education in 
Massachusetts should arise and be authorized by legis- 
lative action to change the status and duties of this 
College. 



604 



TRUSTEE 



Call 



Minutes 



Committee to 
wait upon the 
Governor 



THE MASSACHUSETTS AGRICULTURAL COLLEGE 

MINUTES OF THE ANNUAL MEETING OF THE BOARD OF TRUSTEES 

State House, Boston, January 12, 1932, 9:30 A.M. 

Trustee Ellis, Chairman. 

PRESENT : Trustees Ellis, Bowditch, Gerrett, Chandle: 
Russell, Griggs, Dewey, Richardson, Bacon, 
Whitmore, Gannon, President Thatcher; 
Treasurer Kermey. 

The following is the call for the meeting: 

December 31, 1931. 

To the Board of Trustees 
Massachusetts State College 

Gentlemen: 

Pursuant to the provisions of the By-Laws, the 
annual meeting of the Board of Trustees of the Massa- 
chusetts State College is hereby called to convene at 
Room 136, State House, Boston, Massachusetts on Tuesday, 
January 12, 1932 at 9:30 A.M. 

This meeting will be preceded by Committee meetings 
on Monday, January 11, in accordance with the attached 
scheduled. 

Yours respectfully, 

/s/ Robert D. Hawley 
Secretary 

The minutes of the preceding meeting were 
approved without reading. 

The Chairman appointed Trustees Bacon and 
Gerrett a special committee to wait upon the Governor 
and to inform him that the Trustees of the Massachusetts 
State College were in annual session. The Committee re- 
ported that because of the pressure of official business, 
the Governor would not be able to meet with the Trustees 
at this time. 



• 



• 



• 



# 



TRUSTEE 



• 




THE MASSACHUSETTS AGRICULTURAL COLLEGE 

The Chairman appointed Trustees Eowditch and 
Chandler a special committee to present nominations for 
officers and committees for the ensuing year. 

President Thatcher reported the following 
changes in staff which have occurred since the last re- 
port of the Trustees. 

Death 

Walter L. Cutler, Technical Assistant in Pomology, 
October 31, 1931. 

Resignation 

Clayton L. Farrar, Assistant Professor of Entomology and 
Beekeeping, November 30, 1931. 

Appointment 

Claude R. Kellogg, Assistant Professor of Entomology and 
Beekeeping, December 1, 1931. 

It was 

VOTED ; To approve the action of the President in 

accepting the resignation of Mr. Farrar and 
in making the appointment of Mr. Kellogg. 

President Thatcher presented requests from 

Professor R. H. Koon and Dr. Henry VanRoekel for leaves 

of absence. Upon his recommendation, it was 



605 



Nominating 
Committee 



Death 



Resignation 



Appointment 



VOTED : To grant to Professor Koon a six months' 

leave of absence for purposes of professional : 
improvement beginning April 1, 1932. 

Upon the recommendation of the President, it 



R. M. Koon's 



was 



VOTED; To grant leave of absence without pay to Dr 
VanRoekel to enable him to study at Yale 
University, the periods of the leave being 
from September 15, 1932 to Juhe 15, 1933 
and from October 1, 1933 to April 1, 1934. 



Dr. VanRoekel 1 s 
Leave 



606 



TRUSTEE 



Treasurer 1 s 
Report 



President's 
Report 



Tuition for 

Graduate 

Students 



Summer 
School 
Discontinued 



History 

Underwriting 



Dormitories 
Request 



THE MASSACHUSETTS AGRICULTURAL COLLEGE 



The Treasurer presented his annual report and 



it was 



VOTED; To accept the annual report of the Treasurer 
and order it printed. 



The President presented his annual report and 



it was 



VOTED: To receive the report and order it printed. 
Upon the recommendation of the President, it 



was 



VOTED ; That beginning September 1, 1952 graduate 

students shall pay the same tuition, health 
and laboratory fees as are now required of 
undergraduates. Employees of the College 
who are enrolled for either graduate or 
undergraduate courses of study shall be 
exempt from all s"ieh fees. 

For purposes of application of the rule just 
adopted the term "employee" shall mean any person who 
receives a regular monthly stipend from the College. 

Upon the recommendation of the Trustee Com- 
mittee on Faculty and Program of Study, it was 

VOTED : To discontinue the summer school session for 
the year 1932 as an economy measure. 

It was 

VOTED : To approve the recommendation of the Finance 
Committee that the sum of $2500 from the 
Textbook Trust Fund be set aside for under- 
writing the publication of a history of the 
College which it is planned to have pre- 
pared under the auspices of the Associate 
A lumni . 

Consideration was given to the recommendation 

of the President in his annual report concerning the 

emergency need for a women's dormitory. The President 
showed to the Trustees tentative plans for such a 




* 



» 



% 



TRUSTEE 





-. -■■ ■- 



607 



THE MASSACHUSETTS AGRICULTURAL COLLEGE 

dormitory to house 150 women and to provide dining room 

facilities for 250 at an estimated cost of $172,500 for 

the building and $21,000 for equipment, making a total of 

$193,500.. In the discussion which followed there was 

evident a strong sentiment among the Trustees that effort 

should be made, also, to provide a dormitory space to 

accommodate freshman men students. It was 

VOTED : To request legislative appropriation for the 
construction of a women 1 s dormitory in order 
that all women students may be housed on the 
campus and to request an appropriation for 
the construction of a men* s dormitory in 
order to provide dormitory accommodations for 
all freshman men students. 

It was 

VOTED : That the Trustee Committee on Buildings and 

Grounds be instructed to prepare estimates and 
to submit an official request for appropria- 
tions to carry out the above action of the 
Board. 

Upon the recommendation of the Committee on 

Faculty and Program of Study, it was 

VOTED: That the present policy of limiting enroll- 
ment of women students to the number which 
can be housed in college controlled houses 
and in privately owned houses which are 
under college regulations be continued. 

Mr. John Bradford Davis, Executor for the Estate Hardy Bequest 
of Clarence B. Hardy, late of Groveland, appeared before 
the Board to explain that by his will, Mr. Hardy had be- 
queathed the residue of his estate to the Trustees of the 
College. Various mortgages and bills against the estate, 
however, absorbed practically all of the equity. Mr. 
Davis appeared before the Board to petition for approval 



Women f s en- 
rollment 
limit 






608 



TRUSTEE 



Campus Plan 



Forest ExperJ. 

meats 

Station 



THE MASSACHUSETTS AGRICULTURAL COLLEGE 

to sell the property for which he has a customor who 

has offered a price slightly above the appraised value. 

Before taking definite action upon the petition, the 

Board requested the Chairman of the Finance Committee, 

Trustee Gerrett, and Mr. Davis to consult with the 

Attorney-General to seek his advice in the matter. Mr, 

Gerrett and Mr. Davis did consult with a representative 

of the Attorney-General in his office and reported to the 

Board that the Attorney-General 1 s office could give only 

a legal opinion in the matter and that there was nothing 

from this point of view to restrain the Trustees from 

acting upon the petition as requested. It was 

VOTED ; That, on the petition of John Bradford Davis, 
Executor under the will of Clarence B. Hardy, 
late of Groveland, Essex County, Massachu- 
setts, for a license from the Probate Court, 
County of Essex, within the Commonwealth of 
Massachusetts, to sell all the real estate in 
Groveland, aforesaid, of which Clarence B. 
Hardy, died seized, at private sale and sub- 
ject to two certain mortgages $ the said 
petition having been read by the Secretary 
and that the Secretary be and hereby is 
authorized to sign said petition in behalf 
of the Trustees of the Massachusetts State 
College thereby assenting in behalf of said 
College to the allowance of said petition. 

Considering the recommendation contained in the 

annual report of the President with regard to a general 

campus plan for development, it was v 

VOTED ; That the President be authorized to name a 
Committee of the Faculty in accordance with 
the recommendation in his annual report. 



President Thatcher reported to the Trustees that 
it is the present plan of the New England Forest Experi- 
ment Station to remove to another institution within one 
year. 



• 



• 



• 



TRUSTEE 



609 



THE MASSACHUSETTS AGRICULTURAL COLLEGE 

The petition of students of the College that 

all courses in military instruction he made elective was 

taken from the table. President Thatcher stated that he 

believed it to be a matter of general college policy, 

rather than a curriculum matter. It was 

VOTED : To adopt the following resulution: 

Whereas, this Board has received a petition signed 
by 276 students of the College asking that all courses 
in military science and tactics at the College be made 
elective; and 

Whereas, all Land-Grant Colleges are required by 
Federal statutes to offer instruction in military science 
and tactics as a part of their college curricula; and 

Whereas, at each Land-Grant College this instruc- 
tion is now provided by the establishment there of a 
unit of the R.O.T.C. with officers and enlisted men of 
•the U. S. Army .assigned as instructors, and with U. S. 
Army equipment supplied by the War Department as uniforms 
for men and for instruction of classes; and 

?\fhereas, this cooperative arrangement with the War 
Department is the only method which has been found satis 
factory by experience for providing the required offer- 
ings of instruction in military science and tactics at 
Land-Grant Colleges; and 

Whereas, the contract with the War Department for 
the establishment of a R.O.T.C. unit at any college re- 
quires a guarantee of a definite minimum number of stu- 
dents taking this training, which guarantee can be met 
with certainty at this College only by requiring certain 
groups of students to take certain of the courses in 
this department; therefore be it 

Resolved, that we the Board of Trustees of Massa- 
chusetts State College, find it impossible to grant the 
request that all courses in military science and tactics 
at this College be made elective. 

A letter was read from Colonel Romeyn, Head of 

the Department of Military Science and Tactics, which 

Contained a request for Trustee consideration of the 

need for a riding hall and shooting gallery. It was 



Student 
Petition 

Regarding 

Military 

Training 



Request for 

Military 

Building 



610 



TRUSTEE 



Tuxbury 
Lease 



Election of 
Officers 



THE MASSACHUSETTS AGRICULTURAL COLLEGE 



VOTED: To refer this request to the Trustee Com- 
mittee on Buildings and Grounds. 

Upon the recommendation of the Committee on 

Buildings and Grounds, it was 

VOTED; To authorize the Treasurer to negotiate for 
a lease of the Tuxbury tract of land in 
accordance with previous action of the 
Trustees for and in the name of the Trustees 

The Nominating Committee reported is recommenda- 
tions for officers and committees of the Board of Trustees 
for the ensuing year and the Secretary was instructed to 
cast one ballot by which it was unanimously 

VOTED : To elect the following officers and committees 
of the Board of Trustees for the ensuing 
year. 

President, His Excellency, Governor Joseph E. Ely 
Vice-President, George H. Ellis 
Secretary, Robert D. Hawley 
Treasurer, Fred C. Kenney 
Auditor, Frank Gerrett 

Committee on Finance 

Frank Gerrett, Chairman John Chandler 
Nathaniel I. Bowditch Harold L. Frost 
George H. Ellis Davis R. Dewey 

Charles H. Preston 

Committee on Faculty and Program of Study 

Davis R. Dewey, Chairman John Chandler 
James F. Bacon John F. Gannon 

Pay son Smith Arthur W. Gilbert 

Miss Sarah Louise Arnold 

Committee on Agriculture 

Nathaniel I, Bowditch, Chairman Frank Gerrett 
Carlton D. Richardson Arthur W. Gilbert 

George H. Ellis 




# 




TRUSTEE 



THE MASSACHUSETTS AGRICULTURAL COLLEGE 



Committee on Horticulture 



Harold L. Frost, Chairman 
Howard S. Russell 
Charles H. Preston 



John Chandler 
Philip F. Whitmore 
Frederick D. Griggs 



Committee on Experiment Station 



Charles H. Preston, Chairman 
Arthur W. Gilbert 
Howard S. Russell 



Harold L. Frost 
Carlton D. Richardson 
Philip F. Whitmore 



Committee on Buildings and Grounds 



George H. Ellis, Chairman 
Frank Gerrett 
Carlton D. Richardson 



James F. Bacon 
Charles H. Preston 
Philip F. Whitmore 



Committee on Extension Service 

John ^handler, Chairman Davis R. Dewey 

Nathaniel I. Bowditch John F. Gannon 

Frederick D. Griggs Arthur W. Gilbert 

Miss Sarah Louise Arnold 

It was 

VOTED ; That all actions taken by the Committees of 
the Trustees during the year which have not 
been subsequently approved by the Board of 
Trustees be hereby approved. 

It was 

VOTED ; To authorize President Thatcher to call a 

special meeting of the Board of Trustees in 
April or May, if advisable, to consider what 
action may be necessary in connection with 
the limitation of enrollment and such other 
matters as may heed the attention of the 
Board of Trustees. 

Upon the suggestion of Mr. Griggs, it was 

VOTED ; To authorize the Chairman to appoint a 

legislative committee to serve during the 
coming year particularly in connection with 
the request for appropriations for the con- 
struction of dormitories. The Chairman 
appointed Mr. Ellis, Mr. Bacon and Mr. Grigg 

The meeting adjourned at 12:15 P.M. 

{?. . U. 2j>, . Vice 

Ss^SdL^k^ President 



611 



Committee 
actions 



Special 
Meeting 



Special 

Legislative 

Committee 




tar y 



A 



612 



TRUSTEE 



Call 



Minutes 



Resignation 

and 

Appointment 



THE MASSACHUSETTS AGRICULTURAL COLLEGE 

MINUTES OF SPECIAL MEETING OF THE BOARD OF TRUSTEES 
3oston City Club, Boston, April 8, 1932, 1:10 P.M. 



Vice-President Ellis, Chairman. 



PRESENT: 



Trustees Ellis, Preston, Malcolm, Dewey, 
Griggs, Chandler, Bowditch, Russell, Bacon, 
Gerrett, Frost, Gilbert, Miss Arnold, 
President Thatcher. 



The following is the call for the meeting: 



March 24, 1932. 

To the Board of Trustees 
Massachusetts State College 

Gentlemen: 

In accordance with the action of the Trustees at 
their meeting on January 12, 1932, a special meeting of 
the Board is hereby called to convene at the City Club 
in Boston on Friday, April 3, 1932, at twelve o T clock, 
noon. The purpose of this meeting will be to consider 
what action may be necessary in connection with the 
limitation of enrollment and to transact such other 
business as may require the attention of the Trustees. 

Yours respectfully, 

/s/ Robert D. Hawley 
Secretary. 



It was 



VOTED : To dispense with the reading of the minutes 
of the last meeting. 

The President reported the resignation of Miss 
Helen E. Doane, Assistant State Leader of Home Economics 
Clubs, to be effective April 30, 1932 and the appointment 
in her place of Miss Tena Bishop to be effective May 1, 
1932 at a salary of $2,220. 

President Thatcher explained that the budget 
for the current year includes provision for the establish 
ment of a professorship in social sciences beginning 



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TRUSTEE 



THE MASSACHUSETTS AGRICULTURAL COLLEGE 

September 1st and he recommended that the Trustees 

authorize the establishment of this position. In 

accordance therewith, it was 

VOTED :. To authorize the establishment of a new pro- 
fessorship in social sciences effective 
September 1st, next. 

The President explained to the Board of Trustee 
that Dr. Peters, Professor of Chemistry, is absent on 
leave this year by the authority of the Board of Trustees 
and he is supplying a substitute. Dr. Peters feels that 
he will not be able to take up full-time duty next year 
and the President, therefore, recommended that he be em- 
ployed for half-time and that, with the funds thus made 
available by the deduction of one-half of his salary, 
there be appointed a full-time assistant professor to 
make it possible to carry on the work in the Department 
of Chemistry. It was 

VOTED: To approve the recommendation of the Presi- 
dent regarding Dr« Peters 1 position. 

Request was received from Mrs. Ruth D. M Q rley, 
Specialist in Child Development and Parental Education 
in the Extension Service, for a leave of absence without 
pay from February 1933 through part of June, 1933 for the 
purpose of professional improvement. It was 
VOTED : To grant this request. 

In view of the decrease of funds available for 
current maintenance and the increase in teaching load 
caused by large enrollment of students, it was recom- 
mended lby the President and 



613 



Professorship 
Established 
in Social 
Sciences 



Dr. Peters 1 
Position 



Mrs. Morley 1 s 
Leave 



614 



TRUSTEE 



Leaves of 
Absence 



Honorary 
Degrees 



Use of 

College 

Buildings 

by University 

Extension 



Graduation 
Requirement 



THE MASSACHUSETTS AGRICULTURAL COLLEGE 

VOTED ; That the privilege of leave of absence with 
pay for purposes of professional improvement 
be suspended for one year from September 1, 
1932 with the understanding that this action 
shall not effect any leaves already granted. 

President Thatcher informed the Trustees that 
the Faculty had recommended the granting of honorary 
degrees to three candidates, whom he named, at the forth- 
coming Commencement and he asked the tentative approval 
of the Board that he might proceed with the arrangements 
for the granting of these degrees* It was 
VOTED ; To grant this approval. 

Upon the recommendation of the President, it was 

VOTED ; That the University Extension Division of 
the State Department of Education be given 
permission to hold classes in college build- 
ings during the coming summer months at no 
expense to the College other than routine 
care of the rooms. 

The President presented the following recom- 
mendation from the Faculty with regard to requirements 
for graduation; "That Rule 4 of the requirements for 
junior and senior students as printed on page 4 of this 
year 1 s college catalogue be amended to read as follows: 
Rule 4 — Requirements in other groups — Each student 
shall complete during his junior and senior years not 
less that 18 credits in other than his major group. This 
change is to be effective beginning September, 1932." 
It was 

VOTED ; To approve the recommendation of the Faculty. 

The President presented a report from a special 
committee of the Faculty recommending limitation of stu- 
dent enrollment next year. After consideration of the 



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TRUSTEE 



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THE MASSACHUSETTS AGRICULTURAL COLLEGE 



report and thorough discussion, it was 

VOTED; That the Chairman appoint a committee of 
two to draft a motion dealing with this 
problem. The Chairman appointed Mr. Bacon 
and Mr. Griggs. 

The Board recessed while this special com- 
mittee prepared its report. The meeting was called to 
order, the committee made its report and it was 

VOTED : That in view of the unusually large number 
of applications for entrance in the four- 
year course and the impossibility, under 
existing appropriations, of accepting all 
qualified applicants; the Board of Trustees 
hereby limits the enrollment of students in 
next year* s freshman class to approximately 
300 of whom, on account of lack of suitable 
housing facilities, not more than 75 may be 
women; unless an additional appropriation 
should be made justifying an increase in 
the number of accepted applications. 

It was 

VOTED ; That the Legislative Committee take up 

with Governor Ely the problem of lack of 
funds with which to provide opportunity 
for all students who wish to register in 
the four-year course. 

The President presented a financial report of 

the dining hall for the current year and recommended 

approval of the action of the President and Treasurer 

in making a rebate of 75 cents per week to students who 

paid the regular rate of $7.00 per week for board in the 

college dining hall for the first two terms of this year 

and reducing the rate of board to $6.50 per week for 

the third term. It was 

VOTED : To approve the recommendation of the 
President. 



615 



Limitation of 
Enrollment 



Dining Hall 



, 



616 



TRUSTEE 



Cafeteria 



Furniture 
Trust Fund 



Fairs, 
Expenses 
of staff 



Professor 
Waugh* s 
change of 
status 



THE MASSACHUSETTS AGRICULTURAL COLLEGE 

Report was received from a special committee of 
the Faculty recommending certain changes in the plan for 
management of the college dining hall. Following con- 
sideration of this report, it was 

VOTED s That beginning next September the dining 
hall service be placed entirely upon a 
cafeteria basis and that all freshman stu- 
dents in the four-year course and all stu- 
dents who live in campus dormitories be re- 
quired to eat at the college dining hall and 
that the rate of board be $6.50 per week, 
possibly allowing a 50 cent discount for 
those who pay in advance. 

Upon the recommendation of the Treasurer, it was 

VOTED; That all funds collected from students for 
furniture rental for reimbursement of Trust 
Funds, from which furniture was purchased, 
above the amount of $2,608.35 be credited to 
the receipts of the College and turned into 
the State Treasurer and the furniture be 
hereby turned over to the College as a part 
of its equipment. 

Mr. Gerrett raised a question as to the advisa- 
bility of continuing the present college policy of requir- 
ing the agricultural fairs to pay the expenses of members 
of the staff whom they call upon to assist in Judging and 
other fair work. He stated that he felt that the county 
fairs represent an educational enterprise which should be 
supported by the College. Following discussion, it was 

VOTED : That President Thatcher, Mr. Gerrett, and 

Mr. Russell be appointed a special committee 
to study this matter and report recommenda- 
tions at the June meeting of the Board. 

Communication was received from Professor Waugh 

tendering his resignation as Head of the Division of 

Horticulture and expressing his desire to remain as Head 




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THE MASSACHUSETTS AGRICULTURAL COLLEGE 

of the Department of Landscape Architecture* It was 

VOTED : To accept the resignation with appreciation 
for the splendid service which Professor 
Waugh has rendered. 

It was further 

VOTED : That the Committee on Horticulture be asked 
to prepare a suitable letter of appreciation 
of Professor Waugh 1 s services to be pre- 
sented at the June meeting of the Board of 
Trustees for adoption. 



617 



Upon the recommendation of President Thatcher, 



it was 

VOTED: 



To elect Professor R. A. VanMeter as Head of 
the Division of Horticulture to succeed 
Professor Waugh. 



Professor 
VanMeter, 
Head of 
division of 
Horticulture 



President Thatcher read to the Board the follow 

ing letter containing his resignation. 

April 8, 1952. 

To the Board of Trustees of the Massachusetts State 
College: 

Gentlemen: 

It is with very great regret, and only after long 
and careful consideration, that I have come to the con- 
clusion that I must tender to you my resignation as 
President of the College. 

Two factors have been deciding ones in leading me 
to this conclusion. Both of these are, however, the 
result of my own ill-health. As you know, I am now under 
the physical handicap of an apparently irremediable high 
pulse pressure. This is aggravated by mental and nervousi 
strain, and both my own experience and the advice of 
physicians indicate that I must keep as free as possible 
from this if I am to avoid grave risk of serious 
consequences. 



My first and most serious consideration is the 
welfare of the College. I am convinced that this College 
is now entering upon the most important era in its 
history. Former-President Butterfield has told me that, 
during his administration, it was his plan to build up 

the faculty and physical plant of the College to an exten 



- President* s 
Resignation 



- 



618 



TRUSTEE 



THE MASSACHUSETTS AGRICULTURAL COLLEGE 



which would provide adequate facilities for a student 
body of one thousand persons. This enrollment of stu- 
dents has now been reached and passed, and it may be 
said truthfully that the facilities of the institution 
for resident teaching are now being used to their maxi- 
mum efficiency* The recent additions of the Memorial 
and Physical Education Buildings have provided well for 
the social and physical welfare of our present 
body. My immediate predecessor, Dr. Edward M. 



• 



student 
Lewis, 



in his letter of resignation to you five years ago, ex- 
pressed it as his belief that "the immediate problems of 
the Massachusetts Agricultural College are primarily 
those of definition, adjustment and organization." I 
think that it can be said truthfully that these problems 
have been worked out during the past five years to such 
an extent that the College is now "ready to go" upon a 
program of service to the Commonwealth which is limited 
only by the amount of funds which the State will be able 
and willing to provide for its support. To meet the 
opportunities which are thus before it, the College needs 
vigorous and constructive leadership from its President, 
such as it is impossible for me to give if I -am to 
follow the imperative admonitions of physicians that I 
must refrain from severe nervous strain and too vigorous 
physical efforts. 

The second aspect of the situation is the personal 
one. For many years, it has been my hope and plan to 
retire from active administrative work early enough in 
life so that I might engage again in some form of re- 
search work in agricultural chemistry as an avocation for 
the remaining years of my life. My tentative plans have 
called for such retirement after about ten years in my 
present administrative position. But it is now evident 
that it is highly improbable that I will be able again 
to engage in productive research work if I continue much 
longer my present administrative service, with its in- 
evitable unfavorable effect upon my health. It seems to 

to be only fair to myself and to those 
upon me to discontinue this type of effort be- 
incapacitated by it for other productive work. 



me, therefore, 
dependent 
fore I am 



Hence, I have regretfully come to the conclusion 
that I must now tender my resignation as President of 
Massachusetts State College, with the request that I be 
relieved of the responsibilities and duties of that offi 
not later than September 1st, next. 



ce 



May I say to you that the keenest regret that I will 
have in leaving my present position will arise from the 
severance of my official relations with the Board of 
Trustees of the College. Individually and as a group, 
you have been so uniformly kind and courteous to me, as 



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TRUSTEE 



619 



THE MASSACHUSETTS AGRICULTURAL COLLEGE 

well as so considerate of the welfare of the College 
which we serve, that the termination of my official 
relationships with you as President of the College and 
ex officio a member of its Board of Trustees will come 
as a most regretful and distressing experience to me. 

Sincerely yours, 

/s/ Rosoce W. Thatcher 
President 

Following many expressions of regret and personal feel- 
ing by members of the Board, upon the motion of Mr, 
Bowditch, it was 

VOTED : To accept the resignation of the President 
with deepest possible regret. 

It was suggested by Mr. Bacon that it might be Dr. Thatcher 

appointed 
possible to retain President Thatcher at the College as Research 

Professor 
a member of the research staff and following a discussiop 

of this subject, upon motion by Dr. Gilbert, it was 

unanimously 

VOTED ; That Dr. Thatcher be appointed to the 

position of research professor in the Ex- 
periment Station to be effective upon the 
recovery of his health. 

Upon motion by Mr. Bowditch, it was 

VOTED: That the Chairman appoint a special com- Committee 
mittee consisting of the Executive Committee President 
and four others to investigate the possi- 
bilities of filling the position of the 
presidency of the College and to make 
recommendation to the Board of Trustees as 
soon as possible. In addition to the 
Executive Committee composed of Trustees 
Ellis, Bacon and Whitmore, the Chairman 
appointed Trustees Bowditch, Chandler, Griggs, 
and Commissioner Smith. 



on 



The meeting adjourned at 3:10 P.M. 




Vice- 
President 



Y///^6</ ; Secretary 



j 



620 



TRUSTEE 



Call 



B.S. Degree 



THE MASSACHUSETTS AGRICULTURAL COLLEGE 

MINUTES OF SEMI - ANNUAL MEETING OF THE BOARD OF TRUSTEES 

President's Office, Amherst, June IS, 1932, 9:00 A. M. 

Vice-President Ellis presided. 

PRESENTS Trustees Ellis, Gannon, Chandler, Preston, 
Bacon, Griggs, Whitmore, Malcolm, Gerrett, 
Russell, Frost, Gilbert, President 
Thatcher. 

The following is the call for the meeting: 

June 3, 1932 

To the Board of Trustees 
Massachusetts State College 

Gentlemen: 

In accordance with the provisions of the By-Laws, 
the semi-annual meeting of the Board of Trustees is here- 
by called to convene at the President 1 s Office at 
Amherst at 9:00 A.M., Monday, June 13, 1932. The purpose 
of this meeting will be to consider the granting of 
degrees and such other matters as properly may be pre- 
sented at this time. 

Yours respectfully,- 

/s/ Robert D. Hawley 
Secretary 

The minutes of the preceding meeting were 
approved without reading. 

131 candidates were recommended by the Faculty 
to receive the Bachelor of Science degree. Following is 
the list of these candidates; 



• 



• 



Carrolle Elizabeth Anderson 
John Joseph Astore 
Walter Connor Baker 
William Frank Batstone 
Stina Matilda Berggren 
Herbert Lorimer Bishop 
Mary Egesta Black 
Katherine Boland 
John Frederick Bunten 
Theodore Chandler Burns 
John Cecil Burrington, Jr. 
Wynne Eleanor Caird 
Forrest Edward Carter 
Kenneth William Chapman 
Herbert Manton Chase, Jr. 



Howard Alton Cheney 
Gertrude Barber Church 
Mildred Cahoon Clark 
Newell Lloyd Clark 
Webster Kimball Clark, Jr. 
William Bernard Cohen 
John Paine Cone 
Philip Joseph Connell 
William Proud Davis 
Peter DeGelleke 
Albert Lorenzo Delisle 
Thelma Louise Dickinson 
Robert Lev/is Diggs 
Edward Joseph Donaghy 
James Edward Doyle 



• 



1 


THE MASSACHUSETTS 


AGRICULTURAL COLLEGE 


TRUSTEE 


Stuart Deane Edmond 


Ernest Wilson Mitchell, Jr. 




Josephine Eldredge 


Florence Lee Morrison 




Richard Warren Evans 


Harmon Oscar Nelson, Jr. 




Celeste Fiore 


Arthur Lesure Nourse 




William Sidney Fisher, Jr. 


Patrick Edward T Donnell 




Robert Bliss Fletcher 


Margaret Amelia Ohlwiler 




George Millard Flood 


Anna Thankful Parsons 




John Joseph Foley 


Victor Clifton Pineo 




Richard Sloane Folger 


Robert Lonsdale Pollard 




Arthur Lewis Fontaine 


Lilliam Pauline Pollin 




Herbert Leon Forest 


Rial Strickland Potter. Jr. 




Vincent Nicholas Gagliarducci John Joseph Powers 




Leslie Duncan Goodall 


Carlton Gordon Prince 




Azor Orne Goodwin 


Elizabeth Ruth Reed 




Laura Elizabeth Gordon 


Clara Ruth Rice 




William Capewell Greene 


Robert Cameron Roffey 




Robert Charles Gunness 


Paul Howard Ross 




Kenneth Fowler Hale 


Charles Henry Salenius 




Otis Henry Hanslick 


Alston Moore Salisbury 




Arnold Calvin Haynes 


Leonard Austin Salter, Jr. 




Zoe Edwina Hickney 


Aleck Smith 




John David Hitchcock 


Georg Gilman Smith 




Kenneth Elba Hodge 


Frank Leslie Springer 


^ 


Eben Daniel Holder 


Wallace Wyman Stuart 


Oscar Edward- Holmberg 


George Stull Sylvester 


Henry Holz 


Avis Ruth Taylor 


* 


Elizabeth -Vose Howe 


Marie Clarisse Taylor 




Carey Harris Howlett 


Robert Carl Tetro 




Marion Brockway Hunter 


Elmer Joseph Thompson 




Catharine Genevieve Johnson John William Tikofski 




William Anders Johnson 


Oswald Tippo 




Joseph Stanley Jorczak 


Gifford Hoag Towle 




Eugene Joseph Kane 


Henry Harriman True 




John Daniel Kaylor 


Mildred Florence Twiss 




Curtis Gilbert Keyes 


Hans Lodewyk VanLeer 




John Bernard Killeen, Jr, 


William Voorneveld, Jr. 




Susan Glidden Lake 


Melvin Harold Wanegar 




Edwina Frances Lawrence 


Lulu Harriet Warner 




Joseph Lepi 


Philip Wallis Warren 




Harry 0, H. Levine 


Edward Julian Waskiewicz 




William Clinton Libbey 


Edward Winslow Watson 




Edward Alfred Loomer- 


William Homer Wear 




Robert Henry Lorrey 


Pauline Alice Webb 




John Douglas MacLean 


Frederick Joseph Welch 




Nusret Osman Mamaqi 


Charles Butler Wendell, Jr. 




Oscar Margolin 


Eric Hilding Wetterlow, Jr. 




Christine Veronica Markus 


Kenneth Monroe Wheeler 




Donald Mowatt Mason 


Richard White Wherity 




Herbert Lewis McChesney 


Gilbert Yould Whitten 




Orris Elma Merritt 


James Louis Wilson 


♦ 


Richard Hyde Merritt 





621 



622 



TRUSTEE 



B.V.A. Degree 



B.L.A. Degree 



.L.A. Degree 



M.S« Degree 



Ph.D. Degree 



THE MASSACHUSETTS AGRICULTURAL COLLEGE 

It was 

VOTED ; To confer the degree Bachelor of Science 
upon the 131 members of the Class of 1932 
as listed above. 

Upon the recommendation of the Faculty it was 

VOTED ; To confer the degree Bachelor of Vocational 
Agriculture upon Warren White Fabyan and 
Clifford Robert Foskett of the Class of 
1932. 

Upon the recommendation of the Faculty it was 

VOTED; To confer the degree Bachelor of Landscape 
Architecture upon Kenneth Theodore Brown, 
John Cheney Lawrence and Raphael Saraceni. 

Upon the recommendation of the Faculty of the 

Graduate School it was 

VOTED: To confer the degree Master of Landscape 
Architecture upon Sam Finley Brewster. 

Upon the recommendation of the Faculty of the 

Graduate School it was 

VOTED: To confer the degree Master of Science upon 
the following: 

James Bower, Jr. Ralph Francis Nickerson 

James John Chap Costas Nicolaides 

Maurice Mortimer Cleveland Ernest Milford Parrott 

Anna Katherine Digney Francis Civille Pray 

Cora Gennette Dyer Cecil Curtis Rice 

Newell William Frey William Crocker Sanctuary 

Francis Priday Griffiths Alice Goodrich Stiles 

Jay Lamar Haddock John Valentine Strickland 

Alfred Harold Holway John Ay.er Sullivan 

Ernest Mathias Horsley Christine Belle Thatcher 

Paul Dwight Isham Grant Bernard VanVeghten 

Fred William Jones Mildred Ada Weeks 

Wayne Judson Lowry Harold James White 

Charles Patrick McDonnell Inez Wilhelmina Williams 

Upon the recommendation of the Faculty of the 
Graduate School it was 

VOTED : To confer the degree Doctor of Philosophy 
upon Ezra Leon Morgan. 



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TRUSTEE 



THE MASSACHUSETTS AGRICULTURAL COLLEGE 

Upon the recommendation of the Faculty it was 

VOTED: To confer the degree Doctor of Agriculture, 
honoris causa, upon William Penn Brooks of 
the Class of 1375. 

Upon the recommendation of the Faculty it was 



„_«__^ 



623 



1 



Honorary 
Degrees 

William Penn 
Brooks 



VOTED : To confer the degree Doctor of Laws, honori^ Daniel Willard 
causa, upon Daniel Willard and John Emory 
Wilder, both of the Class of 1332. 



President Thatcher reported the resignation of 
Donald E. Stofflet, Instructor in French and Spanish, 
and the appointments of Charles F. Fraker, Assistant 
Professor of Modern Languages, and Richard W. Fessenden, 
Assistant Professor of Chemistry. Mr. Fessenden is to 
fill the vacancy caused by the half-time service of Pro- 
fessor Peters and Mr. Fraker is to fill the vacancy 
caused by the resignation of Mr. Stofflet. It was 

VOTED : To approve the action of the President in 

accepting Mr. Stofflet 1 s resignation and in 
the making of the appointments indicated 
above. 

Upon the recommendation of President Thatcher 

it was 

VOTED: To confer permanent appointment upon Pro- 
fessor A. H. Lindsey and Dr. Henry VanRoeke 
- whose original appointments of three years 
expire in 1932. 

In view of the retirement of Professor Waugh 

from the Headship of the Division of Horticulture and 

the appointment of Professor VanMeter to this position, 

upon the recommendation of the President, it was 

VOTED: Thatbeginning September 1st, Professor 

W f augh f s salary should be f 4500 per year and 
Professor VanMeter' s salary, $4200. 



John Emory 
Wilder 



Resignations 
Appointments 



Permanent 
Appointments, 
A. H. Lindsey, 
& VanRoekel 



< 



Head, Division! 
of Horticulture 



i 



624 



TRUSTEE 



Reappointments 



Leaves of 
Absence, Miss 
Forbes and 
Miss Pozzi 



Leave of 
Absence, 
Professor 

Monahan 



Professor 

Foord, 

Retirement 



THE MASSACHUSETTS AGRICULTURAL COLLEGE 

It was 

VOTED ; To approve the reappointments to the pro- 
fessional staff as made by the President. 

Request was received from '?iss Marion Forbes, 

Assistant State Leader of County Club Agents, that she 

be granted leave of absence without pay for the period 

September 10, 1932 to January 14, 1933 for the purpose 

of studying and completing the requirements for her 

Bachelor's degree. A similar request was received from 

Miss Mary Pozzi, Assistant Extension Specialist in Home 

Economics, that she be granted leave of absence without 

pay for the period January 14, 1933 to June 13, 1933 for 

the purpose of completing requirements for her Bachelor 1 s 

degree. It was 

VOTED ; That the leaves of absence for Miss Forbes 
and Miss Pozzi he granted as requested. 

Request was received from Professor Monahan fo^ 

permission to change the conditions of his leave of 

absence for professional improvement as previously 

granted by the Trustees. It was 

VOTED; To approve Professor Monahan* s present 

request for leave of absence for profession- 
al improvement and to permit such absence 
for a period of five months beginning in 
September and for a period of four weeks 
during the session of the summer school at 
the Storrs Agricultural College. 

Question was raised concerning the status of 

Professor Foord in view of the various actions of the 

Trustees in 1927 concerning this matter. President 

Thatcher explained that according to the provisions 

of the laws governing retirement of employees of the 



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TRUSTEE 



625 



THE MASSACHUSETTS AGRICULTURAL COLLEGE 

Commonwealth an employee may be retired at the age of 

sixty for the good of the service. Following discussion 

it was 

VOTED: That this matter be referred to the Com- 
mittee on Faculty and Program of Study with 
the request that this Committee make a report 
to the Board of Trustees at its next meeting 

It was suggested that the present By-Laws of 

the Eoard of Trustees do not adequately provide for all 

situations in the personnel service and it was 



Revision of 
By-Laws 



VOTED ; That a committee of three be appointed by 
the Chairman to revise the By-Laws at this 
point and report such revision to the Board 
of Trustees for approval and adoption. The 
Chairman appointed Trustees Bacon, Gilbert 
and Chandler. 

President Thatcher reported that he had re- 
ceived informal notification of a bequest to the College 
through the will of Mrs. Pinkerton of Worcester. This 
bequest amounts to ?15,0C0 and is for the purpose of 
establishing two scholarships for students from Worcester]. 

The President reported that the Association of 
Dairy and Ice Cream Machinery Manufactures have es- 
tablished a scholarship at the College for next year. 

The special committee appointed at the last 
meeting to consider the matter of the expenses of judges 
at fairs reported that no action is necessary by the 
Board of Trustees. 

A letter was read to the Board from Colonel 
R. Y. Stuart, Chief Forester of the United State Depart- 
ment of Agriculture, expressing appreciation for the 
accommodations and cooperation extended by the College' 

during the several years in which the Northeast Forest 



Pinkerton 

Bequest 



Dairy 

Fellowship 



Judges at 
Fairs 



Forestry 
Station 



626 



TRUSTEE 



Limitation of 
Enrollment 



Semester 
Plan 



Dining Hall 
Finances 



THE MASSACHUSETTS AGRICULTURAL COLLEGE 

Experiment Station has been located on this campus. 

The special committee appointed to consult 
with the Governor concerning the limitation of the en- 
rollment of students reported that it was unable to pro- 
cure additional appropriations necessary to avoid the 
limitation of student enrollment and that it would, 
therefore, be necessary to limit such enrollment in 
accordance with the action of the Board at its last 
meeting. 

Recommendation was received from the Faculty 

that the course of instruction be again conducted on a 

semester basis in place of the present three-term basis. 

It was 

VOTED ; To approve the recommendation of the 

Faculty that beginning in the fall of 1933 
instruction be on the semester basis with 
all fees at the present annual rate. 

Communication v/as received from Chairman 
Howard of the Commission on Administration & Finance 
recommending that plans be made in the management and in 
budget provisions so that the dining hall can be con- 
ducted on an appropriation basis with all receipts 
returnable to the State Treasury. Following discussion 
it was 

VOTED : To ask the Executive Committee consisting of 
Trustees Ellis, Bacon and Whitmore to in- 
vestigate this matter and report to the 
Board of Trustees at its September meeting. 

Request was received from Professor. Hicks for 
authority to construct a storage building contiguous to 



• 



• 




THE MASSACHUSETTS AGRICULTURAL COLLEGE 

the present Physical Education Cage. It was 

VOTED ; To refer the request to the Trustee Com- 
mittee on Buildings and Grounds with power 
and with the suggestion that such a build- 
ing if constructed be at least of brick 
veneer construction and of such appearance 
as not to detract from general campus 
appearance. 

Treasurer Kenney, who was invited to be pre- 
sent for the discussion of the dining hall matter, re- 
ported that arrangements had been carried out for the 
banking of college funds in accordance with the action 
of the Trustees at their previous meeting. 

The Chairman asked President Thatcher to re- 
port for the Committee on nomination of a President and 
it was reported that the Committee has under considera- 
tion a rather extensive list of candidates and is not 
able to make a specific recommendation at this time. 

The meeting adjourned at 10:40 A.m. 



Vice 
President 





Secretary 



627 



Storage House 

for Physical 
Education 



Banking of 
Funds 



Report of 
Committee 
on President 






628 



TRUSTEE 



THE MASSACHUSETTS AGRICULTURAL COLLEGE 



• 



• 




# 



List of Reappointments, 1952 
No changes in salary- 




Emery, G.E. 

Harrison, A.K. 
Dickinson, L.S 
Serex, Paul 
Bant a, Luther 
Moore, F.C. 
Torrey, R.E. 
Glatfelter,G.V 
Derby, L.L. 
Alderman, G.W. 
Lanphear, M*0. 
Davis,W.H. 
Snyder, G.B. 
French, A. P. 
Khowlton, H. 
Mack, M.J. 
Markuson, M.J. 
Cutler, F.M. 
Barrett, R.H. 
Goding, S.C. 
Hubbard, S.C. 
Tague, W.H. ■ 
Sweetman, H.L. 
Parsons, C.H. 
Priggs, Miss M, 
llaube, M.H. 

Warfel, H.E. 
Kellogg, C.R. 



p 




Hamlin, Miss 
Hicks, Mrs.C.S 
Grayson, E.E. 

Pushee, G.F. 
Newlon, J.B. 
Thayer, C.H. 
Garvey, Miss M 
Smart, H.W. 
Ball , L . E . 
Foley, M.J. 
Roberts, O.C. 
Fo -telle, H.D. 
Rriggs, L.E. 
Lindquist, H.G 
Packard, R.C. 
Vondell, J.H. 
Ross, D.E. 
Lowry , 1 . J . 
Foley, R.C. 
Barnard, E. 
Ellert, F.C. 
iaddock, J.L. 
Rice, C.C. 
Robertson, J. . 

Tuttle, A. P. 



1,800 

3,300 
3,000 
3,300 
3,000 
3,300 
3,300 
3,000 
2,400 
2,700 
3,300 
3,000 
2,580 
2,580 
3,120 
3,000 
3,000 
3,000 
3,300 
2,340 
2,520 
2,400 
2,940 
2,760 
2,700 
2, 220 
(3,600) 

2,220 

2,700 
2,220 
3,540 

2,100 
1,980 
2,340 
1,920 
2,340 
1,980 
2,100 
2,100 
2,100 
1,860 
2,460 
2,220 
2,220 
1,920 
1,920 
2,040 
1,740 
1,740 
1,080 
1,860 
1 , 740 

1,740 



Parrott, E.M 
Rogers, J.R. 
Gilgut, C.J. 

Dempsey, P.W 
Flint, A.E. 
Morse, Miss 
Redmon, B.C. 
Wilson, H.A. 



11.. 



Ga skill, E.F. 



1, 


,740 


1, 


,800 


1, 


,000 


/; 


OOO 


i. 


,980 


i, 


,620 


i 


,740 


i 


,200 


i 


,740 



Jones, C.P. 


2 } 


940 


Jefferson, L.P. 


3j 


300 


Archibald, J.G. 


3j 


,480 


Bailey, J.S. 


3j 


,060 


Guba, E.F. 


3. 


,180 


Whitcomb, W.D. 


3. 


,180 


Fuller, J.E. 


2. 


,940 


Jones, L.H. 


3j 


,000 


Mighell, R.L. 


3. 


,000 


Rozman, D. 


3. 


,060 


Mueller, W.S. 


2, 


,400 


White, H.E. 


o 


,580 


Young, R.E. 


(J , 


,400 


Wait, B.C. 




,760 


Allen. H.L. 


1 


,440 


Ball, A.S. 


1 


,440 


Bennett, E. 


1. 


,980 


Clague, J. A. 


1, 


,860 


Donley, J.E. 


1, 


,260 


Donnelly, E.B. 


1,680 


Hughes, M.C. 


1 


,260 


Merriam, O.A. 


1. 


,260 


Miner, G.I. 


1 


,740 


Parkinson, L.R. 


1 


,740 


Sanborn, Miss R. 


1 


,740 


Sherburne, R.E. 


l' 


,740 


Snell, M.E. 


l' 


,860 


Voorneveld, M.V. 


1, 


,260 


Washburn, D.E. 


l] 


,740 


McLaughlin, F.A. 


3, 


,300 


DeRose, H.R. 




,760 


Dunlap, G.L. 


2 


,760 


France, R.L. 


2, 


,580 


Bullis, K.L. 


2j 


,760 


Flint, O.S. 




,400 


Clarke, Miss M.K. 


1 


,440 


Spelman, A.F. 


1, 


,920 


Howard, J.T. 


1 


,860 


Nagle, Miss M. 


1. 


,200 


Zimnoski, Miss F. 


1, 


,200 



060 



List of Reappointments -2 



# 



^ 



Nodine, E.H. 


2,820 


Carpenter, E.S. 


2,940 


Oleson, G.O. 


2,800 


Baker, J.C. 


2,520 


Forbes, M.E. 


2,700 


Lei and, H.A. 


5,360 


Foley, Mss M.E. 


3,480 


Page, Mrs.E.B. 


3,480 


Haynes, Bffris.fi". J. 


3,480 


Morley, Mrs.R.D. 


3,060 


Bell, E.W. 


2,800 


Pozzi, Miss M. 


2,700 


Davis, A.M. 


2,400 


Gerard, Miss G.B. 


2,700 



* 







# 



F> 

CO NFERENCE WITH TH E ATTORNEY -GENERAL, June 22. 1952 

PRESENT: Attorney-General Joseph E. Warner, Mr. Clapp, Trustees 
Ellis, Bacon, Mr. Kenney, Mr. Hawley. 

The Trustees asked the opinion of the Attorney-General regard- 
ing two matters. First: Does the Dining Hall enterprise at the Massa- 
chusetts State College come within the provisions of Article 63 of the 
State Constitution, as is the contention of Mr. Howard, and therefore 
need to be conducted with funds appropriated by the Commonwealth, all 
receipts being returned to the State Treasury? 

The Attorney-Ceneral refused to give a definite official 
opinion stating that it seemed to him that the way for this matter to 
come to him for official opinion, if at all, was from Mr. Howard of 
the Commission on Administration and Finance rather than from the 
Colige. It seemed to him that the point raised was relatively minor 
and his suggestion was that the T r ustees continue the Dining Hall 
management on the same plan which has been followed for so many years. 

It appeared from the discussion that Mr. Clapp felt that the 
Dining Hall as now conducted is probably a State enterprise. This is 
due, it seems, to the existence of a number of incidental regulations 
which might better be changed than allowed to determine the status 
of the whole enterprise. Mr. Clapp stated that he saw no reason 
why the Dining Hall might not be conducted by a private organization 
such as an association of students and faculty if this should seem 
advisable. 

For the second question the Attorney-General was asked if it 
was his opinion that the use and accounting of funds held in trust by 
the Trustees are subject to audit by the State Auditor and to regula- 
W S tions which apply to the use of funds appropriated to the State College 



# 



# 



# 



> 






by the Commonwealth. While not expressing an official opinion, it 
was apparently his judgement that such funds are subject to audit 
by the State Auditor and they are in essence State Funds, although 
probably not subject to all of the restrictions and regulations which 
apply to the use of funds appropriated by the Commonwealth. 

As a matter of fact, the Trustees have an opinion from a 
former Attorney-General to the effect that F e deral Funds, which are 
in a similar category, are not subject to State regulations so far as 
their use for the travel of members of the staff out of state is con- 
cerned. 

The Attorney-General pointed out that criticism by the State 
Auditor as to use of funds is not necessarily valid. 



» 



% 



• 



♦ 



THE MASSACHUSETTS AGRICULTURAL COLLEGE 

MINUTES OF SPECIAL MEETING 21 ^OARD OF TRUSTEES 

Boston City Club, July 7, 1952, 10:00 A.M. 

Trustee Ellis, Chairman. 

PRESENT ; Trustees Ellis, Malcolm, Frost, Dewey, 
Bacon, Bowditch, Chandler, Russell, 
Preston, Whitmore, Gerrett, Gannon, 
Griggs, Thatcher. 

The following is the call for the meeting: 

June 27, 1932 

To the Board of Trustees 
Massachusetts State College 

Gentlemen: 

A meeting of the Board of Trustees of the Massa- 
chusetts State College is hereby called to convene at 
the Boston City Club at ten o'clock in the morning on 
Thursday, July 7, 1952. The purpose of this meeting is 
to receive the report of the special committee appointed 
to nominate a president and to conduct such other 
business as properly may be presented. 

Yours respectfully, 
/s/ Robert D. Hawley 
Secretary 

President Thatcher reported the recent death 

of Dr. William Wheeler, member of the Board of Trustees 

for many years and formerly Chairman of the Board. It 

was 

VOTED i That the Chairman appoint a committee of 

two to prepare resolutions on Mr. Wheeler T s 
death which resolutions may be spread on 
the records. 

Upon the recommendation of the Faculty the 

following actions were taken regarding certain student 

fees: 

VOTED : To abolish the present towel and locker 
fee in the Physical Education Department 
and to consider the general laboratory fee 
paid by students is reimbursement for ser- 
vices rendered by the Physical Education 



629 



Call 



Death of 

Mr .Wheeler 



Student 
fees 



J 



» 








630 










THE MASSACHUSETTS AGRICULTURAL COLLEGE 


A 


TRUSTEE 




Department as well as other laboratory 
service. 






It 


was 




Student 


VOTED: 


That the matriculation fee of $5.00 be con- 




fees 


- 


sidered a charge for the expenses of 
matriculation and turned in to the State 
Treasury as current income and that no re- 
fund of this fee be made to students. 






It 


was 






VOTED: 


That students who leave college before the 

' idle of a term may have refunded one half 
the term T s fees and that students leaving 
after the middle of the term be not en- 
titled to any refund of fees. 






It 


was 






3 


To approve the collection by the Treasurer 
of an advance payment of $15.00 from each 














prospective new student as soon as the 








Dean f s Office certifies the individual as 


4ft 






qualified for admission. This, will be con- 


▼ 


• 




sidered as first payment on registration fees 








which will be due at the time of matricula- 








tion in September and will be returnable to 








the student if he advises the College before 






August 20th that he will not present himself 








for admission. If the student fails to 








notify the College of withdrawal before that 






date this preliminary payment will be for- 








feited and will be considered payment for 








the expenses involved in prelimin^: - ad- 
mission arrangements. 




Poultry 


It 


was reported to the Trustees by the President 




Disease 








Testing fee 


that a Commi 


ttee of the Massachusetts Federation of 






Poultry Associations had requested that the fee for 






poultry disease testing be reduced one cent on the basis 






that a full ■ 


pre-payment plan be adopted. Upon the 






recommendati 


on of the Head of the Department it was 


- 



In the recent death of Dr. William .Wheeler the 
members of the Board of Trustees of the Massachusetts State 
College realize the loss of a true friend and former colleague 
and of one who over a long period of years served his Alma Mater 
faithfully and well. 

Dr. Wheeler was a distinguished alumnus of the first 
graduating class of the College. For forty-four years he was 
a sagacious and influential member of the Board of Trustees 
serving as its Chairman during the last three years of his 
office. During all the many years of his association with the 
College his guidance and counsel in the administration of her 
affairs have been eagerly sought and graciously and wisely given. 

Be it, therefore, unanimously resolved: 

That there be spread upon the offical records of 
the Board of Trustees a statement of the keen feeling of loss 
sustained through Dr. Wheeler's death ana of appreciation of 
the splendid service which he has rendered through the years. 



# 




• 



TRUSTEE 



yW 



A 



THE MASSACHUSETTS AGRICULTURAL COLLEGE 



VOTED : To approve a pi 
poult ryman who 
deposits funds 
quested service 
College not les 
the collection 
posit and fee t 
cents per blood 
tested and one 



an of payment whereby each 

lies for testing service 
sufficient to cover the re- 

with the Treasurer of the 
s than two weeks prior to 
of blood samples. The de- 
o be at the rate of eight 

sample requested to be 
cent per leg band. 



President Thatcher reported that the barn on 

the Harlow Farm was recently struck by lightening and 

burned to the ground. It was 

7 "TED: To authorize the Treasurer of the College 
to report the loss to proper state 
authorities and to request reimburse- 
ment for the loss based on an accurate 
estimate of value. 

The President reported an offer of the K.R.C. 

Company to establish a fellowship in the Experiment 

Station amounting to J500 per year to cover the salary 

of a part-time investigator. It was 

VOTED ; To approve the establishment of this 
fellowship on the basis recommended. 

The Executive Committee reported its conference 

with the Attorney General regarding the management of the 

Dining Hall and recommended that no change be made in the 

present management. It was 

VOTED ; To adopt the recommendation and to place 
the report on file. 

Request was received from Mr. Farley, State 
Leader of 4-H Clubs for authority to have erected on the 
campus a building for 4-H Club Camps with funds amount- 
ing to approximately £1,300 which he has received from 






631 



Fire at 
Harlow farm 



K.R.C • 
Fellowship 



Dining Hall 
Management 



private sources. It 






4-H Club 

Camp 
Building 



632 



TRUSTEE 



Solicitation 
of funds by 
members of 
staff 



Appointment 



Professor 
Foord* s 
services 
discontinued 



Report of 
committee to 
nominate 
President 



THE MASSACHUSETTS AGRICULTURAL COLLEGE 



r _ 7 TJ17. To refer the matter to the Committee on 
Buildings and Grounds with power. 

Question was raised relative to the policy 

of the Trustees regarding the solicitation of funds 

from private sources by members of the staff for use in 

any project connected with the College. It was 

VOTED ; That Mr. Bacon be asked to frame a reso- 
lution which may be adopted by the Board 
of Trustees affecting a policy in this 
matter. 

Upon the recommendation of the Committee on 

Faculty and Program of Study it was 

VOTED: To appoint Dr. Harry R. DeSilva Professor 
of Psychology at a salary of f3,430 per 
year effective September 1, 1932. 

Upon the recommendation of the Committee on 

Faculty and Program of Study and following discussion of 

the matter it was 

VOTED ; That Professor J. A. Foord T s services as 
•ofessor and Head of Department of Farm 
gement be discontinued as of August 
SI, 1933. 

The special committee appointed to nominate a 
candidate for the presidency reported that it could 
recommend no candidate for that office at the present 
time and asked authority to appoint an administrative 
committee of the faculty to serve in place of the presi- 
dent, provided no one was elected to that office by 
September 1st. It was 

VOTED : To accept the report of the Committee as 
a report of progress. 



• 



# 



TRUSTEE 



n W; 



THE MASSACHUSETTS AGRICULTURAL COLLEGE 

There was a discussion of the advisability 

of appointing an administrative committee of the faculty 

or an acting president to serve in the event that no one 

should be elected to the presidency by S e ptember 1st. 

As a result of this discussion it was 

V OTED ; To authorize the special committee to 
appoint an administrative committee of 
the faculty or an acting president to 
serve in the place of the president 
provided no one is elected to that 
office by September 1st. 

It was 

VOTED : To hold a special meeting Of the Board of 
Trustees on September 29 next for the pur- 
pose of considering the budget for the next 
year and such other matters as properly may 
be presented and that this meeting may be 
preceded by such committee meetings as seem 
necessary. 

Mr. Chandler made a statement of appreciation 

of the splendid service which President Thatcher has 

rendered, not only over the period of five years of his 

office, but particularly during the last few months in 

connection with the search for his successor. TT ^on the 

call of the Chairman a rising vote of thanks and 

appreciation was extended to President Thatcher by all 



present. 



The me 




ing adjourned at IS M. 




Vice 

President 



Secretary 



633 



634 



TRUSTEE 



Miss Arnold 1 s 
Resignation 



Presidential 

Committee 

Report 



Administration 

Committee 

Appointed 



THE MASSACHUSETTS AGRICULTURAL COLLEGE 

MINUTES OF SPECIAL MEETING OF BOARD OF TRUSTEES 

Boston City Club, Boston, September 7, 1932, 2:00 P.M. 

Trustee Ellis, Chairman. 

PRESENT : Trustees Ellis, Frost, Malcolm, Gerrett, 
Gilbert, Bowditch, Whitmore, Griggs, 
Russell, Bacon, Chandler, Smith, Dewey, 
Gannon. 

Dr. Smith brought a message to the Board from 

Miss Arnold explaining that she has presented her resigna 

tion as a Trustee of the College to His Excellency, the 

Governor. Miss Arnold wished to express to the Board, 

and particularly to the Vice-President, Mr. Ellis, her 

appreciation of the friendliness which has characterized 

her associations with the Board. It was moved and 

VOTED : That Dr. Smith be asked to express to Miss 
Arnold the regret of the members of the 
Board at her decision to resign and their 
cordial good wishes for her health and 
happiness. 

Mr. Ellis reported for the Committee on 

Selection of a President stating that this Committee by 

vote of five to two recommended to the Board of Trustees 

the election of Mr. Howard W. Selby as President of the 

College. Following a very thorough discussion of this 

report, it was 

VOTED : That it be accepted as a report of progress 
and acted upon at the next meeting of the 
Board. 

Following consideration of plans for the ad- 
ministration of the College in the absence of a President, 
it was 




• 



• 



'9 



TRUSTEE 



^•^ 



^ 



635 



THE MASSACHUSETTS AGRICULTURAL COLLEGE 

VOTED : That the affairs of the College be 

administered by a Faculty Committee composed 
of Mr. Hawley, Secretary of the College, 
Chairman; Mr. Machmer, Dean of the College; 
Mr, Sievers, Director of the Experiment 
Station; Mr, Munson, Director of the Ex- 
tension Service; Mr. Verbeck, Director of 
Short Course; and Mr, Kenney, Treasurer of 
the College, and that the Secretary of the 
College be empowered to sign all necessary 
official papers. 

The Secretary reported regarding the prospects 
for student enrollment during the coming year indicating 
a probable increased enrollment of about 100 students ove 
the total enrollment of last year. 

The Secretary also presented a report of the 
situation regarding the housing of women students. An 
increase in the number of rooms off-campus together with 
the activities of sororities in securing homes has 
apparently removed the limitation which housing facilities 
have placed upon the enrollment of girl students. 
Questions are raised by. this situation concerning the 
development of sorority houses and the policy of the 
Board in trying to secure appropriations for the con- 
struction of a. woman's dormitory. Dr. Gilbert stated 
that the question of student housing had been discussed 
at the annual meeting of the Associate Alumni in June 
and that a Committee of Alumni had been appointed to 
study the problem. He thought that this Committee 
would bring in a report which would be helpful to the 
Trustees in considering the problem. The matter was 
left pending the report d>f the Alumni Committee. 



Enrollment 
Report 



Housing of 

Women 

Students 



636 



TRUSTEE 



Bequests 



Trust Fund 
Expenditures 



THE MASSACHUSETTS AGRICULTURAL COLLEGE 

It was announced that a bequest of $10,000 has 

been made to the Trustees of the College by the will of 

Dr. William Wheeler and that four scholarships of $200 

each have been provided by the generosity of Dr. 

Charles H. Hood. It was 

VOTED: To ask the Vice-President to express to Mrs. 
Wheeler and to Dr. Hood the appreciation of 
the Board for these splendid gifts. 

Upon the recommendation of the Treasurer, it was 

VOTED : To authorize the payment from the Burnham 
Emergency Fund of $48.87 as one-fourth the 
cost of an inhalator to be purchased jointly 
by the Town of Amherst, Amherst College, and 
The Amherst Gas Company. 

Upon the recommendation of the Treasurer, it was 

VOTED: To fix a charge of $6.00 per week for board 
for all students eating in the college 
dining hall during the ensuing year and who 
pay for such board in advance. 

It was 

VOTED: To approve the payment from the Burnham 
Emergency Fund of the sum of $259.25 to 
Othote, caterer, for the expenses of the 
Alumni luncheon of last Commencement. 

It was 

VOTED: To authorize the payment of $10.20 from the 
Burnham Emergency Fund to cover the cost of 
flowers sent by the College to the funeral 
of Dr. William Wheeler. 

It was announced that the next meeting of the 
Board, in accordance with action already taken, would be 
held on September 29th at Boston. Formal notice will be 
sent to each member of the Board by the Secretary. 

The meeting adjourned at 4:00 P.M. 

Vice 
President 

Secretary 




na^A^ 



• 



• 





SSE? 



TRUSTEE 





637 



THE MASSACHUSETTS AGRICULTURAL COLLEGE 

MINUTES OF SPECIAL MEETING OF THE BOARD OF TRUSTEES 

Boston City Club, Boston, September 29, 1&3€, llrOO A. M 

In the absence of Trustee Ellis, and at his 

request, Trustee Smith presided. 

PRESENT : Trustees Smith, Frost, Malcolm, Dewey, 

Bacon, Gannon, Griggs, Gerrett, Preston, 
Russell, Whltmore, Bowditch, Mrs. Leach; 
Treasurer Kenney. 

It was 

VOTED: To dispense with the reading of the call for Call 

the meeting and the minutes of the preceding Minutes 
meeting. 

The Secretary reported an increase in enroll- 
ment of undergraduate students of approximately 100 stu- 
dents this year as compared with enrollment of a year ago. 

The following resignations were reported by 
the Secretary: 



G. Bernard VariVeghten, Instructor in Botany, 

August 31, 1932. 
Glen L. Dunlap, Assistant Veterinary Pathologist, 

September 30, 1932. 



Resignations 



The following appointment was reported by the Appointment 



Secretary: 



Carrolle E. Anderson, Instructor in Botany, 
September 1, 1932, $1,000. 

The above resignations and appointment have 

been confirmed by the Administrative Committee and it was 

VOTED :, To approve this action of the Administrative 
Committee. 

Mrs. Joseph S- Leach, who has just been 

appointed to the Board of Trustees to fill the vacancy 

caused by the resignation of Miss Sarah Louise Arnold, 

was welcomed to membership in the Board. 



Mrs. Leach 
Introduced 



638 



TRUSTEE 



THE MASSACHUSETTS AGRICULTURAL COLLEGE 



Department 
Education 

Name 



Graduate 

School 

Tuition 



Budget 






Budget for 
Special 
Appropria- 
tions 



Report of 
Committee 
on 
President 



Upon the- recommendation of the Committee on 

Faculty and Program of Study/ it was 

VOTED; That the name of the Department of Agri- 
cultural Education be changed to Department 
of Education. 

Upon the recommendation of the Committee on 

Finance, it was 

VOTED : That the^ action of the Board of Trustees of 
January 12, 1932 establishing tuition and 
other fees for graduate students be revised 
to read, "Beginning September 1, 1933 
graduate students shall pay the same tuition, 
health, and laboratory fees as are now re- 
quired of undergraduates." 

The budget for maintenance for the ensuing year 

was presented and upon the recommendation of the Committee 

on Finance, it was 

VOTED : That the budget for maintenance for the year 
1932-33 be approved for the total sum of 
11,000,715 according to revised estimates 
submitted . 

Upon the recommendation of the Committee on 

Buildings and Grounds, it was 

VOT 



To adopt a budget for special appropriation 
for the ensuing year totaling $426,500 and 
composed of the following six items: 

1. Water mains for fire protection .f 10,000 

2. Repairs & improvements to steam lines 60,000 

3. Road repairs........ 8,500 

4. Drill Hall floor reconstruction 3,000 

.5. Dormitory for men 160,000 

6. Dormitory for women... 195,000 

x Yie report of the Committee on the Selection of 

a President was presented by the Chairman, Dr. Smith. At 

the request of the Committee, it was 

VOTED : To permit the withdrawal of its recommenda- 
tion presented at the last meeting of the 
Board and now on the table. 



• 



• 



• 






- v 



TRUSTEE 



^ 



THE MASSACHUSETTS AGRICULTURAL COLLEGE 

Dr. Smith reported that since the last meet- 
ing the Committee has had very favorable negotiations with 
Dr. Hugh P.. Baker, Dean of the New York State College of 
Forestry at Syracuse University. It is the wish of the 
Committee to recommend the election of Dr. Baker to the 
presidency of the College but before doing so it wishes to 
be assured that he will accept the position if elected 
and he has explained to the Committee that he will not be 
able to give such assurance until October 1st. This re- 
port was favorably received by the Board of Trustees and 
in view of these circumstances, it was 

VOTED : To adjourn this meeting until Thursday, 

October 6th when it will be reconvened at 
1:00 P.M. at the Boston City Club for a 
luncheon meeting. 



Vice 
President 




'UtluL 



.Secretary 



639 



* 



640 



TRUSTEE 



Hugh P. 
Baker 
Elected to 
Presidency 



Notifica- 
tion of 
Governor 



Budget Plan 



THE MASSACHUSETTS AGRICULTURAL COLLEGE 

MI NOTES OF SPECIAL MEETING OF THE BOARD OF TRUSTEES 

Boston City Club, Boston, October 6~, 1952, 1:00 P. M. 

Trustee Ellis presided. 

PRESENT : Trustees Ellis, Bacon, Malcolm, Russell, 
Preston^ Gilbert, Bowditch, Whitmore, 
Gannon, Frost, Gerrett, Dewey, Griggs, 
Mrs. Leach. 

The Special Committee -on the Selection of a 

President reported that pursuant to announcement made at 

the previous meeting, it had negotiated with Dr. Hugh P. 

Baker who. has agreed to accept the appointment to the 

Presidency of the College provided he is elected by the 

Board. of Trustees e Therefore, upon the recommendation of 

this Committee, it was 

VOTED: That Dr. Hugh P. Baker be, and hereby is, 

elected as President of Massachusetts State 
College to take office as of February 1, 
1933, with salary at the rate of f 7200 per 
year together with the emoluments which 
customarily pertain to this office. 

Upon motion duly made and seconded, it was 

VOTED : That Mr. Malcolm be appointed to notify His 
Excellency, Governor Ely, that the Board of 
Trustees has elected Dr. Baker to the Presi- 
dency of the College. 

Question was raised regarding the consideration 
of the budget. It seemed to be the opinion of the 
Trustees that they wished to have opportunity for further 
preliminary consideration of the budget before final 
action had to be taken. So far as this business will be 
handled in the future and as a result of this considera- 
tion, upon motion duly seconded, it was 



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TRUSTEE 



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641 



THE MASSACHUSETTS AGRICULTURAL COLLEGE 

VOTED r That budget figures as approved by respective 
Trustee Committees be in the hands of members 
of the Board of Trustees at least fifteen 
days before the meeting of the Board when 
final action for approval shall be taken. 

There was a discussion of the dormitory item 

as approved for inclusion in the budget for the ensuing 

year and it was 

VOTED ; That the Legislative Committee of the 

Trustees be authorized to take last year's 
special bill which requested appropriation 
for the construction of two dormitories from 
the files and reintroduce it at the present 
session of the Legislature. 

The meeting adjourned at 2:10 P.M. 



Dormitory 
Bill 




Ar. £/%ltJi President 




^^/X A/Secretary 




642 



TRUSTEE 



Call 



THE MASSACHUSETTS AGRICULTURAL COLLEGE 

MINUTES OF" SPECIAL MEETING OF THE BOARD OF TRUSTEES 

Boston City Club, December 12, 1932, 12:00 M. 

Trustee Ellis, Chairman. 

PRESENT; trustees Ellis, Bow air ch, Chandler, Dewey, 
Frost, Gannon, Gerrett, Gilbert, Griggs, 
Mrs. Leach, Malcolm, Preston, Russell, 
Smith, Whitmore; also Treasurer Kenney 
and Secretary Hawley. 

Amherst, Mass. 
December 1, 1932 

To the Board of Trustees of 
Massachusetts State College 

Gentlemen: 

At the request of three Trustees, which accords 
with the provisions of the By-Laws, a special meeting of 
the Board of Trustees is hereby called to convene at the 
Boston City Club at noon on Monday, December 12, 1932. 
This will be a luncheon meeting. The purpose of the 
meeting will be to consider and take such action as may 
seem desirable upon the suggestion of the Legislative 
Commission on State and Municipal Expenditures that 
tuition charges at this College be raised to $100 per 
year for residents of Massachusetts and $300 per year 
for residents of other states. 

Yours respectfully, 
/s/ Robert D. Hawley 
Secretary 



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Amherst, Mass. 
December 3, 1932 



To the Board of Trustees of 
Massachusetts State College 

Supplementary Call for Special Meeting of 
Board of Trustees 

Gentlemen : *.. 

In accordance with the request of three members of 
the Board of Trustees there is hereby add^d to the agenda 
of the Special Meeting of the Board to be held at the 
Boston City Club at twelve o'clock, noon, on Monday, 
December 12, 1932, dall for which was issued under date 
of December 1st, consideration of the proposal for the 
construction of "dormitories at the College and such other 
business as properly may be presented together with what- 
ever action on these matters may appear advisable. 



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Yours respectfully- _ TT , 

_ J R. D. Hawley. Secretary 







TRUSTEE 



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643 



THE MASSACHUSETTS AGRICULTURAL COLLEGE 

The Chairman asked Commiss toner Smith to make 
an explanation of the situation regarding tuition charges. 
Dr. Smith explained that he had been advised by the Sub- 
Committee on Education of the Legislative Commission on 
State and Municipal Expenditures that it was their pur- 
pose to recommend to the Legislature that tuition fees at 
the College be increased to $100 for residents of the 
State and to #300 for non-residents. In Conference with 
Mr. Ellis it had seemed wise to call this meeting of the 
Board of Trustees to see if the Board might wish to give 
early consideration to this matter and perhaps itself 
change the rate of tuition charged at the College. The 
Secretary presented a report from the Administrative Com- 
mittee of the College which indicated that it is the 
opinion of that Committee that tuition charges at the 
College should not be raised. Following discussion of 
the matter it was moved by Dr. Dewey and seconded by Mr. 
Griggs that the tuition fee for resident students at the 
College be raised from $60 to $100 per year and the $12 
general laboratory fee be eliminated. 

Motion to amend was made by Mr. Bowditch and 

seconded by Dr. Gilbert that the $100 amount mentioned 

in Dr. Dewey's motion be reduced to $80 and the $12 

laboratory fee remain as at present. There was 

discussion of the advisability of postponing definite 

action on this matter until opportunity has been given 

for further consideration and upon motion of Dr. Smith 

it was 

VOTED : That these motions be laid on the table for 
consideration at the annual meeting of the 
Board. 



Tuition 



644 



TRUSTEE 



Dormitories 



Dr. Thatcher* 
Appointment 



THE MASSACHUSETTS AGRICULTURAL COLLEGE 

It was 

VOTED ; To make the matter of tuition charge an 

item of business at the forthcoming annual 
meeting. 

Dr. Gilbert explained to the Trustees the re- 
sult of his investigation of the possibility of arrang- 
ing for the construction of dormitories at the College 
through funds loaned from the Reconstruction Finance 
Corporation of the Federal Government under its provisions 
for self-liquidating projects'. He had considered at one 
time that this arrangement might be quite possible, but 
recent developments have made it seem more doubtful. 
It was 

VOTED ? That the Chairman appoint a special com- 
mittee of three to study methods of financing 
the construction of dormitories. 

The Chairman appointed Trustees Gilbert, Griggs 
and Bacon, 
s The following recommendation was. presented from 
the Administrative Committee of the College. "Pursuant 
to action of the Board of Trustees taken at their special 
meeting on April 8, 1952, it is recommended that Dr. 
R. W. Thatcher be appointed Research Professor of Chemis- 
try, in the position to be. made vacant by the retirement 
of Dr. J # B. Lindsey on December 26, 1932. It is further 
recommended that Ms appointment become effective on 
March 1, 1933 or as soon thereafter. as Dr. Thatcher may 
report for duty and that the salary be the normal entrance 
rate for this grade, $3600 per year." It was 
VOTED : To adopt the recommendation. 



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r/wyfcre/if 




To: 



Sir; 



Secretary of Board of Trustees, 
Massachusetts State College 



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We, the undersigned Trustees of the Massachusetts 
State College, hereby request that a special meeting of the 
Board be held in Boston on December 12, 1932 for the purpose 
of considering and taking such action as may 'appear advisable 
relative to the suggestion of the Legislative Commission on 
State and Municipal Expenditures that tuition charges at the 
State College be raised. 




Trust 



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Trustee 



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S&wnJvew'-d'Z/ 



To: Secretary of Board of Trustees, 
Massachusetts State College 



Sir 



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We, the undersigned Trustees of the Massachusetts 
State College, hereby request that there be added to the 
agenda of the Special Meeting of the Baard called for 
December 12, 1932, the consideration of the proposal for 
the construction of dormitories at the College and such 
other business as properly may be presented together with 
whatever action on these matters may appear advisable. 




ht' & fJLA * 



Trustee 




Trustee 



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Trustee 



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♦ 




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ALFRED KELLOGG 

VJonsuitinrf JLntfineer 

Tower - 11 eating- Li tfntin d - Keirideration 

i)85 Doylston Otreet, (jopley Oqitare 
Doston, r\e 



lass. 



SuLject: Supplementary Report 

On Central Heating Plant 
Mass. State College 



January 29, 1932 



Mr, ?red C, Kenney, Treas, 
Massachusetts State College 
Amherst, Mass. 

Sear Sir? 

This supplementary report is in confirmation of the discussion with 

the Trustees of the State College, held yesterday at the Boston City 

Club. 

1. Errata. During our talk yesterday there appeared to he an 
error in Seotion I, page 1, paragraph U, stating that the Increase in 
coal burned since 1928 amounted to 2,6$. This should have been more 
clearly stated. The demand for electricity increased approximately 
22,5, out mo»t of this came in 1931 . 

2. The Increase in coal stated in the report covered eight 
months of 1930 and the corresponding eight months of 1931* 

3. The coal savings effected in the plant between the years 1928 
and 1930, to the end of 1930, amounted to something over 16$, which is 
a very creditable saving, 

U, This explanation is merely for the purpose of correcting the 

recori, 

5. estimated Savings from Use 

of Manufactured Current. The following reference Is made 

to the tabulations, Section III, pages 7 and S, of the report, and were 



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2. 

explained In detail to the Trust*** yesterday , a* follows: 

OpJLfL &LJ& opx. fl 

In favor 

llanufacturad Current $U,U78. $5,268. $5,^58. 

leual to 5* ** $90,000. $105,000. $109,000. 

Tears required to 

equal inv**tm*nt 9 *••*• 1{ »•**» 1\ !•*** 

1. lri*fly, the above tabulation show* that at a fixed rat* of 5% 
Interest, the saving from the us* of Manufactured current would *qual th* 
interest on the investment stated. 

2. Likewise, the savings *f fee ted by the us* of manufactured current, 

on the estimated cost of Installing a low pressure steam distribution system 

approximately 
or a high pressure system, amounting t*/$'K) 9 000. , would require th* number 

of years stated above to retire the Investment. In this case, no account 

Is taken of any capital investment ether than th* difference in coot betw**n 

a high prvssur* and a low pressure installation, although a* stated in th* 

report, it will be necessary, if th* College continues to manufacture current, 

to make a considerable investment in new electrical equipment within the 

n*xt three to five years, amounting to at least $25,000. 

3. It may be stated that a manufacturing organisation will rarely 
consider the coet of improvements to increase the efficiency of their plant 

Unless th* saving du* th*r*to will wipe out th* investment in not to exceed 

and 
four years ,/ frequently les*,time. 

U. Wasted Steam. It ha* been suggested that th* report is in error 
In the estimated amount of steam going to waste from the turbine exhaust. 
5. We have no real mean* of knowing whether our estimate in that res- 
pect is correct or not. Bow*v*r, it makes no difference, from the fact 
that plant records show that there is a difference of 3l£ between the steam 



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3. 

going into the heating system and the returns coming back to the "boiler 
house, Whether part of this is engine exhaust to the atmosphere or other 
naste, is immaterial. 

1. Present Underground Installation. Some discussion took place 
yesterday with a view to determining whether it would he a wise procedure 
to Install new steam and return pipes in the present conduit lines, 

2. We are very positive that to do so would prove fully as expen- 
sive as a new system of pipes and conduits. There are several reasons 
why we believe such a procedure would he a mistake. They are as follows* 

a, Zf the present conduit lines should he utilised, we are of the 
opinion that there would he about 25$ greater length of pipe to 
he laid than in the new layout that the report suggests. The 
record of the present lines was returned to the College last week. 

b, Sxperlence has shown that the salvage of conduit la removing old 
pipes is not very great, and considerable expense for new conduit 
would he incurred. 

c. The original insulation of the pipes in the conduit consisted 
of loose filler, which undoubtedly has disappeared to a consid- 
erable extent, leaving the present pipes bare. Modern insula- 
tion will take up a great deal more room in the conduit, there- 
fore no Increase in pipe sizes can be considered, and it is also 
doubtful if the same sizes of pipes as at present can he installed 
In the present conduit with t>rouer insulation. 

d. On excavating the conduit lines, it will probably be found that 
the underdrains are plugged with roots from adjacent trees, as 
is nearly always to be found. Where such is the case, the en- 
tire line will have to be taken up, cleared and relaSd, and the 
cost of so doing would exc eod the cost of new work. 




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e. We believe the present installation iras not oarefmlly 
planned, as the runouts from the underground mains to the 
several "buildings are altogether too long, and it would he 
very ouch hotter to keep the mains as close to the "build- 
ings as possible. 

1. 111 in all, we think it would be a very wasteful procedure to 
endeavor to use the present conduit with new piping. 

2. The expansion pits would have to be at least not more than 
Uoo ft. apart, as would be the case with any high pressure installation, 
and su»h pits and their equipment are quite expensive. 

3. Engineering Plans. We understand from the conversation yester- 
day that the Trustees have about $lU,000. available to carry on such work 
as they may feel necessary this coming year. We do not consider it ad- 
visable to attempt the installation of underground work with such a small 
appropriation. 

k. If we may be permitted to suggest , it would be that the Trustees 

decide whether a high pressure or a low pressure steam distribution system 
shall be installed, utilising from the $lH,000. appropriation the amount 
necessary for engineering surveys and drawings. 

5. If this is done promptly, it will permit beginning the work of 
construction immediately upon receiving legislative appropriation. At 
best it will take two months or more to make the surveys and drawings, and 
the installation would probably require four to five months, making it de- 
sirable to begin the construction work as early as possible after spring 
opens. 

6. Pages G and G-a of the Appendix afford estimates of the cost 

of different sections of the underground installations, in the event that 
the College decided to have portions of it installed at different times. 









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1. It might he farther said that a high pressure installation in 
Sections A and B would permit the use of exhaust steam, as at present, in 
average weather. In extreme cold weather, however, high pressure steam 
could be used on this line without affecting the use of exhaust steam in 
the remainder of the lines, 

2. Charges for Purchased Current. The cost of purchased electric 
current may , through proper negotiation, he reduced from the quoted price 
of 1.3 cents per K.W, hour* 

3. Also, a sliding scale of charges may he secured, "beginning at 
1.3 cents and in three years, say, reducing to 1 cent per K.W, hour or 
less. Too long delay in this matter may result in reducing the value 
of your present generating equipment as a most necessary saand-by plant. 
k. If we can serve you farther, please call upon us. 

Very truly yours, 

AK/L A 1 F R 3D K 2 L L G & 






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Alfred Kellogg 

CONSULTING ENGINEER 

POWER - HEATING-LIGHTING 

REFRIGERATION 

585 boylston st., copley sq. 
Boston, Mass. 

Report oft Contra! Heating 
and Sloe trie Plant, Mass- 
achusetts State College. 

January 18, 1932 
Mr. Fred C. Kenney, treat. 
liassaehusette State College 
Amherst, Mats. 

Sear Sir; 

1. As requested 1a your letter of October 16, 1931, we submit the 
following report on the Central Beating and Electric Plant of the llaeea- 
ehnsette State College. 

PUBPOSft Of TBS 11708! 

2. the purpose of this report is ae follows; under 

a. Soot ion X. Consider the probable growth of the College, 

and in general, state the physical condition of the pres- 
ent plant. 

b. Section XX. ¥0 determine the most efficient and economical 
method of temperature control within the various buildings 
supplied with steam from a Central Seating and Lighting Plant. 

e. Section III. To determine the proper and most efficient 
meane of furnishing steam for heating and process neede, and 
electric energy far lighting and power, and to approximate 
the Installation coat of the changes and plant extensions 
recommended in this report. 
d. Section X?* Consists of Appendieee in which will he found 
certain necessary calculation* in part nfmrr^ to in the 
body of the* report. 






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J-706 I. 

S 1 f I I t 

X, future growth. In order to determine the future else end caper- 
city of a new or remodeled steam end electric plant, Including also the im- 
mediately important underground ay t tea of steam distribution, conai dera- 
tion hae been given to the growth of the College since 1901 . in which year 
much of the present underground piping was inet ailed. Conservatively es- 
timated, the growth ever this period was shown to have been at least 100#. 
This estimate and the estimate of the probable future growth of the College, 
was arrived at from the conference with President Thatcher and yourself* 

2. Inasmuch as any underground piping plant oust provide capacity 
during its practical life, for both the present load and any future growth, 
it must be designed accordingly. This Is specifically considered later 
in this report. 

3. Careful consideration must be given to the item of Increase in 
the number of buildings and plant likely to be erected in the next 25 to 
30 years, for upon this decision rests all the calculations, recommenda- 
tions and eetiaatee of cost covered by this report. 

k. An a minor illustration, the increases in load since 1928, as 

taken from the plant records are shewn to have approximated; 

In electricity &.5i 

In steam (evaporation) **£ to 6£ 

In coal burned 2.6$ 

The fact that the increase in evaporation and coal burned did not keep 
pace with the increased demand for electricity, likewise that the coal 
burned during that period, was measureabie lees in proportion to the 
evaporation, may be credited to minor improvements made in the present 
equipment and to greater care in operation effected by your engineer. 






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J-706 X- 2 

|. tfe reiterate, it it plainly evident that a new system of under- 
ground eteam distribution should be installed very soon. lha pro went sys- 
tem doee net properly care for the present load and eeme of the educational 
departments are at present hampered In their work by lacfc of eteaa at prop- 
er pre source. 

t # To begin with, no. Ineroaee in eteaa pressure ie permissible on 
the present piping from lade of proper equipment to care for the increased 
expansion (pipe) das to a feigner pressure, nor would it probably be safe 
to carry a higher back pressure on the present turbines, Either an in-* 
creese in eteaa pressure or larger underground steaa aalne are not only 
clearly indicated at this time, but will be increasingly evident as build- 
ings are added froa tlae to tlae. 

5. To remedy these difficulties in the preeent installation jw of 
course possible, but the attendant ooet weald be groat, the results only 
measurably hatter than at present, and the operating ooet would greatly 
Increase. 

*t. Of greater consideration, however, le that the preeent plant hae 
boon In constant use 25 to 30 years, and hae practically reached the limit 
of ite useful life* 

5* Boilers. fne preeent boilers, four in number, are listed la 
detail la Appendix «a». 

6. These boiler* and their equipment aggregate 1,V*Q horse power 
according to etandard rating, and without undue forcing are capable of be- 
ing operated to 20t?£ of their rating for reasonable period*. fhie ie — 
with ample spare capacity — generally in excess of any future demand now 
in eight, and at least during the remaining life of the preeent boiler plant. 

7. These boilers are not properly eet for the beat economy, nor can 
they be operated without an undue amount of smoke, due to their having boon 



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set too leu. flhen the time arrive* for the replacement of one or sere 
of the boilers, consideration should be given to raising the boiler house 
roof and csoke breaching, with * new connect ion to the present ch lamer. 

1. In the erent of the boiler* being need for providing eteas for 
heating purpoeee only, and et high pressure as considered later in this 
report, one of the forced draft ©lowers sight well he cheated to electric 
motor drive for nee at times when there sight he little or no use for the 
exhauee eteas fros the turbine driven blower. This, however, is not con- 
sidered of great ia$ortanee # 

2. Of the present boiler feed poops — three la number — one la 
now driven by an electric actor, one le a eteas driven reciprocating peso 
and the other a eteas turbine driven poop. This arrangement of pumps la 
considered suitable for any of the operating conditions under consideration. 

3. Turbine generator*. Sleet rio power ie euppliad fros three tur- 
bine driven generators, 2-300 K.W. unite, 1-100 K.W. , 3 phase 60 cycles, 
2300 volte, 

U. The three generators are la apparently good condition. The tur- 
bine driving one of the W K. W. units has been rebuilt and ie la good con- 
dition. $hen rebuilt, its generator was tooted out by the sanufaeturer. 
a new eteaa end (turbine) for the other 300 I.W. unit would put it In first 
class condition and would improve the efficiency of the plant. The 100 
K. W. unit is of unsuitable also, and is in bad mechanloal condition. 
5. the three turbines are both rated and built for but 7 ifc. aack 
pressure, and the ratings stated above are reduce^ as the required back 
pressure for the present underground piping is Increased . Ac the sexless 
back pressure to soot the present load la 22 lb. 9 there la a falling off 
of generator capacity of fros 15 % to 20$ depending on the varying load 
under present operating osmdltione. 






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1. Whil* the turbine* are standing up under the maximum back pres- 
sure, yet they were net built for that duty. 

2. transformer*. The total cap© city of receiving transformers is 
905 K.V.A. and the peak lead around 1(00 K.W. the average load for the 
year is 120 K.f. 

3. Switchboard. the Switchboard supplies 6-2300 volt 3 phase oou- 
stan* potential circuits and 2-6 ampere series street lighting circuits 
frost a constant current transforms r. There are 12 three-section slate 
panels with suitable equipment, including a total load watt-hour meter and 
a graphic total load watt-meter and oil circuit breakers of sufficient 
rupturing capacity for the plant or for connection to the public service 
lines, Where there are thwee phase low potential circuits in the build- 
ings the transformers are connected in open delta. 

4. Transmission Unas. Inch of the principal buildings has a 
transformer vault and received power from an underground tap. Under- 
ground circuits from the power house supply power to two distribution 
pits near the power house. the principal lines are as follows} Under- 
ground from power house pit direct to Stocfcb ridge Bead near Physics tab- 
oratory, 1800 foot. Overhead from powerhouse pit to lumber Shad pit 
(20G»), to Olmsted Bead ( 350' ), across Ferine (12<?')»to Goessmann tap (600'), 
to West fetperinent Station (300 » $, up Stoeknrldge Head to Infirmary tap 
(600« ) , total 2,175' . from this point along Stockbrldge Bead to Physics 
laboratory 0*50 f ), to end of underground lino (l25») t to French Hall tap 
(300* ), to Clark Ball tap (175»)» to Fernald Bell tap (350 1 ), to distri- 
bution center (Mathematics Building) (200»>, total 1 > 600' # Overhead 
from power house pit te South College tap (350»), to Drill Hall tap 

(5*5' ), to fhysieal Education (3*0*), to Veterinary Laboratory 0*75*), 
total 1,660". 



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J-706 x • 5 

l« frrwqt Ifcderfpround Steam 

Distribution Sretea. A ooasidsrable portion of the pree- 

eat underground installation of conduits and steam distribution piping, 
ae heretofore etated, wee installed la 1901, to which one or more additions 
woro made at later dates. 

2. The present condition of the insulation of the underground pipes 
Is Tory unsatisfactory. It was installed at a time when little was known 
about such work* 

3 # The efficiency of the present pipe covering is probably frees than 
50$, although in these calculations It has been conceded that that figure 
amy bo assumed ae e o aa wh ere nearly correct, 

k. from Appendix *£* conservative calculations of heat losses from 

the present underground eteaa pipes places the amount between lV> and 150 
horse power, and it mast be kept in mind that inasmuch as eteaa ie always 
on the underground piping system, that this loss remains practically con* 
stand throughout the year — nights, Sundays and vacations — ae the ground 
temperature does not vary greatly from 50° *t all seasons of the year. 
5. Hpe insulation of the present day may be conservatively taken ae 
W0$ to $54 efficient, ae against a possible efficiency of 50 t in the p res- 
ent plant. See appendix "D-a* and *»-**. 




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J-706 

IXCf 101 IX 

BtJILOXKfc OIMOI 



1. geatlng. A complete record of the present Heating, process 
and Hot fater load la all Ilia building* connected to the central beating 
plant, will oo found in Appendix "I*. 

2. K nuaibsr of the buildings *re shipped with a tingle thermostat- 
ically controlled main ctcam valve. In the smaller buildings, where 
properly i no tailed, theoe say he reasonably effect ivo in controlling the 
general building temperature, hut in the larger buildings it la Impossible 
to control or oh tain a uniform temperature from hut onj| point. Thlt re- 
sults la the rooms on the eol<t aide of the buildings becoming too cold 
where the the mot tat Is located on the wars sida of the building, or the 
reverse ao the case say ha. 

3. Xa nnny of the huildlaga overheating of the rooms seems to he 
the rule, and In these cases the steam ares sure carried on the piping sye- 
tec should he reduced to the tsinimusi possible, thua effect lag savings la 
steam. This amy he readily of fee tod by frequent adjustment of the single 
reducing pressure valve with which each building heating main is supplied. 
**. Omeccmena Laboratory Bu^dlag t Unequal heating of the rooms 

la especially noticeable in this building. ftie thermostat controlling the 
direct radiation in the e n ti r ebuilding is located in a small roosi directly 
ever the beseasent space, in which all the sterna piping, valves, ete. from 
the underground supply &f<t located. 3u«h an atrasgoHient mateee it impos- 
sible to secure any control of temperature at all satisfactory. 
5. Another location for the thermostat should be found, one afford- 

ing an average temperature of the entire building. Such a locution can 
ha found only by experiment, as is always the ease where such a system ae 
this sort is Installed. Xt is not a suitable control system for such a 
largs building. 






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1. la this building (a 2-pipe, 2-*»ive, 2 lb. eteam system) * great 
improvement in beating results and in the caving of steam, mould bo effected 
by installing thermostatic traps cm each radiator return, and * Direct Con- 
trol valve on the principal rmdiatore, or on orifice plate In the steam 
oonneotion to each radiator , using the present radiator valves. 

2. Direct Control valves should be installed en five radiators In 
the Auditorium, and an the radiator in Boon 101. 

3. Steaa at JO to *40 lb. pressure is required in this laboratory 
an order to properly curry on the educational work. Only loo pressor* 
steaa is available, however. 

k. In nil the larger buildings two or sore thermostat s, if of the 

design described shore, should hare boon installed, and the steam amine 
also suitably Installed for their use. A farther study should bo undo 
of uuny of the buildings with this end in view. 

3. Physical Kducatioa Building ?he heat ins plant in this build- 
ing una the latest to bo inotalled, and in general nay bo said to bo the 
best Installation on the eaapue. Mors radiation nas provided than *as 
necessary — especially in the athletic portion, or "cage** so called. 
6. In tan main portion of thin building, the system of tfcermos- 
tatie control Is one of the boot; in fact it is the only complete system 
of Its kind in any of the buildings. Steam may be eared, however, by 
sotting the thermostats for lower room temperatures in many of the rooms* 
•Phe "eugo" rarely needs to be kept at a higher temperature than %* to 55* 
7* Memorial Building. On the day this building nas examined, the 

entire building nas overheated. 

g. Apparently a too high steaa pressure for heating one being carried, 

whieh wae controlled by a single thermoetat of the type dasoribed above. 
9. Direct control valves placed on half of the radiators would rem- 
edy this difficulty. 



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X. Smith College Ball din*. This building is overheated In 
portion* and underheated In other*. 

2. It to understood that a now Administration Building io toon to 
ho hullt and tho present building remodeled for dormitory purposes. When 
thii tt done, an entire now hooting lnotallation should bo considered, 
therefore bo recommendations aro made for tho improvement of tho prosont 
heating installation. 

3. Io temperature control for tho hot water tank was Imstollod. 
This should ho remedied. 

h. torttl CpUm SaWlM. *• understand that tho heating In- 
stallation In this building was recently made. Xt is controlled from a 
sing l e thermostat and the heating results throughout are uncertain and 
to a degree, unsatisfactory. Sons portions of the building aro over- 
heated and others aro cold at one and tho sojas time. 



5. In ocas of tho rooms the radiator* aro too small and in others 
are not located to obtain proper results. 

6. A single thermostat control would scarcely be expected to prop- 
erly serve this building. Additional radiators or larger radiators should 
be considered for tho following rooms s 

#1 Hot enough radiation 

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7. Additional radiators placed in the corridors — especially at 
the north and west sides of tho building, would aid in more uniform build- 
ing heating. 






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#•706 



IX -u 



• 



1. A careful study of all the rooms would probably result In find- 
ing rooms other than those mentioned needing more radiation and In others 
some of the present radiators could he reduced In else. 

2. foTtWtural M*i^aotur}n|g Building, So far as heat control 
is concerned, this Building Is the worst offender found by us — at least 
it was on the day of our examination. The waste of steam (for heating 
the building) amounts to considerable. 

3. Mechanically, the installation is one of the host examined, 
hut top much radiation was installed everywhere in the building , with 
no effective control other than hy hand, which in a building devoted to 
its present use, is rarely effective in results. 

U. fho remedy is to install on a number of the radiators Direct 
Control valves, of which there are a number cm the market. These can 
he installed at a cost of about $20 a radiator, probably loss if the 
work is done hy your own mechanics. The rooms affected are listed he- 



low. 



number of radiators to 



pfoom m$» 


Stumer 

la tort 


of Bad- 


which Direct Control 
valves shouM he attached; 


1 




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3 


2 




6 




3 


100 




3 




2 


101 




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102 




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103 




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Bomber of radiator* to 
Ihrtber of Sad- ehich id root Control 

no 3 l 

ill 3 1 

lit t 1 

Total nufifeer of radiators to which Direct Control 

reives should be attached 21 

getinated coot, at $1$ one* $31?. 

lettemted coot, at 130 each *nao. 

1. The of foot of aaklag this control valve Installation nnuld be 
aenlfeet at once, resulting in nere eoafortable boating condition* aid a 
loner etea* eeneujentien. 

2. nloro Blolodrlonl Ballsing . The instantaneous eater heater bee 
no temperature control. 

3. President* o genua. Thte building has a 6o-«al. bet enter tank 
with no teantmture control. 

n. Wilder Hall. fun lfolyeke Inetantanoone Heater baa no theme- 
etatle control. 

5. Mntbeemtlcal Bnlldlng. The preeenre reducing mire if not In 
working order. 

6. Feraald Hall. The hot enter tank bae no temperature control. 

7. ndano fall. fbte bae In nee an Instantaneous bet enter beater, 
a storage type beater should be installed in tble building. 

8. |raner flalU fble building alee ban an instantaneous bet enter 
beater. It ehenld bare a large storage type ten*. 

9. a f ronamv laalnasrlng Building, tne bet enter tank to in very 
poor condition, ae It le leaking around tannings and ••ana. 




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J-706 XI - 6 

1. Wftor MW-K j^pjjj * simplif led and unified sys t«f of 
control may be adopted, both for those described above and the other lar- 
ger buildinge, which will reduce the cost of operation end maintenance , 
Improve the comfort in the buildings, end rednee the amount ef steam need. 
This need not disturb or Interfere with present control equipment, bat 
would permit the regulation of heat end uee of steam from e Central Heat- 
ing Plant. 

2. floors each building hae an independent system of control, It It 
likely to become inoperative or require a considerable maintenance eoet. 
Being Independent of proper control , it often doee not meet the require- 
ments of comfort and ueee more eteam than necessary. 

3. Of the total radiation, about 137,672 square feet are in twelve 
of the larger buildinge. fheee buildinge require under the present eye- 
ten, cone thing over 500 lbs, of steam per square foot per year, or about 
68,000,000 lbs., at a fuel eoet of approximately $2** ,000. ftcperleace 
indicates that SO percent of thle amount, of $fei€0. night be eared annual*? . 
H. the reducing waive in each of these buildinge would be replaced 
or supplemented by an electrically operated pressure-regulating walwe con- 
trolled from the chief engineer's office or other central point. In or- 
der to mare this fully effective, an orifice would be placed in the supply 
of each radiator. 

5. There ar9 already low voltage wires from a central point to each 
of these buildings and similar vires would bs used for the purpose ef neat 
control. Inch valve mechanism would be removable by one man in a few min- 
utes, so that a spare mechanism could bo carried to insure perfect contin- 
uity of service. these would constitute the only moving parte which might 
possibly gst out of order* or as there would be but one of those la most of 
the buildinge, with not mere than two In any building, this would reduce 



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J-706 It - 7 

the maintenance to a negligible amount. It would eliminate radiator 
trap (seinteaanoe satire!?, as under smximum conditions, bo steam would 
be ell owed to paes beyond the red later. 

1, The connection* of theee control velvee are simpler than too 
noual typo of control valve — no by-peeseo being rehired , and steam 
nay be taken op to 125 ***• preeeure and reduced to radiator pressure 
without wire drawing or other objectionable result*. 
P. this system can bo extended to groups of smeller buildings, 

but the desirability of so doing can thus bo demons t rated by applying 
the system first of all to the larger buildings. This should greatly 
reduce the operating and minor maintenance costs and make calls duo to 
discomfort loos freeuent. 

1. two coot of the eeuipment would amount to approximately $1,000 
per building, and while the earing la operating and maintonanco would 
justify this Investment, the annual sawing in fool would alone giro a 
substantial return. Bewever, the prime object is to improve the com- 
fort of toe occupants. 

U. nausntsnnftsnui BfUtt l»»W«n»lf« I* *• roconmoadod that 
consideration bo given to the adoption of a standard system of heating 
to bo Installed In all new and remodeled buildings. directions to this 
end should bo giwea all Architects before planning their work, 

5. Creator comfort will bo obtained at less cost of steam. 

6. Talves and traps for radiators would thus be of standard de- 
sign and make and interchangeable, This would not interfere with re* 
cui red competition. Parts could be oarried in stock and installed by 
the college mechanics. 

7. There are at present in uee in the several bulldinge at least 
five systems of heating and ventilation and for heating the domestic 
watsr supply, whereas one or two at the most could better serve the 






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ktm* *9mm**a.t*m torn yii»»nf ** ****** *& vita* Jtas t a»}iblijrf -xm 

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• 



J-706 IX - 

College and greatly sia$>lify the heating pleat. 

1. ftyqcqss^eam Ifrauirementfr,,, An effort should he mode to stand- 
ardise and remodel all of the equipment mow ine tailed for furnishing pro- 
oeee •team la all the building* where such le rehired In order to avoid 
waste of steam. 

g. At present, considerable eteaa le wasted through heating eater 
or other solutions by injecting steam directly into the liquid to ho 
heated, 

3. By the installation of steam Colls or other devieee with the 
return* therefrom returned to the holler plant return system of piping 
can be used, changes should ho undo in the present Installations in the 
interest of economy. 

k. Postostlc .'afotsr Heating It will he found generally mare econ- 

omical to heat wattr for domestic us© in all the buildings hy steam from 
the central steam plant, than to use electricity for the purposo. 
5. At present this Is not in ewsry ease possible, owing to the 
present inadequate underground piping Installation, out when a new cen- 
tral plant Is provided, this should he taken Into consideration. 
S, In laboratories where v*ry exact water and solution tempera- 
tares ars required, or where the cost of delivering steam for the purposo 
would dc prohibitive, then consideration should he given to the uee of 
electricity for heating purposes. 




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SlOflOV XII 

1. 1* analysing the coat of the proposed installation of conduit, 
piping, boiler plant mad building changes, both steam and electric, there 
arc too prime cons Ida rat Ion 6 to which attention Is drawn in this section 
of the report. They ore: 

Capital Investment 
Cost of Operation 

2. Under the first caption a description of and estimate of In- 
stallation cost of the hi£h pressure (100 lb.) distribution lino follows: 

ffKAM SUfiTKlBtrrtOI — 100 SB. »SX§S0« 

3. fho proposed underground lines are indicated on the drawings, 
their location shown approximately whore the connections to the present 
and future buildings are likely to bo the shortest. 

U. fho colored lines indicate the pressure to bo Carried and the 
sisoo of conduit and pipes are clearly marked. 

5. All possible condensation from both process and heating steam 
meed in the buildings lo to be returned to the boiler plant. 

6. Hie exact locations and tlses are subject to such changes am 
might he found necessary In making actual working drawings, but the cost 
would not he materially affected thereby. 

7. Under this system the working steam pressure has been assumed 
as 100 lb. at the boiler plant with a pressure drop to 20 lb. at the 

end of sections "B* and *8" when delivering steam at 70$ of the full con- 
nected load — present and future, ewer the next 2$ years. Should the 
load at any time exceed the 70$ demand, a "tie* line across the far end 
of the campus, Section C, would serve to equalise the pressures In all 









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J-T06 in - 2 

parts of the high pressors system, this tie lias, with proper valvlng 
Is sil sections, would permit «f repairs to any of the main lines and 
connections by routing the stews from the tetter plant, either through 
Section •*• or •©*. 

1. prevision for the considerable expansion in these lines has 
seen provided for in the eamutttatiean ug to 100 lb. steam pressure. All 
pipe voile weald he welded. Expansion is to he provided for by the use 
of eopper ^hillows 41 type Joints , seasiless and welded into the piping, 

2. Sections »w« and *F* have been indicated for the use of steam 
at 80 H. pressure, that advantage nay he taken for heating the farm 
and Poultry building e from the boiler feed pump and f oread draft fan 
turbine exhanet. These ulnar liaso serve hut few buildings. 

3. this system presupposes the purchase of slectrie current for 
light end power. 

k m the advantageeuef so doing would hot 

a. ffc* present turbines and geaeratere would thus become 
solely a •standby" plant, to be used only la the emergen- 
cy of loss of current from ts» street lines of the Public 
Utility Co. , on which occasions the Company would operate 
the plant. 

thus the present turbines and generators would nerve for 
at leant 15 years — probably also, without increase in 
capacity, for in the few short emergency periods some of 
the usual dammads for current could be dispensed with. 

b. the present boiler plant life would probably be extended 

a few yearn, although In either event its efficiency would 
not he Increased over the present. 



s - I 



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JHT06 til - 3 

In operation, the present boiler pressure ef 150 Id. 
would be dropped to 100 lb. to Meet the very cold leather 
deaaad and to ear preeeare bolo^f 100 lb. , Recording to 
the weather — possibly to ae lew ae 30 lb. or to even 
leee during the suaaer aoaths. 

1. file estimated installation cost of the abase let 

Per underground installation, eee appendix »»G* $157,09*. 
for changes in boiler pleat plpln* 1*^780^ 

fetal ttoi,e7S. 

2. from aa laepeatloa of the plea and appendix *£* , it will be 
obeerved that the eetlaatae here been subdivided for nee la the event of 
bat a portion of the work being iae tailed at once. 

3. It it strongly urged, however, that the firet laetallatloa 
includes Sections "A* aad *B*, ae the present underground laetallatloa 
along the fteet &Mea le both laadeenate la else aad condition. These 
two llaee can be operated at high pressure aad the reamiader of the era- 
tea ae at preeeat y bat without great eenaoay. 

H. fae high preeeare eyntea of eteaa heating involves else eare- 
ful consideration of the eleetria deaaude, which will be referred to 
later la this report. 

jw/w w*^wmf#M axaaa wiaxBjnijTiSei 
flOTPT (20) PCWHDS 

5. the drawing eubaitted also shows the low pressure lines, with 
the elsee of conduits, eta. clearly amrfced. 

6. Inasmuch aa process eteaa pressures aa to Uo lb. are required 
la all the principal buildings, an to aad including Oeeesnann laboratory, 
It haa been considered accessory to laatall a aeparate hl^h pressure 
(100 lb.) liae to that point. 



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J-706 XIX - k 

1. In addition to serving the pwtwt *M future bulldinge ©long 

the Horth Ridge so called, villi medium pressure steam, such a line would 
also be tied into the new low pressure lino to serve la Iteeping up the 
rehired pressure for heating. With this low pressure steam ape tarn, as 
in the ease of a high pressure installation, all condensation la to bo 
returned to the holler plant. 

fc. The holler and electric generating plant charges Involved ares 
a. Any economical electric generating plant will require 
at least 150 lb. stoma pressure. 

all the present hollers now carry that pressure, hut is 
time this will have to he lowered, due to the agoing units. 
The present tubular holler is now United to 150 lb. and 
probably will ho the first to ho replaced with a holler 
of another typo. 

Whoa that tlaa arrivee seme remodeling of the boiler house 
should ho seriously considered, as previously referred to 
la this report, 

fbe present tubular holler limits the pressure on the en- 
tire plant. The other boilers could otherwise carry 200 

lb. pressure, which would effect about %g£ greater economy 

electric 
la steam generation. 

Replacement of these hollers due to the necessary cutting 
down of allowable pressure t would bo deferred probably for 
their full life 1£ electricity is purchased and the steam 
pressure for heating and process only; dropped to 100 lb. and 
less. 
h. The present electric generating plant has been fully des- 
cribed hereinbefore. 






a«ela «fee<t*fl»e* •vfntfft Ant *o»«««f «& irfvtee tftM nl 

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.snir**©** tteesle ,dX ■<X JaeeX 
if letf ( fmretrtyf fact* <$n** «ti eveUee* ** »• »'> - 
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1Mb* t/rr iff H plflftUM ftBM *•****! igt* :; v ; r: '••' 
c* ftsr- '*tiP»l¥*Yf «« t fce<T*&*e«m© tie***?** ••* htm#* 

-are fitfi* «o $<ieetr*c ell*: adtof foee**?? «tfff 

JNftN -f^faer* 3£| tend* Jartte &Ia** rtelffw ( iwii^ .#* **& * ? v * f 

&Htvm tmiilil en* el eaft *- ♦/'!««' ea*** V 



• 



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• 




• 



j-706 Hi - 5 

It it probable that ixttnilTf changes and addition* 

will be required la the plant within the next three te 

fire years, depending upon bow rapidly the electric 

demands lncraaaa. 

A new 500 X.l. unit should raplaea the praaant 100 I.w. 

malt. 

Changes will alaa be rehired la the present switchboard. 

1. The cetiaated aaat far the iastallation of the conduit and law 
pressure steaa lines, together with tha plant Changes, fallawat 

Conduit aad piptag. Saw Appendix «G« $199, a?l. 

Bailar plant ohangen — at aaaa 600. $199 ,««1. 

fitaia 1 ta 5 years, 

Oaa 500 K.f. generator wait with 

faaadatleas, piping, face, a to. 2q f 0tXL 

fatal aapltal laveetaeut, aad af 5 yaars $224,881. 

At aad ef IQ years,, a eacond 500 t.t. 

generator aait $25,000. 

Oaa 200 I.f. bailar aad setting 10,000. 

Piping far boiler and tnrMae ^.000. *t0 r 000. 

investment ^ 

fatal capital/at and ef 10 years |26fc,881. 

2. Whan this is dona consideration should be given ta other changes 
la tha bailer plant as rseosssendad previously ia this report. 




: *■■■•■' -'■' ■■-• ■■■■•■*■ •"■ 






.* .',.,/■•;■■ .4'i^ .. 

* 



• 



• 




• 




J-706 *tt - 6 

oa&mtm or tm cost or aswrnjaiB rases ?<jicka5*d *0i» 

1. IrtWfttM Iff *°T«« **•*• **• *** ****•*» which exercise * 
determining influence upon tills comparison: 

(a) tfhe close coincidence of the heating lead and the elec- 
tric load throughout the year. This make* t%« extra 
cost chargeable to electric current very low. 

(b) The long distances from the stsam boilers to many of the 
building* , which makes a high f trot cott for the Instal- 
lation of a new low pressure underground piping system, 
and a silently ftlg&er fixed underground loss, ao com- 
pared with a system of high proosuro piping. 

2. The principal items of eoot for generated power above those 
which are necessary for steam heat, are ae follows? 

(1) Steam looe to too atmosphere with a new, installation, when 
the power requirement exceeds the heat requirement. See 
Appendix "B*. fith the preeent installation, this loss 
la negligible. 

(2) feat taken from the steam (la B.t.u.) between the supply 
proosuro of 150# ana 75* superheat , and the exhaust con- 
dition of 15# saox pressure. 

(3) tabor. 

(U) Bxtre Investment for low pressure distribution as compared 
with hi^h pressure distribution. 

(5) Extra underground looses for low proosuro steam. Appen- 
dix *B*. 

(6) Maintenance and repairs of generating plant, oil and water. 

(7) fixed charge for now equipment. 



I - -- - I 



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HMI ItWWfim Mfr Iff! t tMNfM0W *ff AMI %0£I %• •tl»»fl% 

off* .»»•*• ru»t*Y<f «•! *•! *«9sol kwiynAair ****£ (< 



• 





j-706 III - ? 

1. The following is a comparison between the cost of generated 
power under present conditions and the cost of purchased power. 

2. Present Cpsts j 

(X) Exhaust steam discharged to atmosphero $ 210. 

(2) Heat in l.t.u. t taken from the steam 

exhausted into the heating system 1,550. 

(3) I*bor 6,8X0. 
(k) Maintenance, repairs, oil and water 1,375. 
(5) Fixed charges r pQO 

*9,9*5. 

3. Cost of purchased power 121,650. 

U, The above costs of generated power do not include items which 
are fixed and would not he sawed If power were purchased. 

AHALTSIS Of GPXHATW6 COSTS 

fiTg vmcwum ctmssxt asb sxsbbated cram. 

5. The following is s comparison of costs when underground loeses 

have been reduced by the Installation of new piping and insulation. The 

comparison is based on three assumed load conditions, as follows; (See 

Appendix •*•). Col. X CoX. 8 Col. 3 

Present Lead In 3 Tsars In 10 Tears 

UtUm g.M„ U^iW W. a .000.000 ™ 

(1) Steam lost to ths 

Atmosphere $1,575. *2,000 $3,000. 




(2) 


fuel cost for heat taxsn 
from the steam 


1,^50. 


1 J**o. 


2,320. 


(3) 


labor 


6,310. 


6,810. 


6,810. 


00 


fixed charges for the extra 

cost of Xow pressure piping (10$) 3,800. 


3,300. 


3,300. 


(5) 


Increased underground losses 
?» r ifil pressure piping 


962. 


96a. 


962. 



I . - ■ II 



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j-706 m - 1 

Carried forward tt*,597. *X5,312. 8X6,892. 

(6) Kelntenanee t supplies and 

ropalre I,3T5. X,650. 2,200. 



(7) fixed charges OB Hew ttqaipssat 



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|X7,X72. 120,7X2. $28,8*12. 

(8) Coot of Purchased fewer $21,650. $25 ,980. *3*,30O. 

Balance la favor of 

generated Current $H,*t7*. 15,268. $5,**58. 

X. The cost of purchased power le based oft the price submitted 

by the power company la the faXl of X93X, ead presumably le subject to 

farther negotiation. 

HtCfMfl UStSIlOflOl 

2. Changes la the electric distribution are aot ooftsidered eseea- 
tlal at the present time, bat the replacement ef the present overhead 
lines with underground construction Is desirable. It will reduce mala- 
teuance, make interrupt lea loss likely aad improve appearance. 

3. The pole lines would bo Installed slang the priacip&l driveways 
oa the Berth, Bast aad West Sidles. 

k. U nfam Wit, »*«** <» «*• «*• of ffcrkway Cable , the es- 

timated coet would be ae folXowa, including 2300 volt cable, street light- 
ing cable aad boll aad signal cable laid underground with *9pua $raalte" 
poles aad ornamental lighting units spaced 150 ft. 

Section A - 2,175 t%. m t*t,300. 

Section 1 - 1,60Q ft. a 3, HO. 

Section 9 - 1,660 ft. * JulSS. *X0,560. 
5. flfrrf Conduit Installation. A much more satisfactory construc- 
tion for the 2300 volt service would bo rscosisended , consisting of four 
(U) ducts of 3j* fibre conduit laid la concrete with concrete manholes. 



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*-iaS in - 9 

the signal cable Alto would fee placed 1b conduit spaced 12* from the 
power cable, fhls would make tho total costs as fellows; 

Section A - 3,175 *t. • $6,275. 

Section B - 1,600 ft. m ^,5X0. 

Section » - 1,660 ft. « H^TI $15,^0. 

S V If H A F T 

1. trots the above analysis of operating cost* with both generate* 
and purchased electric current, it sill be observed that 1b each assumed 
operating condition, that, at tint charge proposed a* this time fey the 
Public Utility Company, tho balance lies 1b favor of manufactured current. 

2. The choice resolve t Itself, therefore, late whether the College 
Is willing to make the Capital Investment necessary 1b view of the profc- 
Bhle saving to be mode la operating east, or will It contract tw elec- 
tric currant and Ireep the installation cost at the lower figures stated? 

nCaFXTOUTIOl 0T CAPITAL lavTOftinr 

High pressure underground Installation — 

purchased electricity $161,878. 

Low pressure ditto — BaBufaotured electricity 

f£§sej£| fa 5 yaarf If W n^f 

#199»ial. $22U,g«l. $a6a,ssi. 

Heating changes — 1b Buildings fro* 18,000 ta $13,000. 

Underground electric current distribution: 

la Parkway Cable $10,560. 

In flhre Conduit $15,360. 

3. It is ear Belief that la slew of changes In the holler pleat, 
laawlamale la the next fifteen years, that ae great or greater satis- 
faction will he secured frosi the purchase of electricity froa an outside 

source. 



dot-* 

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III - 10 



1, The esttmatee of installation costs ara sufficiently accurate 
for the purpose of this report. 

2. Closer esttaates of coat can bo secured when working drawlnge 
ore made and actual aids taken in competition from contractors. 



• 



Respectfully Submitted, 




AiFKIJ XHLOH 




• 



ax/l 



ic -in 

.tac^** tJtft* to *8t 







• 



• 



Appendix, Sheet "A* 
PRESOCST CHXMHXT ASD BOILTO PUHT 

*• Chimney it H«-0» x loO 1 -©" , hutlt hy the Alphons Custodis 
Chimney Construction Co, In 1917 or 1918. 

2. The holler t In the order of their location and age arei 

#1 * Heine Water Tohe - 1919, Biting U00 HP 

#2 - Dillon Horiiontal Return ?lin 

lubular - 1915 • CH{J » 

#3 - Heine Hater Tube - 1922, • 1*00 • 

#J* - Heine Hater Tohe - 1923, " *<00 ' 

Total rated horsepower ^ R 

3* Fuel . Penn. Bituminous, frooi Soman Slope Sean. 

Carbon - 1& 

Volatile- 20£ 

Ash - 6.7* 

Btu - 1U,600 

Cost . Per ton, 22*40 lb, delivered, $7.0U 
U. lach holler ie equipped with a foster Superheater, which at 

150 lh. pressure has a capacity to provide 30° to 100* superheat. 



. 



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titter; ;•■,.•■;• ;!'■■ .■ v-.:. ■' ; lad ' 



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PLAHT RECORD OF TUSL, SWOBATIOif , TIMPXRATURS AMD KW H00B8 



Appendix, Sheet *B M 




• 






Coal la 


Hater Jhrep. 




Average 




Month 


Tons 


In lbo. 




Temperature 




1928 
April 


619.86 




63,610 


42.9 




May 


464 


t-A 


63,662 


55.2 




June 


395 


54,511 


62. 




July 


s 


52,939 


72.7 




August 


3^ 


10 


47,875 


70. 




September 


373 




51,680 


55.7 




October 


510 


72,065 
78,414 


52. 




Hovember 


642.3 


*I0.8 




December 


781.34 


^ • 


79,080 


31.6 




January 


912.25 


1? 

1 

* * 


93,549 


23.4 




February 


834.33 


89,122 


25.** 




Marc 


7^.59 

7,004.67 


ft.$9Q 

828,197 


37-8 

4^4 




1929 












April 
May 


SfcS. 




76,460 
73,880 

61,810 


45.5 

57.3 




June 


296.27 

261.08 




66.9 




July 




62,810 


70.2 
65.9 




Auguat 


217. 7* 
276.9 




57,640 




September 




63,720 


62.3 




October 


528.30 




90,240 


48.2 




November 


621.35 




90,909 


38.9 




December 


778.02 




83,280 


28. 


«u 


January 


804.4 




92,420 


25.7 




February 


7*4.08 




89,590 


29.5 




March 


.759. W 




.19,2*2 


3U 






6,328.18 




922,049 


47.8 


fvap. from 
and at 212° 


1930 










(Includeo blowdown) 


April 


531.28 
345.93 


11,403,314 


77,250 


44.1 


10.38 


ilay 


7,511,813 


76,500 


59. 


10.57 


Juno 


228.3 


4,557,^5 


62,814 


69.8 


io.a 


July 


216.21 


U,665,44l 


52,005 


£H 


10.03 


August 


190.27 


*f,*T*T f , JJoU 


43,935 


66.6 


11.25 


September 


215.57 


4,779,361 


51,810 


63.4 


10.72 


October 


475.23 


10,225,383 


83,365 


47.7 


10.43 


Hovember 


607.32 


12,738,785 


84 ,060 


39.2 


10.13 


December 


744.37 


17,643,986 


86,240 


27.9 


10.22 


January 


836.12 


98,030 
102,369 


22.9 

26.4 


10.19 


February 


733.35 


16,149,186 


10.55 


March 


T°3 t <* 


14.859.676 


101.220 


37.2 


KP.22 




5,826.99 


125,167,799 


919,598 


47.8 


10.408 kr m 


1931 












April 


484.4 


10,713,874 


95,070 


48. 


10.67 


u*y 


375.43 


*, 557,545 


89,910 


60.9 


11.09 


Juno 


260.08 


6,032,837 


68,437 


69.1 


11.23 


July 


251.71 


5,330,490 


65,370 


75.6 


10.28 


August 


210.7 


4,558,121 


55,620 


71.06 


10.44 


September 


264.43 


6,050,790 


70,010 


65.5 


11.09 


October 


472.16 


10,146,945 


105,391 


54.2 


10.44 


Hovember 


56S.45 


12,055.719 


ifii t 5io 


ffiLS 


*0,2? 




2,886.96 


6 3,496,52i 


651,398 


61. 11 


10.68 









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j-706 



Appendix, Sheet "C* 



BBAT LOSS 



man 



prsssnt vmsxmixmD iwhumzo* 



• 



i. 

2. 

h 

K 
5. 
6. 



7. 

8. 

9. 

10. 
11. 



Back Pressure Lino 
6# to 22# 

Max. pressure 22 # 3# 
Mia. • 6.3* 



28.6 + 2 m lH.3# Ave. 



2^8. U° TOiap. of oteaa 
50.0* ■ ■ ground 

198. U° say 200° Tempers ture 

Difference 



^50 Ua, ft. - 8* plpo - 200° m 1203 B.t.u. Loss/ft. * 5^1,350 

- 200* sj 1066 » • • •2,255,656 

- 200* m 923.7 ■ • ■ m 1,^39,125 
-200*. 775.5 • " • - 502,52* 
• aoo° . 697.2 • * ■ • i f 2U7 f 290 

- 200° & 627.9 - * " • 1,193,638 

- 200* m 558.1 ■ ■ * - 128,363 

- 200* . teS.S • ■ ■ » 825,583 

- 200* si **00.3 ■ • * * ^2,331 

- 200* « 331.5 * ■ • * m 2*K>,337 

- 200° « 183.H • • ■ • « f 170 



2,116 ■ 
1,558 

1,789 
1,901 

230 
1,689 
1,105 

725 
50 



-r 

-6« 
-5* 

-*• 

-3* 

- 2" 

- 1« 



a 
a 
a 
a 
a 
a 
a 



a 
a 



Total sj 8,825,367 B.t.u. lose 



L y, 14^ 



100# Pressure « 327.8° Temp, of Steaa 

50.0° * * Ground 



277.8° say 278° Soap, difference. 
968 Un. ft. - 2« pipe - 278° « 5^2.U B.t.m. toss/ft. * 525,0*3 B.t.u. Loss. 



ad8 t xl£a9<re& 



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Appendix, Sheet "O**" 



• 



# 



KSTIUATJSD mAX LOSS 
(Continued) 



SUMMARY 



Average pounds water returned to the boiler plant from U.G. mains * 10,^80 lb, 
per hour. 

12. fernp. return* at bldga. 212° Aeeumed 

13. ■ • at B. H. IJOl. ! 

lH # te* lose, and 

15. 10,^80 X k2 * >A0,l60 B.t.u. loss per hour. 

16. Then - Loss from present exhaust steam mains 8,825,367 B.t.u. loes per hour 

17. Ditto high pressure 525 .QU3 " * « « 

18. 9,350^10 

19. Value preeent insulation 50* U. 675 .205 • * « « 

20. H t 675,205 • ■ • « • 

21. Loss from condensation UU0.160 * « • e 

22. 5,115,365 • * * ■ 

23. Latent heat, say 1,000 B.t.u. m 5,115 lb. Steam 
2U. Equals 1^7 + boiler h.p. 



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J-706 



Appendix, Sheet *D* 



HIAT LOSS 

m 

HSf USOTBHOOT© IHSSALUTIOH 

X. Initial steam pressure 100 lb. with a drop to 20 lb. 

2 # Average temperature 339 » 253 * 300° - 50* « 250° 

2 B-t.m. TBQM BAKB PIPB8 

700 tin. ft. - 8* pipe - 250° * 1,66U.5 Lost/ft. * 1,165,150 

2,125 ■ - • 6" ■ - 250° * 1,278.1 ■ • - 2,715,962 

2,525 * ■ - 5" • - 250« m 1,073.0 ■ • - 2,709,325 
3. 1,000 » • - H* ■ -250 . 868.8 « ■ « 868 r 8oo 7,1*59,237 



XSmiATSB LOSSES 



u. 


Hew High 


Pressure line to be 


ine tailed together with 


5. 


the Low Pressure Line - Prop 


from 100 lb. to 80 lb. 




6. 


Average Temperature 338 ♦ -&k 

2 


• 331* - 50° p 280° 






700 Lin. 


ft. 


- k* pipe - 280* « 


1,038.9 Loss/ft. m 


727,230 




300 • 


« 


- 3j f * - 280° - 


923. * 1 * « 


277,020 




500 ■ 


s 


- 3" * - 280* i 


808.6 i ■ « 


i4OU,300 




lKX) * 


1 


- 2« • - 280° - 


5U8.H ■ ■ • 


219,360 


7. 


100 • 


1 


- l£« ■ - 280° * 


H39.0 * ■ m 


Hi .909 



1,671,810 



3, 



10. 



20 lb. initial to 12 lb. final pressure. 

Average temperature 260 » 2UH * 250* - 50° * 200° 



900 Lin. ft. 


- ik* pipe 


2 

• 200° « 


1,950 Loss/ft. * 


i,755,ooo 




600 * " 


- 12* ■ 


- 200* • 


1,780 • 


• m 


1,068,000 




,700 ■ • 


- 10« * 


- 200° m 


1,501.5 * 


• * 


2,552,550 




650 • * 


- 8« • 


- 200° * 


1,203 " 


* » 


781,950 




900 * • 


- 6* * 


- 200*. 


923.7 * 


• m 


831,330 


, 


650 H • 


- 5* « 


- 200° * 


775-5 f 


a m 


<50U r 07«S 


7,^2,9Q5 
9,l6U,7l5 





















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Appendix, Sheet "B-a" 

ESTIMATED BEAT LOSSES 
FROM TRS ]gl TmDSROROmiD INSTALLATION 

3aall a*lnt t Steam at 1QQ lb. Bo^er frgaaur* 

12. Lots from bare pipe. See Appendix *D* (3) 7,^59,237 

13. !>e«t 82.5$ efficiency of proper insulation 6,15^,870 
lU. Set loot from steam plpee 1*305,367 




.as in B.t.u. from condensation returned to boiler 

plant at full load (7(0 factor) See Appendix M X"(21) 

15. 58,873 1*. X 31.5* X (212 - 170) - 778 f 890 

16. Total B.t.u. loss 2,08*1,257 

17. Loss In pounds of eteam per hour 2,085 1». 

18. Equivalent loss per hour - horse power 60 

With Steam at 20 IK Stxhaust Pressure - Lsrgs Mains 

19. loss from hare pipe. See Appendix "J** (11) 9,l6U,715 

20. Less 82.5* efficiency of proper insulation 7 f ?60 f 82$ 

1,603,826 

21. Lose from condensation as in previous estimate, "D* (15) 778 f 890 

22. Total B.t.u. loss 2,382 f 7l6 

23. Total loss in pounds of steam per hour 2,382 lb. 
2k. Equivalent loss p^r hour - horse power 69. + 




HQMKU UMM H9 UIXM 

*oi?AjjATra (moor 

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•' ,?:T,X fcWitr •*»*« aufci •*•! i«M ,* : : 

) bscd XXcrTr $* }«*Xq 

f «dX 





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-X) *G» t ©**e - H * f HJ ffmttebaoo ubdYI tttJ ,XS 

4 .$$ vew&g taintf - T&oif ?»q seel *3©X*vlx#t 



% 




• 



Appendix, Sheet "D-b* 

139IMAT2D H£tt L0SS18 

Comparis on 
of underground pipe losses la percentage of average yearly loads; 

Present Installation 

25. fro* 1220 record W (23) TO „ 1*< «. 

««» (9) 10US8 

3*uture Installations 
From estimated future requirements with large pipea installed 
and 20 lb, (Exhaust) steam pressure* 

fS" (23) 21195 

Ditto with small F*P«* 
*&* 100 lb- steam pressure; 

27. ** (17> -MB « 9* f 

•*» (23) 21195 

Rote, The estimated thermal losses from the underground pipes, in 
both the present and future installations , would probably be about 
3% less, owing to the smaller process and building heating loads dur- 
ing Jul?, August and September and at night time. This cannot be 
accurately calculated from aay present records, and is not very im- 
portant in any calculation. See Appendix *C* (21), *&" (15) and 
?# (20). 




^*mm-vmm*m—~~ =. 



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Appendix, Sheet *1* 
SfUlf LOAD 1JC08D 

1. gvAgOBaTIQH. Calculation* of steam consumption, losses, etc., 
taken from College records for the year 1950, this being the only fall 
year recorded. PBE8SB! P L A » T 

Total Water Evaporated. 

?« r Year for lour 

2. 125,167,800 lb. lk,2BB lb. 

3. Total m1mm$ 31.5* 39,H27,*57 * ^,500 * 

**• Boiler plant lessee : (See note below) 

a. Blow down 3,650,000 lb. 

b. Engine exhaust 600,000 lb. 

c # Miseel. losses, 

leaks, etc. i y <ft?,Q0Q « 

Total 6,162,000 lb. 700 lb. 

5. Percentage of blowdown to aake-^jp l6# 

He te g Boiler plant losses arrived at as follows; 
The four boilers are in use — a total of HSO days per year, and 
each boiler is blown down 3 times in 2*1 hours. If blown down the cus- 
tomary single gauge (one actual gauge « 2,390 lb.) three times in 2H hours, 
there would be at least 

3 X 2350 S|| * 9,235 lb ? , say 10,000 lb. blowdown 
each 2U hours, or 3,650,000 lb. steam per year. 

The turbines exhaust to atmosphere to an appreciable extent from 
about June 15th to Sept. 15th. from station records this is conservatively 

assumed as 700 lb, steam per hour for 90 days, or say 500,000 lb. Dar- 
ing the remainder of the year the wests to atmosphere from the turbines may 
be considered negligible. 

Miscellaneous losses Include boiler blow-off when cutting a boiler 
into the line and leaks through the plant piping, traps, etc. 



asoon u u a * ? a 

o ertd snivel 0001 €>3*aXX«0 avrl motet 

3 a a S * 



t#5 

„ ....... . -— 

Aff ^ l^ff f\&6 0£t cot Mff 

. • ■ , ■ Jjsotf* 

JH i#B*cf ,r u* ■■-":' MVtt MMifNWiM tl •#••1 itf;J 1%*% Mil It Ml* ? '■.•:. - ■-.■«/ . •- 7 

♦•X«ff 
it- ' 



♦ 




• 




r jqc Appendix, Sheet "t-a* 

SSSAtt LOAD KEC0&D 
Maximom Steam Demand 

6. for 2k hour period, foe. 17, 1930 m 690,739 lb. 

7. **r hour 2SJ80 lb. 

8. Peak hour - 5 p.m. to 6 p.m., fob. 1, 1930, U0,000 lb, 
Pounde of Steam Delivered to the building (average) for beating 
water and for process requirements} 

9. lU,2gg - (1*500 - 700f « 1O,U08 lb. per hour, average. 

*°« Fouuda of Condensation Eoturned to the boiler plant, yearly average, 

lU,2gg lb. - H,500 lb. m 9,7** lb. per hour. 
**• |tatio f Pounds Condenaation Betoraed to pounds steam delivered, 

-£•*& - 31.5)1 

Total Connected Heating and process loads, 1930, 

12. 162,1*00 sq. ft. (Physical Education 31dg. not included) * 

Per hour »I0,600 lb. 

13. Ratio. Maximum Single Hour Demand to connected load, practically 100& 
lK Satio. Maximum 2U-gour Demand to connected load 28 r 780 m 70$ 4. 

Uo,6oo 

15. Batio . Average Hourly load to maximum 2^ hour demand !Q t tySff . 36* * 

28,7*8 * 

f tJTURS LOAD AIB DEMAND 

16. Connected load 1931 - 19V**1 •«• ft - (including Physical Education Bldg.) 

17. Equal e Ug ,060 lb. steam ^«r hour 

Assumed total connected load duo to Increase in number of buildings, 
etc. over the next 20 to 25 years, which period may also be assumed 

as the probable useful life of a new underground installation, as follows: 

18. Present load 192,2*11 

19. Probable future load, 755* lUU f 18Q 

20. Equals gU,105 tfe* 

prob- 



Hote; The lesser amount of steam condensed in the new underground. 
piping , has not been taken Into consideration in computing tie 



able demand. 






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J-706 Appendix, Sheet *»-1d* 

STEAK LOAD R2C0RD 

21. Applying present 2k hour demand of 

70$ ■ Steem per hour 58,87*4 lb. 

22. leunl to 1)706 boiler h.p. 
S3* implying faetor for average demand over a year, 

58 ,87* * M * 2 M95 Xo. 
2*. »<|ual« 615 boiler h.p. 

ftoad Distribution . According to the assumed degree of Increase 
In load ever the probable life of a new underground steam distribution 
system of piping, the load would be apportioned as follows: 

25. Present connected load 192,2Ul so. ft. 

26. Assumed Increase over 20 to 25 ?•*? ported , 

75* •* eJfteJB • * 

27. Total 336,^21 ■ • 

28. Assumed that l/3 of the increase will come 

along the West Ridge, or Ug,o6o sq. ft. and 

2/3 along the East Bidge and Farm Buildings, 
or 96,120 sq. ft, 

29. Then, present load on tost Ridge lino 

30. Plus Increase 

31. fotal 

32. Present load on East Ridge lino 

(Boiler plant to point *S* 
33 • Plus Increase 

J>. fletal 

Jij. Pans and poultry buildings 

plus bollor and turbine house 

36. Plus increase 

37. fotal 

38. fotal, ultimate connected load in to,, ft. of 

Xeulralent Badlatlon 

39* Pounds of steam per hour 

Ho. Pounds of steam per hour at 70$ load faetor 

kl. Xeuals, in boiler homse power 



60,663 


M « 


W! ,950 


. 




108,723 sq. ft. 


119,^5 




«7t7P3 


• 




207 ,188 * • 


n,379 










20.TO* * 




336**21 s«. ft. 




8* ,105 lb. 




5,887 1». 




IJ06 



to fcn«sffiel> tit .££ 

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• ■ :-. m 

M ■:■-■ aal sxrXI 
*« TfTtiwm © 

: ' .■:■■ 

xtmd *©q s*©Ja lo ijtoaff 
t©#o*l ©*©X ^0T ** ixroif t*q = ««J» t© ©.taut* .04* 

r c»Xnirpf 



% 



Appendix, Sheet "1* 



• 



• 



BfCOKD 07 FKE3SMT SUWPIHa, PBOCBS3 AND HOT WATER LOAD 



BOILKB PLABT TO POUT ♦'A* 



lUILDIBO 


BADlATIOir 
|| 1*. 


UHCOYOTD 

MAIH5 

ADD 

<«' 


TOTAL 

HXATIBG 
OKLT 


PROCESS 
STEAM 

lbs. kl»* # i». 

DIR. BAD. 


ROT WATBB 
LOAB 

iq.H.fT 

DIR.BAD. 


TOTAL WU 
DIR, BAD, 

8^ FT. 


HORf.SflPORS 


2,112 


28# 


2J20 


517 


2,06s 


115 


^,903 


nm lab. 


3,130 


27* 


3,99** 


1,200 


U,800 


312 


9,106 


3T0CKBFIDGR HALL 22,268 


20* 


26,721 


690 


2,760 


270 


29,751 


DRAPER HALL 


2 f U6l 


20 


3,160 


862 


3,HU8 


2,082 


8,690 


GOE8KAI LAB. 


12 ? 86? 


21* 


15,675 


862 


3 f UU8 


222 


19,3*5 


ffXSf EXF. STA. 


2,135 


20 


2,750 


172 


688 


100 


3,53« 


ABIGAIL ADAMS 
HALL 


3,053 


27* 


3,900 








2,777 


6,677 


R0US891AS 


525 


30* 


682 








50 


732 


BAST S3P, 3TA # 


HS6 


30* 


632 








50 


682 


mom nwm 


35* 


30* 


60.67* 


**.303 


T, 


6.378 


fisft 


TOTAL 


17.212 


83. 88U 



% m Allowance for uncovered sains and risers adopted by tJ. 8. Treasury Dept. 




w 



ttadj f 



OH eiXQOg* , OHITAIH 



^0 SHOOK 






♦ 



«P« JA90T 
,0tt .SIC 


CLA&I 

f*.Pt.i 


4 » * 


J 


IHtfDOM 

i 

(2) 


.Wl J5? 


Mftxnm 


CoM 


en 


' ?; V 


Tie 


ORT, 


3?*S 


SI 


SffQ^.TBOH 


aox,e 


txc 


M f 4 


4 , 




*TS 




. ■ ' ••;,.; 


xeY,** 


OTfi 


oa\. 




• 


*os 


\ ' /• .: w- -: r '— x-n- 


. 








oai, 


$8S 


I . 








*&*«£ 




* f ?i 


Jtis 


. 


, 


B^f 


1 






0?V 


^11 


■ , 


. ". ' , : • • 


TTM 


TTT. 


— , 


- — 


ooe,c 


^TS 






T 


o? 


— 


•m 


SSd 


4. 


0g 


ttCftSMfl 




oe 


— 


~ 




^ 


w 


... . r : ?: •.:•: 


on... 


LJ . 


TT 






*oc 


■ 




^sa,^a 


SY£*3 


iTI 





• 



•#q«C vur8&&'i? .8 , d i»**j©£fi •■xsaii ha* *alm 6»*t»vo3cu tol esaMwriA « 1 



% 



Appendix, Sheet *?-*" 



RECORD Off PHRSBHT HBATIW3 , PROCBSS AHD HOT WATER LOAD 



• 







LIMB A TO 


B 










BUILDXHO 


UBCOYBHHD 
RADIATIOH UAIHS 
ADS 

sq. FT. (I) 

2,066 28? 


TOTAL 
HBATXBS 
OHLT 


PRO 
ST 

Lit. 

172 


CESS 
EAM 

DIRICT 


HOT WATIB 
LOAD 

RAD. 


TOTAL Bq. 
DZR. BAD. 


MICRO-BIOLOO. 


2,662 


688 


250 


2,912 


COTTA&B "A* 


UOU 


50* 


525 


+- 





60 


585 


COTTABB «B« 


330 


30* 


429 


— 





60 


489 


HORT. BARS 


55 


5036 


72 


— 








72 


GROUSD SSHTICB 


258 


3C* 


335 


— 





— 


335 


OLD BURFKS RAHGE 


2,652 


20 


3,400 


— 








3,^00 


TO.PLAHT HQUSB 


902 


30* 


1,173 


— 








1,173 


prssibbb^s hqusj 


1,193 


29* 


1,548 


— 





347 


1,895 


WILDBB HALL 


1,078 


29* 


1,400 


— 


-:. 


60 


l,46o 


PRBBCB HALL 


6,402 


24* 


7,938 


— 





173 


3,111 


PHYSICS LAB. 


988 


30* 


ft ,284 


— 





140 


1,424 


CLARK HALL 


2,552 


28* 


3,274 


— 





173 


3,U47 


HATH. BLDG. 


*57 


30* 


1,114 


— 


— %i 


— 


1,114 


YSRHALS HALL 


5,971 


24* 


7,435 


— 


— 4 


121 


7 f 556 


FRAfHRHXTY HOUSE 


1,022 


29* 


*.32« 


ZmmmZm 


" 


- 3PP. 


^|62f 








33,917 


172 


688 


1,684 


35,601 






BOXLKR PLABT TO POHJT 


«c* 








HORTH C0LLB3B 


4,062 


26* 


5,143 


— 


■•' : ; V . 


3,550 


8,693 


SOUTH COLUBGI 


3,222 


27* 


4,110 


— 





1,560 


5,670 


LIBRARY 


1,676 


30* 


2,178 


— 





— 


2,17« 


ttBlOBIAL BLDG. 


3,755 


26* 


4,767 


*** 


— 


250 


5,017 


BRILL HALL 


1,729 


29* 


2,233 


— 





3,500 


5,733 


PHYS.BBUCATIOH 


19,802 


20* 


23,762 


— 





6,080 


29,842 


PAIOB TOT. LAB. 


2,017 


28* 


2,600 


— 





256 


2,856 


TBTIRIBAET BARB 


518 


30* 


*73 


_ 


— . 


— — 


671 



45,466 



15,196 



60,662 






(m 



- 









i 
113 






.- • 






T^ 









CtO t d 



« 



JHU 









. 



/ 






! 






i8d sir tie* 



I in 



I M 



Of 



In 
to* 



fc u ;k'*'i ^0 '■ ' 30U 












et 









MAI .ff&HI 



see mow **ure,m 

ami 



BBC 









,«U E 









— M . 

— ITf 

— f | 












I 



. ■•■:• T-.rc-ri MRP 

HKI Hi RHM 

Uauxj 



» 



• 



% 



Appendix, Sheet "F-b* 





KSCOf© OT PKS3BWT SBA'PIHO , PROCBSS AW) HOT WATER LOAD 



BOILKB FLAW TO jPGXHT *D» 



BEIIDIBB 

POTO PLAKT 

9A3BI HOUSI #1 

OAJUfiS 

OLD BOJtSI BARK 
TOTAL 



RADIATIOH 

1,333 

500 

170 
II 



UICQffcBfD 
HAINS 

. 00 



29* 

30* 

30* 

30* 



TOTAL 
HZATXSB 

(Mir 



1J28 
6^0 
221 



prociss 

■PJbJMeViM 



ROT WATER 
LOAD 



PlUOf HAD. 

too 

250 



12 



2,622 



room stock bam 591 

f ABM DAISY **7 
TOTAL 



poxbt «d» 
30* 
30* 



TO *1* 
777 

1,358 



ARENA 
ABBATOIB 

f asm mm ALOW 

TOTAL 



878 

185 
1*7 



POXHT "D* 
30* 

30* 
30* 



TO •»*• 

1,1*1 

2*6 

_12i 

i,57S 



PODLTBY H0038 H 

poultiy HOtrst #3 

POULTRY WOtJSI #* 

f ABM BH&. BLDO. 
HATCR BAHH 
9AT0W BABX AfflTBX 
Aft. O1SSKHO01I 
BEAD 80095 



Bom© plabt to pout "a" 

191 30* 2*8 

211 30* 273 

*S 30* 62 

1,881 29* 2,*27 

75 

U,2U0 



58 

312 
150 



30* 



30* 



650 



130 

260 



1QQ 

230 



Uoo 



50 



*50 



GBAHD TOTAL 



Lett Physical Education Building 



TOTAL Z%. 
DIB. BAD. 



2 f X20 
900 

221 

3,26* 



907 
HI 



1,618 



1,1*1 

3*6 

1,808 



6*8 

273 
62 

2,*77 

55* 

75 

5406 

*,690 
192,2*1 

l62,*00 

■<J. ft. 






~J8L 






t 









t T 






. 



mj 



u 






- 



. 



J* 



'■■;■ t ..;-~: 



UH ir?> r- ": '• :^00'- 



*8?»fe 20K 






1M 


JP . 




. 


.: "\r. 


aftM 




OOM 





"I- .101 Ot I«U1 '•••U-.V 






CWJ.-XsI? •" 









aS>a 













■ t A 


III 


t 


MH4 - 


1 1 






. : •: 


,' f, :v-*« ;.J 






*#£ 


,'X 


■ > 


.•'.;'. 




*<* 




t»A« liKM < 
















«o* =m 










*- 









. 



T<W 



■ 



m 



■ 



OH 














w. 


P>1 


»ve f x 












'.-■■' 




I 



Ml 






01 



at, 









. 









u 















• 



DIAGRAM 07 PROPOSED CONDUIT LOCATIONS 
(SEE LABGE DRAWING) 



Section B 




Farm Building! 





J-706 Appendix, Sheet •<*• 

XSTIMATES OF COKSfHUCTIOK COSTS 




UHEBROBOOT) STEAM IHSTALLATIOHS. 

1. These estimates are approximately correct, end include material e 
and labor for as installation oft 

Vitrified clay conduits. 

Standard weight steel supply mains. 

Corrugated expansion joints. 

Xxtra strong wrought iron return mains. 

Double standard thickness S5^ magnesia sectional covering on 

steam pipes, and standard thickness on the return mains. 

2. Branch underground connections from underground mains to all 
buildings now supplied from the central plant, with connec- 
tions within the buildings to the present building piping. 

3. In the 30 lb. pressure installation a 100 lb . pressure line 

Is also included from the boiler plant to Ooessmann Laboratory, 
engineers fees and trarsling expenses. 

70S 100 13. STEAM F8S3SURI 

on Sections A, B, C and D, with exhaust pressure (20 lb.) on 

Sections I and 7. See diagram print facing thle page. 
Estimated (?os^ 

Section A $39,965. 

Section 1 53,279. 

Section C 9,155. 

Section D 32,852. 

Section 1 9,537. 

Section f 12 r 310. 

TOTAL $157,09$. 



A 



O 



C 





J-706 Appendix, Sheet "O-m* 

IOB20U. SfSAU PKS5STJK1 

lots. Section C oadtted for thle pressure. 

1st lasted Qosj. 

Section A $77*320. 

Section 1 5*,977. 

Section D **1,137. 

Section B 9,537. 

Section ? 12 f tt0- 

TOTAL $199,2*1. $199,2*1. 

CHAJBJW in BOXLKB AID TORBIH HOUSE PDPTO 

Boiler Plant changes for 20 lb, lines, contisoe 

making current. $ 600. 

Hew piping change e at once . 

Ken 500 K.W. turbine-generator, 

foundation i and piping $25,000. 

Vltnin 3 to 5 y«*r*. $22U,gSl. 

*ad °* 10 years , a 2nd 500 K.W. unit $25,000. 
One 200 H.P. t.T. boiler and setting 10,000. 
Piping boiler and turbine 5 r 0CXK **Q f 000- 

Capital lnTeetasnt, 2nd 10 years $26H,S81. 




i ... f .'Smm 






... ,,. , . v . .. ., . ^ ,, v jgg 






« 



• 






- 






• - . 



■ 






*i _*? 



I 



" 



■ l .. •:. :i : :.. ■ " ■■■" " " ■"■ * *'v ■•§ 






. 



£sf$*»9 tea *si*o# ,T.W 

. *i _ •***!** tew ™ vrt 



• 



♦ 






J-706 Appendix, Sheet «H» 

CQMPARI30H Of COSTS Of OtSMUHtD AHD 
PURCHASED KWEH 

The Items of cost given in the vain body of the report were 
made up as follows t 

I tea e. Atom) ^Exhausted to the Atmosphere. Whom the amount of steam 
required by the turbine* exceeds the amount required for heat, the steam 
exhausted to the atmosphere is chargeable to power. In every month of 
the year the steam required for heat plus the underground losses exceeds 
the amount required for power, but there are certain hours of the day 
during July, August and September when the reverse is true. With a re- 
duction in the underground losses in a new system, the amount of steam 
exhausted to the atmosphere will be Increased , 

Both steam for heat and for power are at a minimum during 
August. The total steam used during August, 1931, averaged 6lj$0 lb. per 
hour. The kilowatt-hour* averaged 1000 per hour. The average kilowatt 

Lbs. of Steam 
Required by 

garble* 
75 i». i»* K.w.a. 13,500 
65 • • 19,500 

6o . • • 39,000 

75 • ■ 26,250 

80 • I g t ftp 

123,850 

The hourly average steam required by the turbines is then 

approxismtely IffLWQ „ 5,120 lb. plus 5* for excitation or 5376 lb. 
per hour which is 75U lb. loss than the total hourly requirement. 

From 12 a to 5 P.*. the average hourly turbine requirement is 
7800 lb. plus 5$ 4 £190 lb, , but the demand for process steam is also 



load varied somewhat as follows j 










6 A. si. to 9 A.H. 


60 X.W. 


180 K.W.H. 


9 • to 12 m. 


100 * 


300 • 


12 If to 5 ?.M. 


130 * 


650 • 


5 P.M. to 10 * 


70 ■'. 


350 • 


5 ■ to 6 A.M. 


Ho • 


1800 






iCF-i 



8XA KM'--- "' ».'..' ~ '• ''"'■■ 08 VB -''' ; - E ■■-■.'■'.■"'*' 



atsw ftotfor ad£ 1© ^jooo* nlfiae off* iii oorla *too to oao*l odff 

tt«oII«1 •« 30 aoo* 

to louts 9rf4 jrorft ,ff7ftfff«tf A **» 9* ^WNW Uttl •* Mil 

aooio at. rt ioiloporr Iami »rf# ooooaxo oocltfto* »ff* yrf be-si^pef 

If ooottM ftOffli • > oo \ ©# ^XtfooyuMfo ol ruajioofg ©rfi ©# ©oftoauCKO 

oftooev© aeaaol ac0O*8too«© ©rf# Otfiq **ftri tol Jboiiopoi eaofa orf* ia*% otft 

..... ,.| V^ -,^^ .rr ;-;-.: ; -r . ; OtOOtl v,.',! ,1M| Ml U«i«f«1 toWM Hi 

.omj *X ottomr ©rf# saisfcr rf»djso$q«g Icmi loop/A t \lii\> > 
ao*ta 1© £000*0 on** ,<so;f&x* <*•« « al sosooX oatHKarro&ftir ©rft ©i rrilia©© 

.00000*10*^ ©tf XXJhr ottrifoitojfo ojft o# 
& ftwaiaiai a *a $?« <s«««*f to 1 * Jfc?o '$ «wf tot BMtii 4*#t 






<^8xr»o* acXiitf £©«©- mill X/ 






UM( ioq 0081 ©•yrrovo *ivoJf-^#«*oJl* ©iff 

i a-.vo CM »* t*©5f©*ot ©*Xt«t ©*©X 



«, 









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■.*•■• v 

JBOOJu-aSjuI 



.M> & ©4 ,tl.A 3 



odo.er 

oiMi 









o& 


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•: £ 


I 





tfi,E 






mwC# cl *oaleta»t erf* \rf boil©?©* 
.dX to «ef^i©xs lot fe •*«©; \ 

i| it M*l0| 01 '^' ■•"••'> '.ri-rx/' "•' *" 



* 



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i a 




1 


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o#.M.t e 


» •■ . 




©* 


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Ttforf TOq 



oo£o ol aoo#© ft««ooio; lot ftaano© orff loo* , ,efX OPX' 



• #? boXo .*X OOoT 



<s 






J-7C6 Appendix, Sheet "H-e* 

above the twenty-four hour average at this time, hut how much above is not 
known. 

If it ie 20£ above, the turbine requirement will exceed it by 
approximately 1000 lb. per hour for 5 hours or 5000 lb. of exhaust a team 
to the atmosphere in 2k hours — 155f600 lb. for the month. Daring July 
and September the steam exhausted to atmosphere is somewhat less, but 
assuming it to be the same we have a total of U65,000 lb. for the year 
chargeable to turbines alone. 

This estimate is necessarily rough and we have asoumed as an 
outside figure 600,000 lb, which at 35 osnts per thousand lbs. for fuel 
amounts to $210., a negligible amount. 

Except for July, August and September, the steam required for 
heat plus underground losses exceeds the turbine requirement at all times. 

« 

The constant (present) underground loss Is estimated at 1H7 W.P. Tor new 
low pressure piping it is estimated at 69 H.P. , a reduction of 2700 lb. 
per hour In the constant requirement, or 3^30 lb. Instead of 6130 lb. per 
hour for August. Turbine requirement exceeds this for practically all 
of the twenty-four hours. Assuming the same load curve, the steam re- 
quired for the turbines in twenty-four hours, In excess of ether require- 
ments, would be approximately Uo,5&> lb. or 1,257,000 lb. for the month, 
and 3 1 772 ,000 over a period of three months. The month of June would 
add another 750,000, making approximately U, 500,000 lb. for the year, at 
35 cents per thousand for fuel, or $1,575. Ihi* amount would be reduced 
about one-half with the installation of a new turbine, but the installation 
would not be Justified on that account. There le no basis on which to 
estimate the steam to atmosphere under future conditions and the figures 
are assumed. 

Item 2. Heat Taken for Power. A turbine of 100 percent efficiency 
would take 3,^15 B.t.u. for each kilowatt. In a commercial turbine unit 



«*-»» #*«•$ ixttmmnfik 



.... 

«§•*• *««***• tc '? to fttxrorf <: •so"' "fiwrf i«q ,.fl 000 X ^XsJftGlxo-Tqxi* 

•H # if*ffoa «d* net — 8*wed 4*S Hi snrecfcisoWa wtt e* 

tfirf ,»••£ J aiftr— o b •! vTMfgaeczfcB o* Jto48iMufx» ma©#* *ff* ? 
*?iT *i 0,c-^' **o* a era* «nr e*fl* ttf* *4 9$ $t ibXooma 

as ft* Jtaftftftaa avarf sw £fra d^aoi xX~"*e»ft3«r el *#*■&■ » «*«*T 
Xaurt to'* .atfl ftgiMyw w C t leq tttaftf- *» jfeixfir .tfX 0C> rtv^it oMsJyo 

£as^8 •*& , Te-dtoe^qe-S &ft* dsisguA , , ftftxZ 

„'»•"■■■.■ ; ; ■••. ?--;■; :;:>.;• '■ ■'. I . t ■ ~) ferfj ftJ»fftB)M K UFftj iMPtt^MACI 8-D J . ftlMl 

«Mr tof »*?. [ i* he#aBi£«« «X 8«eX oajro-ngiftboi? (Jflesetq) Joalftooo ft*9 

.dX COTS '': ,. . P3 $« JtarfMiltaft *i fri |ftj ■■nsmnvur woX 

t*<t ,dX 0? | hamtnat .tfl 

II aitss'ic ilrf* 8JD««MkX» #jx909*tix;nQT «r, .Jvu&fk tot iuad 

-#* ffi0*-#8 *fit t dv'f:.o &jboX ftftiftft arf* affiaviftA nv# *rfi *o 

: 9aom wit to* , ,i to .ft*! 0M| > J^gBiTO'Hf &d %Jmm t *cta<M 

"^ '": .yK-^flftffl ftHTfCt *0 l>ftllftCf * T#TC 

J« t t(M»x 9/f* *rol ,rfi 000,00<?,tf xlftijMBjxoriqgA iprlsCfltt ,f era bbn 

Ln*."':..-\ wi %Smm feNMM Mil • i>cr*»tttK# tftcr. fttafto ?£ 

' .TO »/?.i9rf Off 9t ftlSffT .fiWOOGB iJ ttfl^ 3d 



%v 



J-706 Appendix, sheet "H-b" 

there are non-recoverable heat losses in turbine and generator, of a little 
over 10#. 3800 B.t.u. per X.S.H. Is therefore usually assumed ae the ap- 
proximate amount of heat taken. A pound of soal of lH,50G tt.t.u, with 
a furnace and boiler efficiency of 10$, will deliver 10,150 B.t.u. to the 
•team, or .37H lb. of coal per X.W.H, The coal cost ie .0031 l*r pound, 
or .00116 per X.W.H, 
Item 3. Labor Coet r due to the generation of power, consist a of 

Three match engineers $5,U00. 

One-half time of relief engineer 900* 

One-muarter time of assistant 

chief engineer 510- $6,810. 

Item k. Ixtra fixed Charges. for the extra coot of lorn pressure 

piping over high pressure piping at 10#, $3800.30. 

Item. 5. She Underground Losses te>r high pressure distribution are 

estimated at 60 boiler H.P. continuously, and for low pressure 69 H.P. 

The increased loss amounts, therefore, to approximately 2,730,000 lb. 

per annum, or $962. per annum. 

Item 6. Maintenance. Supplies. Repairs. These are taken at an 

arbitrary figure of $0.0011 per K.W.H. , and will amount to $1,375 P** 

year. 

Item 7. Hew gsalnmont. A new 3 stage steam end for turbine lo. 2, 

one of the 300 &•*• generating units — will cost approximately $8,000, 

or a fixed charge of $1,200. per year. 

With any substantial increase in lead, a new 500 K.W. unit 
will be necessary, which, installed with proper foundations and pipe 
changes, would cost approximately $25,000. This would improve the water 
rate by a substantial percentage and would avoid the $8,000 investment. 

Before the third load condition (2,000,000 K.W.ff.) ie reached, 
a second 500 X.W. turbine would be required and a new 200 H.P. boiler, 



,m* Rl *©*9©X $»'J:> *td0ll«>rr <olt ytM §Ttfi v 

-q» ©<f* •* Jbttvftta xIX*©iMr ©iol»T«W »i .H.fc.X i«q .tf.*.S 008£ .3tCX *!©▼© 

©os ^o hravo^ A , ,' ■, S .;'< : *r FaffM ftj.--,* ;:*©-ref 
•if* ©* »*'* . , 

,&fjl/mj . ,1 lacf f^e>0 1© , 

... 

©sir.?©©^ woX t© £a©$ 8t#x» ©4* t .^©y 

aii**«©7' 
td tot »»gga» 

.tUs© 

. - 



, 



M M Mflfiftf ©t* MNkfl 



© 

; H ■••■'* ' * <-..•*';.■:■* *inalf .? ?r r .' ,a©afluMf© 

,l>Orf©4MW: &1 (, I) K©ltlJfe©©© £*o£ frx. ©« 

,**©X A ^Xttww ©jsrififS # X OOfc ©ooo©t * 



o 




J~706 Appendix, Sheet "H-sl 1 

making fixed charges of 15 percent on the following, 

#1-900 *♦». Turbine $25,000 

#2 - ■ * « 25,000 

200 *.?. Boiler 10,000 

Pipe changes 5 T 000 



$65,000, 



15* m $9,000, 



Item S. qpat of Purchased Power, i f figured at the price* submitted by 
the Public Service Company, I.e. $1.50 per I.W. of demand, monthly service 
charge plus $0,013 (one and three-tenth i cent a per K.I.H. ) The annual 
peak load for the three conditlone le taken ae U00 K.W. , U75 K.W. and 
650 K.W. reepectiveiy, and the average monthly demand ae 300 K.W. , 360 
K.W. and H60 K.W. for the three conditlone reepectiveiy. 






#••48 ( 



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. 



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to ktfijmkm t»ft£*i oft M 



I lo *e*TSrfO Jb'. 



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TRUSTEE 



* 



THE MASSACHUSETTS AGRICULTURAL COLLEGE 

The tentative date for the annual meeting of 
the Board was announced as Thursday, January 19, 1933. 
This seemed to meet with the approval of the Trustees. 

The meeting adjourned at g:30 P.M. 



Vice 
aJ* Pr e s id en t 



645 




Secretary 



> 



Annual 

Meeting 

Date 



646 



TRUSTEE 



Call 



iinutes 



Committee to 
Wait on 
Governor 



Nominating 
Committee 



THE MASSACHUSETTS AGRICULTURAL COLLEGE 

MINUTES OF ANNUAL MEETING OF BOARD OF TRUSTEES 

Room 450, State House, Boston, January 19, 1953, 9:40 A.M 

Vice-President Ellis, Chairman* 

PRESENT: All Trustees were present as were also Dr. 
Baker and Treasurer Kenney. 

The following is the call for the meeting: 

Amherst, Mass. 
January 5, 1933 

To the Trustees of 
Massachusetts State College 

Gentlemen: 

In accordance with the provisions of the By-Laws, 
the annual meeting of the Board of Trustees of Massachu- 
setts State College is hereby called to convene in 
Room 136, State House, Boston, Massachusetts on Thursday, 
January 19, 1933 at 9:30 A.M. 

This meeting will be preceded by Committee meetings 
on Wednesday, January 18th in accordance with the 
schedule attached. 

Very truly yours, 

/s/ Robert D. Hawley 
Secretary 

The minutes of the preceding meeting were read 
and approved. 

The Chairman, appointed Trustees Malcolm and 
Preston as a special committee to wait upon the Governor 
and notify him that the Board of Trustees was in session 
for its annual meeting. 

It was 

VOTED: That the Chairman appoint a nominating com- 
mittee: Trustees Frost, Chandler, and 
Whitmore were appointed. 



K 



TRUSTEE 



THE MASSACHUSETTS AGRICULTURAL COLLEGE 



647 



The Treasurer presented his annual report and Treasurer's 

Report 



it was 



VOTED : To adopt the report of the Treasurer and 
authorize its publication. 

The Secretary presented a summary of the annual 

report of the administration which had previously been 

submitted to each Trustee in detail by mail. This 

summary was presented in the form of ten charts. It was 

VOTED ; To adopt the annual report of the administra 
tion and authorize its publication. 

It was 

VOTED; That the ten charts exhibited by the Secre- 
tary be included in the published annual 
report of the administration. 

It was 

VOTED: To record the appreciation of the Trustees 

for the work of the Administrative Committee 
of the Faculty in their administration of 
the affairs of the College during the past 
five months. 

In the absence of the Secretary from the room, 



Report of 
Administration 



it was proposed and 

VOTED: That the Treasurer be and hereby is 

authorized to pay to Robert D, Hawley 
from the income of Trust Funds of the 
College as compensation for special and 
additional services rendered as Chairman 
the Administrative Committee during the 
past five months. 



$500 



Appreciation 

Administrtive 

Comiittee 



of 



The matter of tuition, deferred from the last 

meeting of the Board, was again taken under consideration 

It was 

VOTED : That the motion regarding tuition proposed 
and amended at the last meeting be taken 
from the table , 



Additional 

Salary, 

R. D, Hawley 



Tuition 



648 



TRUSTEE 



$10,000 Aid 
Fund 



Professor 
Foard *s Case 
Reopened 



Enrollment 
Limitation 



THE MASSACHUSETTS AGRICULTURAL COLLEGE 



Substitute motion that the Chairman appoint a 

special committee of seven to study the matter of tuition 

was lost. Following extended discussion upon substitute 

motions duly made and seconded, it was 

VOTED ; That tuition for all students, residents of 
Massachusetts, be increased to $100 per year 
and the tuition for students who are not 
residents of Massachusetts be increased to 
$220 per year and that these tuition charges 
include present student fees: laboratory fee, 
$12; health fee, $4,50; matriculation fee, 
$5, which are now separately charged. 

It was . 

VOTED: That the tuition rate thus established apply 
to all students beginning next September 
whether they are matriculating for the first 
time or not. 

It was 

VOTED : That the Trustees petition the present 

Legislature for an appropriation of $10,000 
to be used to aid worthy and needy students 
at the College who otherwise might be pre- 
vented from attending by increased tuition 
charges. 

Upon motion by Dr. Gilbert and seconded by Mr. 

Gerrett, it was 

VQT5D : That the matter of Professor Foord T s relation 
ship to the College be reopened and that a 
committee of three Trustees be appointed to 
investigate the matter and make a report to 
the Board of Trustees at its June meeting. 

Upon the recommendation of the Committee on 

Faculty and Program of Study, it was 



*, 



VOTED: 



That in view of the unusually large number oj 
applications for entrance in the four-year 
course and the impossibility under existing 
appropriations of accepting all qualified 
applicants, the enrollment of students in 
next year f s freshman class be limited to 
approximately 300 of whom, on account of lack 
of suitable housing facilities, not more than 
75 may be women; unless an increase in the 



teaching staff is provided justifyin 
crease m the number of accepte^^mp. 



It 



an m- 
.ications. 



TRUSTEE 



> 



> 



649 



THE MASSACHUSETTS AGRICULTURAL COLLEGE 

Upon the further recommendation of the Com- 
mittee on Faculty and Program of Study, it was 

VOTED ; That, in recognition of the present inter- 
state reciprocity regarding admission of 
out-of-state students in State Colleges and 
Universities and also in recognition of the 
financial support provided by the Federal 
Government, authority be granted for the 
admission of out-of-state students to the 
College in numbers not to exceed b% of all 
students admitted in any one class. 

At this point, His Excellency, Governor Joseph 
B. Ely attended the meeting of the Board. 

Mr, Griggs, member of the Legislative Committee 
reported the status of the dormitory bill. There was a 
discussion of the need for additional housing facilities 
at the College and the Governor expressed his interest 
in and sympathy with the efforts of the Trustees to in- 
crease these facilities. He also expressed his interest 
in the work of the State College in general and his 
willingness to assist the Board of Trustees whenever 
possible in promoting the best interests in this educa- 
tional enterprise of the Commonwealth. 

His Excellency retired from the meeting. 

* 

Upon the recommendation of the Committee on 

Buildings and Grounds, it was 

VOTED: • That Mr. Farley be authorized to proceed 

with the construction of the 4-H Club build- 
ing, as proposed, on the site south of the 
Power Plant and east of the farm house, pro- 
vided all plans for building and construction 
are approved by the Treasurer of the College 
in advance and vfith the understanding that 
the building when completed will be under 
the supervision of the Treasurer as are 
other buildings on the campus. 



Admission of 
Out-of-State 
Students 



Governor 

Attends 



, Dormitory 
Bill 



4-H Club 
Building 



j 



650 



TRUSTEE 



Committee 
Actions 



Election of 
Officers 



THE MASSACHUSETTS AGRICULTURAL COLLEGE 

It was 

VOTED : That all actions taken by committees of the 
Trustees during the year which have not 
been subsequently approved by the Board of 
Trustees be hereby approved. 

The nominating committee reported its recommen- 
dations for officers and committees of the Board of 
Trustees for the ensuing year and the Secretary was 
instructed to cast one ballot by which it was unanimously 

VOTED: To elect the following officers and committees 
of the Board of Trustees for the ensuing 
year: 

President, His Excellency, Governor Joseph B. Ely 
Vice-President, George H. Ellis 
Secretary, Robert D. Hawley 
Treasurer, Fred C. Kenney 
Auditor, Frank Gerrett 



COMMITTEE ON FINMCE 

Frank Gerrett, Chairman 
Nathaniel I. Bowditch 
George EL Ellis 

Charles H. 



John Chandler 
Harold L.Frost 
Davis R. Dewey 
Preston 



COMMITTEE ON FACULTY AND PROGRAM OF STUDY 



John Chandler 
John F. Gannon 
Arthur W. Gilbert 



Davis R. De^iey , Chairman 
James F. Bacon 
Payson Smith 

Mrs. Leach 

COMMITTEE ON AGRICULTURE 



Nathaniel I. Bowditch, Chairman Frank Gerrett 
David J. Malcolm Arthur W. Gilbert 

George H. Ellis 



COMMITT EE ON HORTI CULTURE 

Harold L. Frost, Chairman 
Howard S. Russell 
Charles H. Preston 

Mrs. Leach 



John Chandler 
Philip F. Whitmore 
Frederick D. Griggs 



(% 



?- 



THE MASSACHUSETTS AGRICULTURAL COLLEGE 



COMMIT TEE ON EXPERIMENT STATION 

Charles H. Preston, Chairman 
Arthur W. Gilbert 
Howard S. Russell 

COMMITT EE ON BUILDINGS MD GROUNDS 

George H. Ellis, Chairman 
Frank Gerrett 
David J. Malcolm 

Committee on extension service 

John Chandler, Chairman 
N a than i el I . Bowdi t c h 
Frederick D. Griggs 

Mrs. Leach 

COMMITTEE ON LEGISLATION 



Harold L. Frost 
Philip F. Whitmore 
David J. Malcolm 



James F. Bacon 
Charles H # Preston 
Philip F. Whitmore 



Davis R. Dewey 
John F. Gannon 
Arthur t. Gilbert 



George H. Ellis James F. Bacon 

Frederick D. Griggs 

In view of the ability of Dr. Baker to take up 

his duties as President of the College at an earlier date 

than had been considered possible at the time of his 

election, it was 

P3TE D: That the record of the election of Dr. 

Hugh P. Baker as President of the College 
recorded in the report of the meeting of 
the Board of Trustees of October 6th be 
changed so as to make this appointment 
effective January 18, 1935, 

President Baker expressed his appreciation of 

the confidence placed in him by the Trustees as witnessed 

by their choice of him for the Presidency of the College 

and pledged his best efforts to the responsibilities of 

his new office. 



The meeting adjourned at 1:15 P.^. 




Vice 
.President 



Secretary 



651 



Date of 

taking < 

for Dr. Baker 



taking office I 






Adjournment 



■ 



MMH 



J 



652 



TRUSTEE 



Call 



Treasurer 1 s 
Report 



Professor 
Chenoweth 1 s 

Leave 



THE MASSACHUSETTS AGRICULTURAL COLLEGE 

MINUTE S OF SPECIAL "."TING OF BOAR D OF TRUS TEES 
Boston City Club, Boston, May 4, 1933 IS M. 
Vice-President Ellis, Chairman, 



rriil»bllii\l x : 



Trustees Bacon, Bowditch, Chandler, Dewey, 
Ellis, Frost, Gannon, Gerrett, Griggs, 
Leach, Malcolm, Preston, Russell, Smith, 
hitmore; President Baker, Treasurer Kenney 

The following is the call for the meeting: 

;herst, Mass, 
April, SI, 1933. 

To the Trustees of 
Massachusetts State College 

Gentlemen: . 

Upon the request of President Baker, the Vice-Presi- 
dent of the Board has authorized me to call a special 
meeting of the Board of Trustees of the Massachusetts 
State College to convene at the Boston City Club on 
Thursday, May 4, 1933, at twelve o'clock, noon. This 
will be a luncheon meeting, the purpose of which will be 
to consider important financial arrangements, resignations 

I pointments and such other matters as properly may be 
presented. 

Yours respectfully, 

/s/ Robert D. tlawley 
Secretary 

The minutes of the preceding meeting were 
approved without reading. 

The Treasurer presented a financial report indi- 
cating that of the probable state appropriation of approxi 
mat el y 330,000 this year, about Z2% has been spent during 
the first four months of the year. 

Upon the recommendation of the President, it was 

VOTED ; To grant a leave of absence with pay to 

Professor Chenoweth for the period of the 
first semester 1933-34 in order to enable 
him to regain his health. 






Il> 



TRUSTEE 



> 



9 



THE MASSACHUSETTS AGRICULTURAL COLLEGE 



The following resignations were reported to be 
effective August 51, 1933: 

Assistant Professor Miles H. Cubbon, Department of Agronmy 

Mr. Ellsworth Barnard, Instructor in English 
Frederick S. Troy, Instructor in English 

It was 

VOTED : To approve the action of the president in 
accepting the resignations listed above. 

The appointment of Mr. Jay L. Haddock to be 

full time Instructor in Agronomy, effective September 1, 

1933 at the salary of $1,440 was reported and it was 

VOTED : To approve the action of the President in 
appointing . Mr. Haddock, Instructor in 
Agronomy. 

Upon the recommendation of the President, it 



was 



VOTED : To elect Professor Robert P. Holdsworth to 
be Head of the Department of Forestry 
effective June 1, 1933 without change of 
salary. 

Upon the recommendation of the President, it 



was 



VOTED : To elect Assistant Professor Arthur K. 

Harrison to be Professor of Landscape Archi- 
tecture, without change of salary, to be 
effective March 1, 1933. 

Recommendation was received from the Trustee 

Committee on Buildings and Grounds that the Grounds 

Service horses be transferred to the farm horse barn and 

that the present barn used by the Grounds Service for 

housing its horses and other purposes be closed. It was 

VOTED: To approve the recommendation. 



653 



Resignations 



Appointment 



Promotions 



Grounds 
Service Barn 



654 



TRUSTEE 



Milk noute 



Dining Hall 
Board Rate, 
Student Labor 
Rate 



Tuition Rate 
for Special 
Student s 



Sorority 
Houses 



THE MASSACHUSETTS AGRICULTURAL COLLEGE 

Recommendation was received from the Trustee 
Committee on Agriculture that the purchase of milk by 
the Department of Dairy Industry from the outside be dis- 
continued and that the distribution of milk by route be 
discontinued, both to be effective September 1st, next. 
It was 

VOTED : To approve the recommendation of the Com- 
mittee on Agriculture. 

The President explained the administrative 

action taken effective April 1st of decreasing cost of 

board to students and the rate of pay for student labor. 

It was 

VOTED: To confirm the action of the President re- 
ducing board at the Dining Hall from $6.00 
to $5.50 per week and reducing the basic 
rate of student pay from thirty to twenty- 
five cents per hour. 

The need to establish new part-time tuition 

rates, in view of the increased tuition to become 

effective September 1st, next, was explained and upon 

the recommendation of the President, it w 

VOTED: That all students in regular courses (under* 
graduate, graduate and Stockbridge) whose 
schedules amount to less than 14 credits 
per semester shall be considered as special 
students and charged tuition at the follow- 
ing rates: 

Residents of Massachusetts, $3,50 o::r credit 
Out of State Residents, S8.00 per credit 
These rates will be effective beginning 
September 1, 1933. 

In view of the fact that less than half of the 

girl students at the College are accommodated in Adams 

Hall, meaning therefore that a half or more must live in 

private hoijes about the Coll or commute from their 




• 




> 



TRUSTEE 






> 



THE MASSACHUSETTS AGRICULTURAL COLLEGE 

homes; and in view of the fact that it has been the policy 

of Miss Skinner and others having to do with the housing 

of women to rather favor the housing of non-sorority girls 

in Adams Hall; and finally in view of the fact that the 

sororities have petitioned the President for permission to 

occupy houses off campus beginning with the coming year, 

it was recommended by the President that a policy be 

established to allow sororities, under proper control and 

regulation, to occupy off-campus houses. Following 

discussion, it was 

VOTE Dc; To adopt the policy of allowing sororities, 
under proper control and regulations, to 
occupy off -campus houses. 

The President reported concerning the activity 

of the special Alumni Committee appointed to investigate 

means of providing dormitories at the College. Three 

different methods are having tentative consideration by 

the Alumni. On*s is a special bond issue by the State, 

interest and amortization, to be paid for out of income 

from the dormitory; another is the formation of an 

Alumni Holding Corporation to issue bonds or preferred 

stock for the construction of the dormitory which would be 

leased to the College and the cost paid for and amortized 

by income. The third method under consideration is that o 

a loan from the Reconstruction Finance Corporation. Since 

some legal authority for procedure may be necessary and 

since it may be advisable to try to secure this from the 

present Legislature, which would mean quick action, at 



655 



Dormitory 



656 



TRUSTEE 



Lease of 
Land 



Executive 
Committee 
Elected 



Steam Lines 



THE MASSACHUSETTS AGRICULTURAL COLLEGE 

their request it was 

VOTED ; To authorize the Executive Committee of the 
Board of Trustees to act for the Board to 
lease land on the College Campus to an 
Alumni Holding Corporation, provided this 
method of procedure for the construction of 
a dormitory seems wise and the necessary 
legislative authority is secured. 

The President also presented to the Trustees a 
question which the -^lumni have asked as to whether or 
not the Trustees would be willing to furnis heat and 
light for a dormitory constructed by an Alumni Holding 
Corporation and leased to the College. It was pointed 
out that the onl^r interest of the Alumni is to provide 
a needed building at the College and that as soon as the 
cost of construction could be amortized the ownership of 
the building would revert to the College. Action on this 
question was postponed until such a time as a definite 
proposal might be submitted. 

Question was raised as to the status of the 

Trustee Executive Committee and upon motion duly made and 

seconded it was 

VOTED ; That Trustees Ellis, Bacon, and Whitmore 
be elected as the Executive Committee of 
the Board of Trustees. 

Upon the recommendation of the Committee on 

Buildings and Grounds it was 

VOTED ; To authorize the Treasurer to employ, with 
the approval of the State Engineer, an 
engineer to prepare specifications for the 
feplacement of steam lines in accordance 
with plans contemplated in the appropriation 
with the understanding that said engineer 
will supervise the installation of such 
lines and further, that the cost for this 
engineering service will not exceed 5% of 
the appropriation-. 



• 



THE MASSACHUSETTS AGRICULTURAL COLLEGE 

The ^resident pointed out the possibility that 
through the passage of the so-called Wagner Bill by the 
Federal Congress, funds may become available in Massa- 
chusetts for unemployment relief. The College, as a 
state activity, should put itself into a position to 
assist the State in using these funds in a 'helpful and 
constructive way. With this in mind, the President has 
asked for projects which might be in line with the 
general plans^ for using these funds and preliminary 
reports indicate that approximately $42,000 might be 
used advantageously at the College, Following discussion 
it was 

VOTED ; To authorize the President to prepare a 
list of projects indicating cost, to be 
submitted to proper authorities, if and 
when, these Feder 1 welfare funds become 
available in Massachusetts. 

The President described the situation regard- 

t 

ing the appropriation of Federal Funds for the next 
Federal fiscal year beginning July 1. While apparently 
no definite decision has been reached, it is considered 
probable that a drastic cut will be made, possibly 
twenty-five per cent and perhaps even more, particularly 
in Experiment Station funds. This will make a very 
serious situation at the College, particularly in vidw 
of the fact that a large proportion of these funds is 
used for personal service, 

Mr. Bowditch announced that by a mail poll it 
had been unanimously 

VOTED: To award to Mr. Geoege H. Ellis the 

honorary degree, Doctor of Laws, at the 
forthcoming Commencement. 



657 



Federal Funds 
Projects 



Mr. Ellis, 
Honosary Degree 



658 



TRUSTEE 



Honorary 
Degfees 



Authority of 

Executive 
Corn .ittee 



THE MASSACHUSETTS AGRICULTURAL COLLEGE 

Mr. Ellis expressed his surprise and sincere 
appreciation. The award of this degree was originally 
suggested by the Associate Alumni and heartily endorsed 
by the President and his Cabinet, in being transmitted 
to the Trustees. 

Dr. Joseph B. Lindsey and Dr. Homer X. Wheeler, 

both prominent Alumni of the Class of 1883, were nominate)! 

by the President for consideration as candidates for 

honorary degrees. Upon motion made and seconded, it was 

VOTED ; To confer the honorary degree of Doctor of 
. Science upon Joseph B. Lindsey and Homer J. 
Wheeler. ' 

Report was received from Dr. Gilbert who was 

absent on a visit to Washington that he is hopeful of 

being able to arrange for the use of Federal R. F. C. 

funds for the construction of a dormitory at the College. 

He asked that a special committee be authorized to 

negotiate with proper authorities concerning the matter, 

and it was therefore 

VOTED: That authority be granted to the Executive 
Committee and the Legislative Committee of 
the Board of Trustees to negotiate with 
proper officials regarding the loan of 
Federal funds for the construction of 
dormitories. 

The meeting adjourned at 3:15. P.M. 



Vice 
President 




Secretary 



♦ 



♦ 



(• 



. 



659 



> 



TRUSTEE 



THE MASSACHUSETTS AGRICULTURAL COLLEGE 

SUGGESTIVE ORDER OF BUSINESS 
FOR MEETING OF THE BOARD OF TRUSTEES 
MASSACHUSETTS STATE COLLEGE 
PRESIDENT'S OFFICE AT THE COLLEGE 
June 12, 1933, 9:00 A.M. 



> 



I. Call to order by the Governor as President or by 
Mr. Ellis as Vice-President of the Board. 

II. Minutes of previous meeting. 

III. Reports of Committees. 

a. Trustee Committee on Buildings and Grounds. 

IV. Brief financial report. 

a. Budget for 1934 in preparation - Budget meet- 
ing in September • 

V. Changes in courses. 

VI. Changes in personnel. 

a. Appointment of temporary members of the staff 
to a permanent basis. 

VII. Recommendation of candidates for degrees to be 
conferred at Sixty-Third Annual Commencement. 

VIII. Report on new scholarships. 

a. The Garden Club Federation of Massachusetts. 

b. Hood Dairy Scholarships. 

IX. Report on bequests. 

a . Wheeler 

b. Pinker ton 

X. Student housing. 

a. Alumni Committee on Dormitories and Dormitory 

bill in Legislature. 

b. Recommendations as to dormitories from 

Advisory Council of Women. 

XI. Unfinished and new business and adjournment. 

a. Plans for inauguration of New President on . 
October 6, 1933. 



> 



660 



TRUSTEE 



Call 



Minutes 



Buildings 
and Grounds 
Centraliza- 
tion 



THE MASSACHUSETTS AGRICULTURAL COLLEGE 

MINUTES "OF S EMI -ANNUAL MEETING OF BOARD OF TRUSTEES 
President's Office, Amherst, June 12, 1933, 9:00 A. M. 

Mr, Ellis, Vice-President of the Board, 
presided. 



PRESENT: 



Trustees Ellis, Griggs, Russell, Malcolm, 
Gilbert, Whitmore, Dewey, Frost, Preston, 
Gannon, Leach, Bowditch, Chandler, Gerrett 
Smith; President Baker. 



The following is the call for the meeting: 



Amherst, Mass. 
June 1, 1933. 

To the Board of Trustees 
Massachusetts State College 

Gentlemen: 

In accordance with the provisions of the By-Laws, 
the semi-annual meeting of the Board of Trustees is here- 
by called to convene at the President's Office at 
Amherst at 9:00 A.M., Monday, June 12, 1933. The purpose 
of this meeting will be to consider the granting of 
degrees and such other matters as properly may be pre-, 
sented at this time. 

Yours respectfully, 



/s/ Robert D. Hawley 
Secretary 



It was 



VOTED: To dispense with the reading of the minutes 
of the preceding meeting. 

A report was presented by the President 
recommending a centralization of the maintenance ser- 
vices for campus and buildings. This report had been 
presented to the Trustee Committee on Buildings and 
Grounds and by mail poll they had approved the 
President's recommendation. It was unanimously 

VOTEDf <po adopt the recommendation for centraliza- 
tion of maintenance services for campus and 
buildings. 



r 






} 



TRUSTEE 



1 



> 



661 



THE MASSACHUSETTS AGRICULTURAL COLLEGE 

The Chairman called for the report of the 
special committee appointed at the annual meeting to 
investigate the status of Professor Foord and declared 
the Trustees to he in executive session. President Baker 
and Secretary Hawley withdrew. The following report was 
submitted: 



Professor 
Foord 1 s 
Retirement 



June 12, 1933 



To the Board of Trustees 
Massachusetts State College 



The sub-committee appointed in January to consider 

the question of Professor Foord' s relationship with the 

Massachusetts State College desires to present the 
following report. 

We have made every attempt to make an impartial study 
of this perplexing problem and have given it the fullest 
amount of time. To the best of our knowledge we have 
neglected no data or source of information which might 
throw light on the question. 

We recommend that the vote concerning the retirement 
of Professor Foord, taken by the Board of Trustees on 
July 7, 1932, acting upon the recommendations of the com- 
mittee on faculty and program of study, shall stand as 
voted. 



was 



Following discussion by a majority of 10 to 4 it 
VOTED : To accept the report. 

Following discussion by a majority of 10 to 3 
it was 

VOTED : To adopt the report. 

This completed the business for the executive 
session and the President and Secretary returned to the 
meeting. Treasurer Kenney also attended. 

President Baker reported the serious illness 
of former President Butter fie Id. Upon motion duly made 



662 



TRUSTEE 



Dr. 

Butterfield* s 
Illness 



Budget 
Meeting 



Home 

Economics 
Graduate 
Course 



THE MASSACHUSETTS AGRICULTURAL COLLEGE 



and seconded and indicated by a rising vote, it was 
unanimously 

RESOLVE D: That the Board of Trustees of the 
Massachusetts State College deeply 
regret the illness of Dr. K. L. 
Butterfield and express to him their 
sincere sympathy and wish for his early 
recovery. 

President Baker reported the plans for 

preparation of the budget for the next year and upon 

his recommendation it was 

VOTED ; That a special meeting of the Board of 

Trustees be held in Boston on September 28, 
1933 for the purpose of considering the 
budget for the next year and such other 
matters as properly may be presented and 
that this meeting be preceded by such com- 
mittee meetings as may be necessary to be 
called early in September at the discretion 
of the President of the College. 

The President presented a proposal from the 

Graduate faculty, with his favorable recommendation, 

that, beginning September, 1953, graduate work in Home 

Economics be offered at the College. Following 

discussion it was 

VOTE D; To refer the matter to the Committee on 

Faculty and program of Study for report at 
the next meeting of the Board. 

Mr. Chandler raised the question as to the 

possibility of acting upon the proposal for graduate 

courses in Home Economics earlier than the meeting of 

the Board scheduled for September 28, in order that 

such courses might be included in the curriculum for 

the next scholastic year. Upon his motion, duly 



♦ 



# 



THE MASSACHUSETTS AGRICULTURAL COLLEGE 



seconded, it was 

VO TED : To authorize the President, at the request 
of the Committee on Faculty and Program of 
Study, to call a special meeting of the 
Board for consideration of this matter. 

The following professors, having completed 

their temporary appointment of three years in accordance 

with the terms of employment for the professional staff, 

were recommended by the President for reappointment on 

indefinite tenure: 

0. C. Boyd, Extension Specialist in Plant Pathology to be 

effective January 15, 1933. 
C. S. Gibbs, Research Professor in Veterinary Science to 

be effective November 4, 1932. 
E. J. Radcliffe, Professor of Hygiene and Student Health 

Officer to be effective September 1, 1933. 

It was 

VOTED : To approve the recommendation to reappoint 
these three men with the understanding that 
such appointment be distinctly understood as 
being for indefinite tenure. 

122 candidates as listed below were presented 

by the President upon the recommendation of the Faculty 

for the award of the degree Bachelor of Science. It was 

VOTED: To confer the degree Bachelor of Science 
upon the 122 members of the Class of 1933 
as listed. 

SUMMA CUM LAUDE 

Arthur Everett Bearse 

MAGxNA CUM LAUDE 
Howard Whitten Chenoweth 



663 



Reappointments 



B. S. Degrees 



664 



TRUSTEE 



THE MASSACHUSETTS AGRICULTURAL COLLEGE 

CUM LAUDE 

Dean As quit h 
John Butler Barr 
Bertram Cheney Goodell 
Alan Edwin Hovey 
Benjamin Isgur 
Arthur Clugh Parker 
Joseph Politella 
Lawrence Southwick 
George Fote Steffanides 
John Clyde Swartzwelder 
Fred Herbert Taylor 



RITE 



Clifton Nils Ahlstrom 
George Elliot Aldrich 
Mabelle Lydia Anderson 
Irene Elizabeth Armstrong 
Gertrude Agnes Barnes 
John Chaffer Barter 
Wilfred Hugh Bedord 
Nelson Frederick Beeler- 
Evelyn Elizabeth Beeman 
Burton Brainard Bell 
Doris Beula Benjamin 
Dorothy Gertrude Best 
Benjamin Davenport Betts 
Ralph Henry Bickford 
Margaret Mary Boston 
Arthur Sndicott Brown 
James Cornelius Bulman 
George Herbert Cain 
Marjorie Elizabeth Cary 
Carl Francis Clancy 
Charles Edward Clark 
Laura Grace Cooley 
Forrest Emerson Crawford 
David Crosby 
John Brewer Crowell 
Benton Pierce Cummings 
Joseph Maxwell Dechter 
Eunice Minerva Doerpholz 
George Wellington Dyar 
Richard Albert Eldridge 
Charles Clifford Entwistle 
Edward Gilbert Fawcett 
John Malcolm Fowler 
Edward Louis Gallup 
Agnes Elinor Garity 
Margaret Lawrence Gerrard 
Samuel Rand Gilmore 



Irene Rivak Leah Ginsburgh 
Cloyes Tilden Gleason 
Katherine Patricia Griffin 
Eugene Abraham Guralnick 
Ashley Buell Gurney 
William Perry Hager 
Richard Clayton Hammond 
John Robert Hanson 
Murray Ballou Hicks 
George Edward Hodsdon, Jr. 
Robert Stanley Hosford 
Gordon Andrew Hour an 
Robert Milton Howes 
Catherine Newton Hubbard 
Emil Izzi 

Carl George Jahnle 
Eunice Moore Johnson 
Elfriede Klaucke 
John Alexander Kovaleski 
Walter Michael Kulash 
Daniel Joseph Leary 
Philip Joseph Levereault 
Walter Arnold Maclinn 
Joseph Ludwig Marchelewicz 
Agnes Grimes McMahon 
Margaret Cornelia McMahon 
Charlotte Winifred Miller 
Charles Edwin Minarik 
Harold Edson Miner, Jr. 
Kenneth Carlyle Miner 
Charles William Moody 
Janice Munson 
Sarah Agnes Murphy 
Edmond Nash 
Harold Richmond Nelson 
Thorns, s Joseph Oliver 



<• 



V 



> 



TRUSTEE 



f 



THE MASSACHUSETTS AGRICULTURAL COLLEGE 



Joseph George O'Mara 
Alfreda Lucie Ordway 
Raymond Francis Pelissier 
Isabel Roberta Perkins 
Anita Leigh Pike 
John Polar 
Horace Lincoln Poole 
Townsend Henry Powell 
Arthur George Priest 
Granville Sherman Pruyne 
Arthur Alexander Riihimaki 
Richard Andrew Rowley 
Helen Howl and Rudman 
Paul Martin Runge 
Kenneth Carl Runvik 
John Bartlett Ryan, Jr. 
Seymour Bio is Scott 
William Michael Semanie 



Joseph John Sheff 

Sidney Shepard 

Parker Lincoln Sis son 

William Tyler Smith 

Harold Leroy Soule 

Charles Philip Stephan, Jr. 

Ralph Francis Sturtevant 

Robert Taft 

Marion Ruth Taylor 

Eleanor Townsend 

Stanley Warren Tyler 

Walter Sampson Utley 

Ruth Marion Vogel 

Harold Vita Montefiore Waite 

Willard Raymond Ytfard 

Richard Frank Whitcomb 

Maurice Francis White 

Sylvia Belle Wilson 



665 



Upon the recommendation of the Faculty it was 

VOTED : To confer the degree Bachelor of Vocational 
Agriculture upon Josta Andrew Karl son and 
Edwin James Thompson of the Class of 1933. 

Upon the recommendation of the Faculty of the 

Graduate School it was 

VOTED; To confer the degree Bachelor of Landscape 
Architecture upon Arthur Clement Marriott 
Johnson and Rudolph Olney Mono smith. 

Upon the recommendation of the Faculty of the 

Graduate School it was 

VOTED : To confer the degree Master of Science 

upon 42 candidates whose names are listed 
below. 



B. V. A. 
Degrees 



B. L. A. 
Degrees 



Julia Elizabeth Abbott 

Andrew Bremer Anderson 

Mary G. Baker 

John Harold Brockschmidt 

Herman Broudy 

Alfred Alexander Brown 

Carlos Nelson Butler, Jr. 

John Calvi 

Miriam Keith Clarke 

William Thornton Cowing 

Herbert Daniel Darling 

James Edward Doyle 

Stuart Deane Edmond 

Lawrence William Elliott 



Clifford Robert Foskett 
Albert Hugh Gower 
Pearl Richards Haddock 
Ruth Frances Hatch 
Richard Thomas Holway 
Lawrence Arthur Jones 
Robert Rolland Labarge 
John Anthony Langford 
Ella Margaret Ma honey 
Donald Mowatt Mason 
Ernest Wilson Mitchell, Jr. 
Helen Elizabeth Moriarty 
Michael Gerald O'Connor 
Walter John Osinski 



M. S. 
Degrees 



666 



TRUSTEE 



PH.D. Degree 



Scholarships 



THE MASSACHUSETTS AGRICULTURAL COLLEGE 



Ransom Clayton Packard 
Clarence Howard Parsons 
William Eoland Phinney 
Martin Peter Plant inga 
Lauti Samuel Ronka 
Paul Howard Ross* 
Ernest Gordon Smith 

^■Posthumous 



Lucian Bayard Spaulding 

Russell Mayo Spear 

Peter F. Stanne 

Earle Alexander Tompkins 

Melvin Harold Bfanegar 

Charles Butler Wendell, Jr. 

Forrest Earl Williams 



Upon the recommendation of the Faculty of the 

Graduate School it was 

VOTED: To confer the degree Doctor of Philosophy 
upon Mary Joan Foley. 

The Secretary reported the establishment of a 
new scholarship of #100 to be awarded to a member of the 
Junior or Senior Class at this College who is majoring 
in Horticulture, Landscape Architecture or Floriculture 
in preparation for one of these professions, established 
by the Garden Club Federation of Massachusetts in honor 
of Mrs. Thomas Motley^ Jr., in recognition of her ser- 
vice as founder and first president of the Garden Club 
Federation of Massachusetts, in appreciation of her 
activity for the promotion of Horticulture and as an ex- 
pression of the high esteem in which she is held by the 
Federation. 

Dr. Charles H. Hood has also announced his 

intention of continuing the Hood Dairy Scholarships for 

another year. It was 

VOTED : To accept these scholarships and to send to 
the donors a message of appreciation and 
thanks. 



e 



<• 



r 



3 



TRUSTEE 



667 



THE MASSACHUSETTS AGRICULTURAL COLLEGE 

The Treasurer announced the receipt of a be- 
quest of $15,000 made by the will of Mrs. Betsey Pinker ton. 
This bequest is to establish a fund, the income from which 
will be available for two scholarships for students from 
the city of Worcester who wish to pursue their education 
as students at this College. It was 

VOTED : To accept the Pinkerton Bequest. 

President Baker described the activities of the 

Alumni Committee with regard to student housing and 

dormitory construction. It was 

VOTED; To extend the thanks of the Trustees to the 
Alumni Committee for their active service 
in efforts to provide additional dormitory 
facilities at the College. 



Pinkerton 
Bequest 



Alumni 

Committee on 
Dormitories 



In accordance with action of the Trustees at 
the preceding meeting, the President reported that he 
had submitted to the Chairman of the Commisson on Ad- 
ministration and Finance a detailed project for the use 
of Federal Funds for unemployment relief, provided these 
funds become available in Massachusetts. 

Tentative plans for the inauguration of the 

President next fall were announced and it was 

VOTED ; That October 6 be selected as the date for 
the President's inauguration. 

Mr. Russell expressed his appreciation for the 
information which the President has been sending to mem- 
bers of the Board from time to time concerning college 



Projects for 
use of Federal 
Funds 



President's 

Inauguration 



66 



TRUSTEE 






THE MASSACHUSETTS AGRICULTURAL COLLEGE 

activities and Mr. Russell's sentiments were echoed by 
other members of the Board. 

The meeting adjourned at 11:20 A. M. 



Vice- 
President 




^Secretary 



e 



e 



£ 



> 



TRUSTEE 



> 



> 



669 



THE MASSACHUSETTS AGRICULTURAL COLLEGE 

MINUTES OF INFORMAL MEETING OF BOARD OF TRUSTEES 

Boston City Club, Boston, September 11, 1933, 1:00 P. M. 

PRESENT: Trustees Ellis, Preston, Frost, Dewey, 

Bowditch, Whitmore, Bacon, Griggs, Russell, 
Mrs. Leach, President Baker, Mr. Kenney. 

President Baker explained the situation regard- 
ing the construction projects proposed under the Emergency 
Federal Construction Program. The State Comidission on 
Emergency Public Works visited the College recently and 
investigated the proposals to build two dormitories, a 
library and to reconstruct steam lines and replace 
electrical equipment. It is understood that the Com- 
mission has already approved the project last named. At 
the time of this visit, the proposal for an entirely new 
library building was compared with that to reconstruct 
the present building and seemed to meet with favorable 
consideration by the Commission. 

In order to determine the attitude of the 
Trustees regarding the two alternatives for library con- 
struction, the Chairman asked each member present to state 
his preference. The following stated that they would 
prefer the construction of an entirely new building: 
Trustees Frost, Russell, Dewey, Preston, Bowditch, 
Bacon, Griggs, Mrs. Leach. Mr. Whitmore stated that he 
would prefer a new building provided an adequate structure 
could be erected for the funds, which ke understood to 
be available, $200,000. 

The Secretary described the plans for the 

inauguration for the President October 6th. 



Library 
Construction 



670 



TRUSTEE 



THE MASSACHUSETTS AGRICULTURAL COLLEGE 



& 



The meeting adjourned at 1:15 P.M. 




Vice 
President 



Secretary 



AHNUAL BUDGET MEETING OF BOARD OF TRUSTEES 
September 28, 1955 
Boston City Club - 11:00 A.M. 
Suggestive Order of Business 

1. Call to order by Chairman Ellis. 

2. Minutes of preceding meeting. 

5. Report and recommendation of Finance Committee on 
fa) Budget for Maintenance and 
(b) Budget for Special Construction 

4. Tuition and fees for Winter School. 

5. Repairs to Stockbridge House. 

6. Resignations, Appointments, Promotions. 

7. Report on Building Projects under NRA 

Appointment of Architect for Library 
Selection of Site for Library 

8. Report on student enrollment for 1953-54 

9. Report on plans for the Inauguration. 

10. New and unfinished business. 

11. Adjournment. 



<* 



<- 



^ 



TRUSTEE 



> 



^ 



THE MASSACHUSETTS AGRICULTURAL COLLEGE 

MINUTES OF MEETING OF BOARD OF TRUSTEES 

Boston City Club, Boston, September 28, 1935, 11:00 A. M. 

Chairman, Trustee Ellis, 

PRESENT : Trustees Ellis, Bowditch, Malcolm, Dewey, 
Gannon, Russell, Gilbert, Whitmore, 
Preston, Griggs, Smith, Mrs. Leach, 
President Baker. 

The following is the call for the meeting: 

September 14, 1933. 

To the Trustees of the 
Massachusetts State College 

Gentlemen: 

In accordance with the action of the Trustees at the 
semi-annual meeting, the budget meeting of the Board is 
hereby called to convene at the City Club in Boston on 
Thursday, September 28, at 11:00 A.M. The purpose of 
this meeting will be to act upon the recommendations of 
committees regarding the annual budget for the ensuing 
year and to consider such other matters as properly may be 
presented. 

Yours respectfully, 
/s/ Robert D. Plawley 
Secretary 

The minutes of the preceding meeting were 
approved without reading. 

Recommendation was received from the Trustee 

Committee on Finance in regard to the budget for the 

ensuing year. Following discussion it was 

VOTED : To adopt the budget for maintenance as 

recommended, consisting of |154,245 from 
Federal Funds and $944,195 from State Funds. 

It was 

VOTED : To approve the budget for special appro- 
priations consisting of twelve items, total- 
ing $862,000 with the understanding that the 
President is authorized to eliminate such 
items as may be advisable in view of appro- 
priations of funds under the NRA. 



67 



Call 



Minutes 



Budget 



672 



TRUSTEE 



Winter School 
Fee 



Stockbridge 

House 

Repairs 



vine 
Repairs 



Resignations 



Aooointnents 



THE MASSACHUSETTS AGRICULTURAL COLLEGE 

Upon the recommendation of the President, it wa 

VOTED : To charge a student health fee of CI. 50 

to students enrolled in the Winter School. 

■ L 'he President reported the very unsatisfactory 

state of repairs at the Stockbridge House and upon his 

recommendation, it was 

VOTED : To authorize the expenditure of $1,350 for 
repairs £o the foundation and other neces- 
sary repairs at this house. 

Recent heavy rains have caused severe washouts 

along the north wall of the ravine on the Campus and the 

need for concrete walls and repairs there was explained. 

It was 

VOTED: To approve the expenditure of $2,350 for a 
new concrete retaining wall and other re- 
pairs in the ravine. 

Upon the recommendation of the Trustee Com- 
mittee on Faculty and Program of Study, it was 

VOTED : To confirm the action of the President in 
accepting the resignation of Mrs. Madaline 
V. Cowing, Labor- tory Assistant in Home 
Economics, and ^r. Harold B. Rowe, Extension 
Specialist in Agricultural Economics, both 
of which became effective August 31, 1933. 

Upon the recommendation of the Trustee Com- 
mittee on Faculty and Program of Study, it ims 

VOTED : To confirm the action of the President in 
making the following new appointments; 

Evelyn A. Beaman, Instructor in English, September 1, 1933 

1,440. 
Harold W. Cary, Instructor in History, Seotember 1, 1933, 

$1,440. 
R. W. Fessenden, Assistant Professor in Chemistry, 

September 1, 1933, $2,130. 
Maxwell H. Goldberg, Instructor in English, 

September 1, 1933, $1,440. 

Vernon P. Helming, Instructor In English, 
September 1, 1933, $1,440. 



r 



r 



P 



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TRUSTEE 



> 



o 



THE MASSACHUSETTS AGRICULTURAL COLLEGE 



George A. Marston, Instructor in Mathematics, 

September 1, 1955, $1,440. 
Ralph W. Phillips, Instructor in Animal Husbandry, 

September 1, 1955, $1,680. 
J. Hany Rich, Assistant Professor of Forestry, 

September 1, 1955, $1,950 
William H. Ross, Laboratory Assistant in Physics, 

September 1, 1955, $1,050. 
Frederick S. Troy, Instructor in English, 

September 1, 1955, $1,440. 
George Westeott, Extension Specialist in Agricultural 

Economics, October 14, 1955, $5,240. 

It was 

VOTED : To approve the recommendation of the Com- 
mittee on Faculty and Program of Study that 
Dr. Gilbert be asked to prepare a suitable 
memorial statement for the Trustee records 
with reference to the death of Professor 
Patterson. 

It was 



673 



Ra 



VOTED : To confirm the action of the President in 
appointing Associate Professor Frank P. 
as Acting-Head of the Department of 
Languages and Literatures. 



nd 



Election of 
Professors 



Upon the recommendation of the Trustee Committed 

on Faculty and Program of Study, it was 

VOTED: To elect Associate Professor Frank P. Rand 
and Associate Professor Walter E. Prince 
to become Professors of English as of 
September 1, 1955, without increase in 
salary. 

Upon a similar recommendation from the Trustee 

Committee, it was 

VOTED : To elect Assistant Professor Ray E. Torrey Election of 
to become Associate Professor of Botany and Associate 
Assistant Professor Frank C. Moore to be- Professors 
come Associate Professor of Mathematics as 
of September 1, 1955, without increase in 
salary. 

Dr. Smith explained the need for some repre- 
sentative of the College to be present at the State 



Professor 
Patterson, 
Statement for 
Record 



Professor 
Rand 1 s 
Appointment 



674 



TRUSTEE 



Requirements 
for Entrance 
of Students 



French Fund 
Uses 



Death of 
ifcr. Gerrett 



THE MASSACHUSETTS AGRICULTURAL COLLEGE 

House, during the middle weeks in September and in June 
to answer the many requests for information concerning 
the College which are made there at that time. h e also 
raised the question as to the application of requirements 
for admission and in determining the qualifications of 
students for entrance under the present circumstances of 
limited enrollment. 

President Baker replied that arrangements would 
be made by which some representive of the College would 
be in attendance at the State House to answer requests 
for information particularly at the seasons when such in- 
formation is in greatest demand. He also explained that 
the satisfaction of entrance requirements is the primary 
factor considered in passing upon applicants for 
entrance. 

FT i 

■ L he Secretary explained the plans of the 
Facultv and Trustee Committee for the inauguration of the 
President on October 6th. 

-L'he President reported the accumulation of in- 
come in the French Fund and the need for using some of 
this to defray the expenses of coaches as well as students 
who travel to the various national judging contests. 
Upon his recommendation, it was 

VOTED ; That income from the French Fund may be 
used to defray the traveling expenses of 
faculty coaches who accompany student teams 
to judging contests. 

There was expression of t reen feeling of los$ 

sustained by the Trustees the College in the death 

on July 29th of Trustee Gerrett and it was 

VOTKD: To incorporate - memori; tatement into the 
official ree 1. 



• 



• 



• 






3 



TRUSTEE 



> 



THE MASSACHUSETTS AGRICULTURAL COLLEGE 

The President reported the progress which had 
been made in furthering the College projects for con- 
struction under the provisions of the National Recovery 
Act. Since the State Emergency Commission on Public 
Works had approved the project for the construction of 
a new library building on the Campus, it had been 
necessary to act quickly in the development of plans for 
such a building. After consideration of the matter, the 
President had asked the firm of Morse, Dickinson & 
Goodwin, architects, to prepare such plans. Upon his 
recommendation, it was 

VOTED: To confirm the action of the President in 
appointing Morse, Dickinson and Goodwin 
as architects for the new library building. 

The matter of selection of a site for the new 
library building is now imperative. In the discussion 
of the matter of selection of a site for the library, 
the need for a long-time plan for building locations was 
pointed out. It was suggested that the Faculty Com- 
mittee on Campus Plan be asked to give careful considera- 
tion to this matter and present its views. In view of 
the possible need for quick action on the matter, it was 

VOTED ; To authorize the Trustee Committee on 
. Buildings and Grounds to make final 
decision regarding the selection of a site 
for the new library building. 

It was explained that the College had been 

asked to submit a supplementary list of construction 

projects, and in reply to this request, the President 

had submitted the following list. 



675 



Architect 
for Library 



Site for 
Library 



676 



TRUSTEE 



Projects for 
NRA. 



Dining Hall 
Policy 



Adjournment 



THE MASSACHUSETTS AGRICULTURAL COLLEGE 

1. For roads, walks, and other improvements on 
the College Campus and at the Field Station 
and the Mount Toby Forest Reservation $ 75,500 

2. For the construction of a women's dormitory. 195,000 

3. Physics Laboratory 150,000 

4. Administration Building 200,000 

5. Home Economics Building 150,000 

Following discussion it was 

VOTED ; To approve the supplementary list of oro- 
jects submitted by the President for con- 
sideration under the provisions of the 
National Recovery Act. 

The President reported that he had recently 
held a conference with Comprtoller Murphy regarding the 
management of the College dining hall in which he stated 
the willingness of the College administration and the 
Board of Trustees to join with Mr. Murphy in a request to 
the Attorney-General for an opinion with regard to the 
questions which have been raised in connection with the 
policy of management. 

It was suggested that Trustee action might be 

desirable in the near future in connection with some of 

the construction projects now pending, and in view of 

this fact, at 2:20 P.M. it was 

VOTED: To adjourn this meeting to 1:00 P.M. on 

Friday, October 6, at the President's Office 
in Amherst. 

President's Office, Amherst, Mass., October 6, 1953, 1 P.M. 

Because of the lack of a quorum the adjourned 

meeting of the Boar^l was not held. 

M £&^ -M-gfident 



retary 




• 



• 




3 



TRUSTEE 



> 



*> 



THE MASSACHUSETTS AGRICULTURAL COLLEGE 

Honorable Frank Gerrett 
Trustee from 1907 to 1933 

For twenty-six years Honorable Frank Gerrett 
served this College as a member of its Board of Trustees. 
His death on July 22, 1933 has brought a keen realization 
of loss to his associates on the Board who grieve the los 
of a personal friend and a wise counselor. 

Mr. Gerrett served on committees of the 
Board of Trustees but was particularly active in matters 
concerning finance and the development of the physical 
plant. From 1926 until his death he served as auditor 
for the Board and from 1929 as Chairman of its Committee 
on Finance. Upon his sound jud^e^nt was based much of 
the financial policy of the institution. 

He has made many contributions to the welfare 
of this College and his memory will ever be cherished 
by this Board. 



676-A 



TRUSTEE 



THE MASSACHUSETTS AGRICULTURAL COLLEGE 



• 



• 



• 







<a 



TRUSTEE 



THE MASSACHUSETTS AGRICULTURAL COLLEGE 



677 



^ 



-> 



Boston, Mass. 
October 1, 1955 



Mrs. Mary A. Patterson 

Amherst 

Massachusetts 

My dear Mrs. Patterson: 

The Trustees of the Massachusetts State 
College offer you their profound sympathy for the great 
grief that has fallen upon you and hour household. 

Members of the Trustees as well as faculty, 
alumni and students held Professor Patterson in their 
highest esteem and his passing will be sincerely missed 
not alone by us individually but by hundreds of his 
friends who have the interests of the State College at 
heart. 

Very sincerely, 



/s/ Arthur W. Gilbert 



For the State College Trustees 



678 



TRUSTEE 



I. 

II. 

III. 



r.\ 



v. 

VI. 
VII. 

VIII. 
IX. 

... 



THE MASSACHUSETTS AGRICULTURAL COLLEGE 

70:::: muai 
of : 

sta: _ : 

9:30 .._, Thursday, January 

House , Be ton. 

LI Ler t t he Gc~ i President or 
tee Ellii Vice-Pre of the Board. 

[inutes of the last meeting of the Board. 

ppointment of it tee. 

(s.) Commi ee to ait on the Governor, 
(b) Nominating 

ports of .it tees id 3ti ns on Recommend 

(a) Committee on Extensi i Service - Trustee 

. y, Chairman. 

(b) Committee on acuity P ;udy - 

Trustee :~ , Chairman. 

(c) Committee ri tent ion - Trustee 

Pr : ■ : ". - ... "h ii \ n. 
(" aittee on I ___ I, 5s Gro n - Trustee 

His 3 i . n. 
(e) Dmmittee L :e - Trustee His, 

ort of - :_ sic for 3erio Feb: 1st 

to Nov / 50t '.'- - . 



• 



ons 



• 



i in: ncial Reoort 



port on P.W.A. " . ". . 

Coll 9. 



:ivities at the 



i _ . Affec bhe " ■ 11 e. 



'inish^ 'mess. 



-djournment . 



• 



a 



TRUSTEE 



^ 



> 



THE MASSACHUSETTS AGRICULTURAL COLLEGE 

MINUTES OF SEVEN 1 I ] . UAL MEETING D I 

State House, Boston, January 18, 1954, 9:50 A. It. 

Chairman, Vice-President Ellis. 

PP. iNT : Trustees Ellis, Bacon, wditch, Chandler, 

Frost, Gannon, Dewey, Gilbert, Griggs, 
Leach, lalcolm, Russell, Whitmore; Presi- 
dent Baker, Treasurer Kenney. 

The following is the call for the meeting: 

December , 19 "♦. 

To the Board of Trustees of 
Massachusetts State Colleg 

Gentlemen: 

In accordance with the provisions of the By-Laws, 
the annual meeting of the Board of Trustees of Massa- 
chusetts State' College is hereby called to convene at 
Room 136, State House, Boston, on Thursday, 
January 15, 1934, at 9:30 A.M. 



Yours respectfully, 

/s/ Robert D. Hawley 
Secret ry 

^he minutes of the preceding meeting were read 
and a proved . 

The Chairman appointed Trustees Chandler and 
Malcolm as a special committee to wait upon the Governor 
and notify him that the Board of Trustees was in session 
for its annual meeting , The Committee reported that be- 
cause of the pressure of offical business the Governor 
would not be able to meet with the Trustees at this time. 

The Chairman appointed Trustees Bowditch, Frost 
and Russell a special committee to present nominations 
for officers and committees for the ensuing year. 



679 



11 



.mu 



O'cro 



Commit tee 
to wait on 

Governor 



iinatinj 

it tee 



680 



TRUSTEE 



:•- ._ 
lqucl tion 



J . B , -___ ise 
Eme ritus 

.oiessor 



College 
An ige snt 



_ ics 

Sfta j - r 



ics, 
i : 



3V 
11 



THE MASSACHUSETTS AGRICULTURAL COLLEGE 



Trustee C idler reported for the Extension Cr .- 

mittee describing brief 1- the ress of the work during 

■ prece r. 

cting upon recommendations from the Committee 

on Faculty and Program of Study, it v.- 

VETEE: To authorize lajor course of st ~_ f 
len in Physical Education. 

It was 

VOTED ; To elect Dr. J. B. Lin Emeritus Professor 
of Chemistry. 

It was 

T .", TIP; I e rize the Presi it to enter into an 
arrangement with Dartmouth College by which 
underg: s ate st lents of our College may 
transfer to the School of Engineering at 

t uth after three years 1 work receiving 
our Bachelor's Degree after satisfactorily 
completing me year's work there an the 
Engineering Degree at Dartmc a after two 
years' wo rk th e r e . 

It was 

T "ETED : To authorize a jor course i me Economics 
in the Grac :- School- 
It 

VOTED : To s :rize the ^resident to proceed with 
he reorganization of the three a rtm .ts 
at the College tea Economics in 
accordance with plans presented. 

r. &ussell reported for the Committee on Experi- 
ment Stati stating t he Committee very 
fine report of progress fro irector. 

cting recc ls from the Committee 

on Build j G: 9 it was 

VOTED : That the proposed nei r litory be named 
Thatcher Hall. 



• 




• 



a 



TRUSTEE 



^ 



THE MASSACHUSETTS AGRICULTURAL COLLEGE 



It was 

VOTED : That the proposed new library be named 
Goodell Library. 

Acting upon recommendations from the Finance 

Committee , it was 

VOTED : That the income from the Wheeler Fund be 
available for meeting unusual expenses of 
the College at the discretion of the Presi- 
dent . 

It w, 

VOTED ; That the interest on active Student Trust 
Funds be available for use for the benefit 
of students at the discretion of the Presi- 
de fit. 

1 1 

VOTED : That the Reserve Fund of approximately 

$2,000 accumulated by the former Bookstore 
be transferred to the capital account of the 
Burnhai Emergency Fund. 

It was 

VOTED : That the following coaches of Student 

Activities be paid additional salary from 
Student Trust Funds for their extra ser- 
vices as follows: 

Professor Frank P. Hand, Dramatics ; Coach, 

$150 per year. 
Professor Welter E. Prince, Coach of 

Debating, $75 per y r. 
Professor Lawrence S. Dickinson, Business 

Manager, Academics Activities Board, 
150 per year. 
Assistant Dean Lanphear, Director, Student 

Government Accounts, $75 per year. 

It was 



VOTED: 



Tha" the report of John Bradford Davis, 



executor of the Estate of Clarence B 
late of Groveland, Massachusetts, be 
accepted and that the Treasurer of trie 
College be and hereby is authorized to 
approve said report. 



rifl 



rd: : 



j > 



681 



Goodell 
Library 



:>eler 
Fund 
Income 



Stude 
Trust 

Funds 
Income 



Bui 

Fund 

Transfei 



C . aches. 
Extra 
j_a r i e s 



Ear Estate 



6 



TRUSTEE 



Committee 

Actions 



Trustee 
Committee on 

Science 



Treasurer 1 s 
rt 



Tuition 
Legislation 



THE MASSACHUSETTS AGRICULTURAL COLLEGE 

It was 

VOTED : That all actions taken by Committees of the 
Trustees during the year which have not been 
approved subsequently by the Board of. Trustee 
by hero by approved. 

President Baker expressed his feelings that 
there was need of a Trustee Committee on Science which 
might represent the divisions of Physical and Biological 
Sciences and Social Science in the College as the Trustee 
Committees on Agriculture and Horticulture represent two 
Divisions of the College. He suggested the possibility 
of combining the Trustee Committees on Agriculture and 
Horticulture into one Committee and naming .one new Com- 
mittee for Science. He stated that he would make a 
definite recommendation to the Board at an early meeting . 

Treasurer Kenney presented the financial report 
of the institution for the year ending November SO, 1955, 
and upon the recommendation of the Finance Committee, it 
s 

VOTED : To accept the report and order it printed. 

The President presented a report of progress in 
c onne c t ion wi th the P . '. . . A . and. C . V. . A . pro j e c t s . 

He called to the attention of the Trustees cer- 
tain pending legislation which will affect the College 
if passed. There is a bill to increase tuition for 

■ ents from $100 to $150 p r -r year eh the President 
described as a very severe blow to educ i. his 
recommendation, it was 

VOTED : That the Trustees put before the Legislature 
in the most effective form the objections 
to increase i tuition at the College. 




^ 



TRUSTEE 



^ 



*> 



THE MASSACHUSETTS AGRICULTURAL COLLEGE 

Che President described the pending legislation 
which will tory upon the Trustees of the College Land 

:-LCS 



. carrying DUt of £ 1 nd economic survey in cooperation 

with other educ- ti n; 1 institutions, private agencies, 

etc. Upon the r inendation of the President, it 

VOTED ; To authorize the President to take such 

measures as may appear advisable to further 
legislation in the interests of a land 
economic survey. 

Trie President reported the contemplated action 
of the grain dealers who seek to have the fee of 80 for 
registration of brands under the Feed Control Law re- 
duced to $10. The present fee much more than pays for 
the cost of the service, but it is the feelinp of the 
Director of the Experiment Station that the service oug' 
to be extended to cover the newer fields of nutrition, 
in which case the present fee would not be out of pro- 



683 



Durvey 



Feed 



oortion. 



The President presented his annual - report. It 






VOTJiD ; To accept the report with appreciation and 
order it printed. 

The President reported the delay 'in the return 

of Professor Chenoweth from his leave of absence due to 

the incapacity which he suffered as the result of an 

automobile accident. He also reported the absence of 

Professor Farley who has had to have several operations 

on his eyes and whose leave the President has extended. 



President' s 
Report 



Leaves of 
sence, 

Chenoweth 



684 



TRUSTEE 



re Truck 
Purchase 



Cleric 

-rviee 
Survey 



action Df 

jers 



THE MASSACHUSETTS AGRICULTURAL COLLEGE 

It was 

T7 " ~ [ I : To approve the action of the Pr it in 
extending leave of 1 ence for Professor 
Chenoweth and Professor Farley. 

- .ere is a project in the torn of Amherst for 
the purchase of • "ire true' .u t, it 

ni" s been proposed that ' 5 College and Amherst Colle_ 

ly a portion of the required fund. _ 'he President • - 
plained the situation to the Trustees and s- ' ould 
take the matter to the Executive Committee if action were 
required before another mee " of the Board. 

The President described -cent surv . nd re- 
port of the clerical service of the Colle ich beer 

— ■ — - 

le by Mr. Smart and a c Lttee of the Faculty. die 

:re are sixty-six members of the clerical st : at the 
College, there are some Dep< rtments in whicl equate 
service is not pro 1 '! /resident feels that by 

readjustment these Departments ~ ed for without 

.rj lg additional personnel. His opinion is borne out by 
the report of the Committee and it is his plar t ke 
readjustments soon which v 111 provide more effective 
clerical service at the College. 

. Bowditch presented the report of the Nomina t- 
Lttee, recommending officers and committees of 
the Bo- ; rustees the ensuing year. The Secretary 

s instructed to cast one ballot b. ich it was 



unanimously 
VOTED: 



To elect the following officers and com- 
mittee of the E rd of Trustees for the 
ensuing r. 



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3 



TRUSTEE 



* 



THE MASSACHUSETTS AGRICULTURAL COLLEGE 



His Excellency Governor Joseph B. Ely of Boston, President 

George H. Ellis of West Newton, Vice-President 

Robert D. Hawley of Amherst, Secretary 

Fred C. Kenney,of Amherst, Treasurer 

Philip F. Vvhitmore of Sunderland, Adviser to Treasurer 

Executive Committee 



George H. Ellis, Chairman Philip F. Whitmore 

James F, Bacon 

Committee on Finance 



Philip F. Ahitmore, Chairmen John Chandler 
George H. Ellis 1 L. Frost 

Nathaniel I. .Bowditch Davis R. Dewey 

Charles . ! reston 

Comm i ttee on Faculty and Proar;: m of Study 



Davis R. Dewey, Chairman 

James F. Bacon 
Pay son Smith 

Mrs. Leach 

Committee on Agriculture 



John Chandler 
John F. Gannon 
Arthur '.. . Gilbert 



thaniel I. Bowditch, Arthur W. Gilbert 
Chairman 
David J. Malcolm George H. Ellis 

Philip F. Whitmore 



Committee on Horticulture 



Harold L. Frost, Chairman 
Howard S. Russell 
Charles H. Preston 

Mrs, Leach 

Committee on Experiment Station 



John Chandler 
Philip ~ . Whitmore 
Frederick D. Grit 



Charles H. Preston, Chairm- i 

r thu r v? . G i lb e r t 
Howard S. Russell 

Committee on Buildings and Grounds 



Harold L, Frost 
Philip F. Whitmore 
David J. Malcolm 



George H. Ellis, Chairm 
David J, Malcolm 

Lrs. Leach 



James F. Bacon 
Charles H. Preston 



685 



686 



THE MASSACHUSETTS AGRICULTURAL COLLEGE 



TRUSTEE 



Mr. whitmore, 

Financial 
-viser 



Committee on extension bervice 

John Chandler, Chairman 
N^ niel I. Ltch 
Frederick D. Grinds 

s. Leach 

Committee on Legislation. 

George H. Ellis,. Chairman 

James F. Bacon 



Davis R. De\ ey 
Joan F . )c nr±on 

. Gilbert 



Frederick £. Gri 



President Baker explained tae need of 
financial adviser to the Treasurer could serve with 
him in clip . coupons and in otaer fiscal its 

which r ire the assistance of a Trustee. r. Gerrett 
used to serve in this capaci" dth tl bitle of Auditor. 
=ver, since the t€ . n over the e "it 

of Trust Funds ace l1 , the 1 for s Trustee - a' 
is removed. i the recommendation of the President, 



it 



" TEI : 



To abolish the position of Trustee iitor 
and to elect Mr. Whitmore as Trustee - - :. T ri 
to" th< Ti per, compensati 2 t fixed 
by the Vice-Pr '. Lent of t l€ E ard, Presi- 
nt of the Coll , th T: rer. 

■ .n journ ' t IS: 20 * . 



Vice- 

. : :nt 




'ecretary 



The Special Committee appointed to fix the compensation 
of the Trustee Adviser to the Treasuer at a special meet- 
ing Voted : To fix this at one hundred dollars per year. 



t 



• 



• 






% 



MASSACHUSETTS STATE COLLEGE 



3 



* } 




Dept. Anjj^_ .Husbandry Date: November _2**»__1933l 

T 0: President, Baker 

Subject: Final Report of Campus Planning Committee 

The committee on campus planning, which was appointed by President Thatcher in 
1932 and which has now been superseded by a committee appointed by president Baker, 
desires to make the following final report: 

The committee suggests* 

1. That the general organization and building program on the campus be 
planned so as not to interfere with the sightliness and beauty of the present 
central open space. 

2. That buildings of such a general service nature that they affect the 
entire student body be located in the first zone immediately adjacent to the 
central open space. Library, dining hall, etc. 

3. That buildings dealing with services more specialized, and therefore 

3 affecting only certain groups of students, occupy the second zone. Agriculture, 
I Hoae Economics, etc. 



organ 



U, That buildings used by students, but not directly contributing to 
ized instruction, occupy the third zone. Dormitories. 



5# That buildings dealing with problems of general maintenance and 
physical service occupy the outer, or fourth zone. Heating plant, carpenter shop, 
horse barn, etc. 

With the above as a basis, the committee would also suggest that the following 
sites for new buildings be given consideration with the idea in mind, of course, 
that the student population at the Massachusetts State College may easily become 
five or six times its present size within the next fifteen to twenty years. 

Administration: Area between Clark Hall and the Broadfoot house or between 
the Phi Sigma Kappa house and the brook, 

Women's Physical Education: Opposite to, or to the north of Men's Physical 
Education building. 

Classroom building for Social Science Group: Area between North College and 
ravine. 

Physics* Adjacent to present Bacteriology building. 

Mathematics: In new Classroom building. 

Home Economics* Area in the second zone to the back and between French Hall 
and Fernald Hall. 

Signed: 



% 



m 



^ 



- 2 - 

Dormitories - Men: Adjacent to and south of Lovers' Lane, 

Dormitories - Women: On the higher levels east of Fernald Hall. 

Classroom building: Present chapel. 

Finally, this committee would urge very strongly that in the revamping 
and rebuilding of the service lines, steam, electricity, etc. on the campus, 
provision be made for extending these lines to the proposed new sites for the 
Women* s and Men f s Dormitory groups, and to any other sites where buildings may 
be located in the near future in order that location of buildings will not be 
dictated primarily by proximity to present service connections. 

Yours very truly, 



Chairman 




Vp- . *U 




% 



ft/tjnctmv*/ /Yfn&A 



O^Hu-pfLi^) 







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) 



.0 



cfe. 



< y 













* 



*> 



TRUSTEE 



^ 



3 



THE MASSACHUSETTS AGRICULTURAL COLLEGE 

iINUTES OF INFORi-1/.L vl^RTING OF THE BOARD . OF TEES 

Boston City Club, Boston, 12:30 P.M., May 9, 1- 

Chairman, Vice-Pr ' ent Ellis. 

PRESENT: Trustees E] , Gilbert, Frost, Buttrick, 
Bbwditch, ~y, Mrs. ^e ; Pr -'id ent 
Baker. 

President Baker had asked the Trustees living 

near Boston to meet with him at t j time in order to 

secure the s: : tures of e majority of the Board on the 

contract for the construction of the men's dormitory, and 

also to consider with them certain administrative 



687 



oroblems. 



The President described the oresent status of 



the project for renovation of Stockbridge House and pre- 
sented the estimate from Mr. Jewett, Superintendent of 
Buildings, as to cost for completi bhe work, ~ is work 
has been left unfinished - s result of the stopping of 

CWA work on the Campus. Treasurer Kenney and the 
President feel as the result of st f Mr. Je" 5t f s 

"ures that the project could be completed t cost of 
300. President Baker pointed out t t the Trustee 
Committee on Buildings and Grounds had previously 

thorized the expenditure of $1500 for the reconstruc- 
tion of certain mala campus road. However, after further 
consideration of this project, and in view of the 
fact that the relaying of steam lines on the Campus will 
probably involve tearing up some roads, it seems wiser 
to postpone this reconstruction until another year. The 
President recommended that he and Treasurer Kenney be 



Stockbridge 
House 



PuJ> 



688 



TRUSTEE 



Mail Polls 



Abigail 
Adams 
Improve- 
ment 



Horti- 
cultural 
Barn 

Reconstruc- 
tion 



THE MASSACHUSETTS AGRICULTURAL COLLEGE 

authorized to proceed with the completion of the re- 
construction of the Stockbridge House at a cost not 
exceeding §1800. It was 

VOTED : Tq approve the President 1 s recommendation. 

The ^resident discussed with the Trustees the 
matter of the il poll in connection with honorary 
degrees. He asked if there was any objection to taking 
"Up matters in this way where earl jcision was needed. 
Dr. Gilbert stated, that he felt that the matter of 
honorary degrees should be ndled at e neeting of the 
full Board where this is possible.. In general, however, 
there seemed to be no objection to mail voting. 

Trustee Frost asked that the names of Dr. Ballou 
and Dr. i*ounsburv be considered at some future "time as 
candidates for honorary degrees. 

The President described the need for a reception 
and recreation room in the basement of the —omen's dormi- 
tory and upon his recommendation, it was 

VOTKD: To authorize the expenditure of -.-400 for 
the construction of such a room. 

x he ^resident described plans for t] e noving of 
the Horticult" 1 '. Its reconstruction into a ward 

for the Infirmary. The Buildings and Grounds Committee 
of the Board of Trustees has authorized the expenditure 
of a sum not to exceec I 00 for the services of an archi- 
tect in this connection. ^ere disc .on for plans 
fo: r r erti for bids for this work ; Following 
Is discussion, it w< 



• 



• 




* 



TRUSTEE 






^ 




THE MASSACHUSETTS AGRICULTURAL COLLEGE 



VOTED : To authorize the President to proceed i 
soon as funds are available to advertise 
for bids for this work and to award the 
contract to the low bidder. 

The ^resident read several letters which he hi 

written the State auditor in connection with the audit of 

the Colli ^c counts in order that the Trustees might be 

familial ith t problems involved in this connection. 

Following a discus' of the audit of the colleg< 

accounts, the meeting was adjourned at i : P.M. 



i/fe, Aa ^cJcy J ^torch^-t^L 




Vice- 
President 



Secretary 



689 



690 



TRUSTEE 



Dr. Ellis* 
Illness 



Mr. Bowditch 
Chairman 



Call 



Convocation 



THE MASSACHUSETTS AGRICULTURAL COLLEGE 

MINUTES OF SPECIAL MEETING OF BOARD OF TRUSTEES 

President's Office, Amherst, May 24, 1934, 2:00 P. M. 

PRESENT : Messrs. Bowditch, Dewey, Frost, Malcolm 
Whitmore, Buttrick, Russell, Gannon, 
Griggs, Gilbert, Smith, Mrs. Leach, Mrs. 
Wilson; President Baker. 

President Baker reported the serious illness of 
Dr. Ellis, Vice-President of the Board. There was 
unanimous expression of deep regret and sympathy and the 
President was asked to convey this to Mrs. Ellis. 

In the absence of Dr. Ellis, Trustee Bowditch 
was elected temporary chairman. 

The following is the call for the meeting: 

Amherst, Mass. 
May 2, 1954. 

To the 

Trustees of Massachusetts State College: 

In accordance with the provisions of the By-Laws, a 
special meeting of the Board of Trustees of the Massa- 
chusetts State College Is hereby called to convene at the 
President's Office at Amherst on Thursday, May 24, 1934, 
at 10:30 A.M. 

The purpose of this meeting will be to attend the 
student convocation in the forenoon and to transact such 
matters of business In the afternoon as the President may 
present. 

Yours respectfully, 
/s/ Robert D. Hawley 
Secretary. 

Preceding the business session of the Board, the 
Trustees had met at the President's Office at 10:30 A.M 
for the purpose of proceeding in a group to Bowker Audi- 
torium where they had attended the student convocation. 
Mr. Malcolm and Dr. Dewey each addressed the students at 
this meeting. The convocation was followed by an informal 
luncheon meeting at Draper Hall. At this meeting Director 



# 






• 






691 



THE MASSACHUSETTS AGRICULTURAL COLLEGE 

Sievers of the Experiment Station described his proposal 
made to the President that the Hatch Expeiinent Station 
Barn be reconstructed into a small animal and nutrition 
laboratory. He presented plans indicating how the build- 
ing could be made very useful in this way and stated that 
the estimate of total cost was $16,000. 

The Director also explained his proposal for re- 
organization of the work in human and animal nutrition. 

Following the luncheon meeting the Trustees 
adjourned to the site of the new Goodell Library where 
simple exercises in connection with breaking the ground 
for this building were conducted. At these exercises 
Mr. Bowditch turned the first spadeful of earth and there 
were brief talks by Dr. J. B. Lindsey, Mr. Goodwin, archi- 
tect, Mr. Wood, Librarian, and President Baker. 

The business session of the meeting convened at 
2:00 P.M. in the President's Office. 

It was 

VOTED ; To dispense with the reading of the minutes 
of the previous meeting. 

Upon the recommendation of the President, it 

was 

VOTED : To authorize any two of the following named 
Trustees , Dr. George H. Ellis, Mr. 
Nathaniel I. Bowditch, Mr. David H. Buttrick, 
together with the Treasurer of the Board of 
Trustees, to assign or transfer any or all 
bonds and/or stocks now or hereafter 
registered in the name of Massachusetts State 
College. 

The minutes of the informal meeting of eight 

Trustees held in Boston on May 9th were read and it was 



Hatch Barn 
Reconstruction 



Nutrition 
Organization 



Library 
Exercises 



Minutes 



Transfer of 
Securities 



692 



TRUSTEE 



Committee 

Actions 

Approved 



THE MASSACHUSETTS AGRICULTURAL COLLEGE 



Stockbridge 
House 



Genetics 
Course 



VOTED ; To approve these minutes and to confirm 
the actions taken at this meeting. 

President Baker reported that the funds 

authorized for completing the reconstruction of the 

Stockbridge House will be adequate to do all the work 

there except the painting. He recommended that the 

interior painting be postponed, but that $175 be allowed 

for painting the exterior of the house- It was 

VOTED : To authorize the expenditure of $175 for the 
painting of the exterior of the Stockbridge 
House . 

President Baker presented with his approval the 
recommendation of the Faculty Committee on Course of 
Study for the establishment of a new course in Genetics 
and Eugenics to be given by Professor Rice of the Depart- 
ment of Animal Husbandry and to be known in the catalogue 
as Animal Husbandry 91, Genetics and Eugenics. In the 
discussion it was indicated that there was some question 
of the propriety of labeling this course Animal Husbandry. 
It was 

VOTED : To approve the course with the understanding 
that it be listed as Genetics and Eugenics. 

A report by Dean Machmer was presented by the 
President which explained recent changes in the freshman 
and sophomore curriculum in order to accommodate more 
satisfactorily the increasing enrollment in required 
courses in these two years. 

Mr. Malcolm raised a question as to why it was 
B. A. Degree necessary for the State College to require so much 

fundamental work in science- and why it should restrict 
itself to the granting of the Bachelor of Science degree. 



Changes in 
Freshman- 
Sophomore 
Curriculum 



• 



• 



' 



TRUSTEE 



* 



5 



THE MASSACHUSETTS AGRICULTURAL COLLEGE 



He stated that many citizens had questioned him concern- 
ing this matter and that he felt there was a growing 
demand for a broadening of the scope and the granting of 
the Bachelor of Arts degree. 

President Baker replied that he felt the College 
was making a sound growth under its present organization 
and objectives and that he felt the major problem was to 
strengthen the present curriculum rather than to expand 
it at the present time. 

Upon the recommendation of the President, the 

following actions concerning staff appointments were 

taken. It was 

VOTED : To promote Professor Frank Prentice Rand 
from Acting Head of the Department of 
Languages and Literature to Head of the De- 
partment at a salary of $3780 ($5420) to 
be effective September 1, 1934. 

It was 

VOTED ; To promote Dr. M. H. Goldberg from instructor 
to Assistant Professor of English at a salary 
of $2220 ($1950) per annum to be effective 
September 1, 1934. 

It was 

VOTED ; To appoint Mr. V. P. Helming from temporary 
instructor to instructor at $1500 per 
annum ($1620) . 

It was 

VOTED : To transfer Mr. J. G. Archibald from 

Assistant Research Professor of Chemistry to 
Assistant Research Professor of Animal 
Husbandry. 

It was 

VOTED ; To confirm the action of the president in 

appointing Mr. George W. Yi/estcott, Extension 
Specialist in Agricultural Economics at a 
salary of $3600 ($3420) effective October 14, 
1933. 



693 



Staff Changes 



694 



TRUSTEE 



Resignations 



Committee 
Reports 



R.O.T.C. 
Building 



Mr. Preston* s 
Death 



THE MASSACHUSETTS AGRICULTURAL COLLEGE 

It was 

VOTED ; To approve the change in the position of 

part-time instructor in Botany at #1000 to 
full-time instructor at 01620 (#1500) effec- 
tive September 1, 1934. 

It was 

VOTED ; To approve the change of the other Dart-time 
instructorship in Botany at #1000 to 
Graduate Assistartship at $600 making in all 
19 Graduate Assistantships in the College. 

It was 

VOTED ; To authorize the increase in the proportion 
of the salary of Assistant Professor Taube 
now paid from Athletic Trust Funds from 
$1350 to #1500 effective June 1, 1934, making 
Professor Taube f s salary $3660 (S3720, on 
December 1.) 

It was 

VOTED ; To confirm the action of the President in 
accepting the following resignations; 

Dr. x Bernice C. Wait, Assistant Research Professor, Home 
Economics, #2760, effective February 28, 1934. 

Miss Mary Pozzi, Assistant Extension Specialist in Home 
Economics, #2700, effective June 30, 1934. 

The President presented as reports of progress 
a statement from each of two temporary Faculty committees, 
one on State Relationships and the other on Curriculum. 

The prospect of the construction of an R.O.T.C. 
building on this Campus by the Federal Government was 
described by the President. 

It was 

VOTED ; That the Board of Trustees, deeply grieved by 
the death of their fellow trustee and friend, 
Charles H. Preston, hereby order the follow- 
ing statement inscribed upon the permanent 
records of the Board as a slight tribute 
to his memory. 

"The Massachusetts State College has sustained 

a distinct loss in the death of Charles H. Preston, 



• 



• 



• 



a 



TRUSTEE 



^ 



» 



— 



695 



THE MASSACHUSETTS AGRICULTURAL COLLEGE 

Alumnus of the College in the Class of 1883, and member 
of its Board of Trustees for thirty -one years. Mr. 
Preston was Chairman of the Trustee Committee on Experi- 
ment Station for thirty years and a member of the Com- 
mittees on Finance, Building and Grounds, and Horticulture. 

"Ever generous of his time and effort in the 
service of the College, his advice was frequently sought, 
particularly in matters pertaining to research and to 
finance in which fields he was so well qualified to 
guide. 

"The Trustees not only cherish the splendid 
record of his service, but perhaps even more, his friend- 
ly ani. gracious manner displayed in all of his relation- 
ships with them. His passing on is deeply grieved but 
his memory will always be honored by this Board." 

It was 

VOTED: That the Board of Trustees accept with deep 
appreciation the splendid portrait of the 
late Dr. William Wheeler, formerly Vice- 
Chairman of the Board, and hereby authorize 
the Secretary to express to Mrs. Wheeler 
their sincere thanks for this gift to the 
College. 

Petition was received through the President from 

the lambda Chi Alpha fraternity for an extension of the 

option on the building lot on Horth Pleasant Street owned 

by the College. It was 

VOTED ; To grant this extension for the period of 
six months. 

The President reported the invitation which had 

been received by Director Sievers to serve as Director 

of the Frasch Foundation for Chemical Research which 



Dr. Wheeler's 
Portrait 



Option to 
Lambda Chi 
Alpha 



Director 
Sievers, 

Fraskh 

Director 






696 



TRUSTEE 



Honorary 
Degrees 



THE MASSACHUSETTS AGRICULTURAL COLLEGE 

v/hich position had formerly been held by Dr. Thatcher. In 
view of the fact that this appointment would not interfere 
with Director Sievers 1 service to the College, the Presi- 
dent had tentatively approved it, but asked the Board for 
confirmation of his action. It was 

VOTED ; To confirm the action of the President in 
approving the appointment of Director 
Sievers as Director of the Frasch Foundation. 

President Baker announced that in accordance 

with the mail poll of the Board of Trustees it was 

VOTED ; To confer the honorary degree, Doctor of 

Science, upon Professor Ralph E. Smith and 
upon Dr. Joel E. Goldthwait. 

There was discussion of the question of policy 
in connection with the ay/arding of honorary degrees. The 
President was asked to bring ,this matter to the attention 
of the Trustees at the fall meeting of the Board with the 
object of determining, if possible, at that time, upon a 
definite policy in connection with the awarding of 
honorary degrees. 

The President presented the recommendation from 

the Faculty that Mr. Horace A. Moses be awarded the 

honorary degree, Doctor of ^aws. It was 

VOTED ; To confer upon Mr. Horace A. Moses the 
honorary degree Doctor of Laws. 



The meeting adjourned at 4; 30 P.M. 



Acting Vice- 
President 




Secretary 



• 



• 



• 



•> 



TRUSTEE 



THE MASSACHUSETTS AGRICULTURAL COLLEGE 



MINUTES OF COMMENCEMENT MEETING OF BOARD OF TRUSTEES 



President's Office, Amherst, IOjOO A.M., June 11, 1954 

PRESENT : Trustees Bowditch, Frost, Griggs, 

Whitmore, Buttrick, Malcolm; President 
Baker. 



meeting 



President Baker presided at the ooenin£ of the 



The following is the call for the meeting: 



Amherst, Mass. 
June 1, 1954 



To the Board of Trustees 
Massachusetts State College 



In accordance with the provisions of the By-Laws, 
the semi-annual meeting of the Board of Trustees is here- 
by called to convene at the President's Office at Amherst 
at ten o'clock in the morning on Monday, June 11, 1934. 
The purpose of this meeting will be to pass upon the 
awarding of degrees and to consider such other matters 
as properly may be presented. 

Respectfully yours, 
/s/ Robert D. fiawley 
Secretary. 

Upon motion by Mr. Frost, duly seconded, it was 

unanimously 

VOTED : To elect Mr. Bowditch as Vice-President of 
the Board for the remainder of the year. 

^r. Bowditch served as Chairman of the meeting. 

One hundred sixty candidates as listed below 

were presented by the President upon the recommendation 

of the Faculty for the award of the degree, Bachelor of 

Science. ' It was 

VOTE D: To confer the degree, Bachelor of Science, 
upon the 160 members of the Class of 1934 
as listed below: 



697 



Call 



Mr. Bowditch 

Elected 

Vice-President 



B.S. Degree 



69: 



TRUSTEE 



THE MASSACHUSETTS AGRICULTURAL COLLEGE 



Magna Cum Laude 

David Willi&m Caird 
Randall Knight Cole 
Hyman Samuel Denmark 
Archie Arthur Hoffman 
Mary Isabelle Taylor 



# 



Cum Laude 



Roger Gordon Bates 
George Albert Bourgeois, 3rd 
Ruth Dexter Campbell 
Frederick Griswold Clark - 
Alvan Sherman Ryan 



Rite 



Laura Elizabeth Adams 
Gordon Ellery Ainsw©rth 
Herbert Roger Alton 
Alice Gunhild Anderson 
Wilmer Dwight Barrett 
Frank Arthur Bat stone, Jr. 
Barry Bernard Bernstein 
David Louis Bick 
George Harrison Bigelow 
Leonard Joseph Bingham 
Ethel Winifred Blatchford 
Gerald Thomas Bowler 
Muriel Vila Brackett 
Samuel Br e snick 
Chester Cromwell Brown 
Raymond Francis Burke 
Franklin Gilmore Burr 
Louis Joseph Bush 
Elinor Sherman Cande 
Erma Marie Carl 
Carolyn Marieta Caswell 
Norton Spencer Chapin 
Donald William Chase 
Greenleaf Tucker Chase 
Wallace Lea Chesbro 
Margaret Lydia Clark 
Edmund James Clow 
Raymond Dunham Coldwell 
Kendrick McDowell Cole 
Robert Taylor Coleman 
Elizabeth Addie Cook 
aces Lora Cook 



r id 
Florv 



ward 
Gloria 



Cosgfiff 

Cost 



Ralphael Fiorani Costello 

Roy Tapley Cowing 

Margaret Patricia Crean 
Richard Thompson Cutler 



French 



Chester Leroy 
Wilho Frigard 
William Kozlowski 
Harry Pyenson 



Roland Rogers Cutler, Jr. 
Darrell Alder son Dance 
Gordon Bowman Dennis 
Ralph Warren Dexter 
Dorothy Frances Doran 
Florence Augusta Duckering 
Charles Henry Dunphy 
William Donald Durell 
James Palmer Edney 
Celia Harriet Einbinder 
Catherine Maclnnis Ellis 
William Brigham Esselen, Jr 
John Biggs Farrar 
Josephine Frances Fisher 
James xi enry Flynn 
Alexander Harvey Freedman 
Marjorie Louise French 
Russell Thomas Gagnon 
Barbara Kimball Gerrard 
Robert Francis Gorey 
Arthur Allerton Green 
Norman Bulkeley Griswold 
Alice Severance Gunn 
Fanny Abigail Hager 
Edward Win slow Harvey 
Lillian Hannah Hast 
Elsie Elizabeth Healey 
Ralph Joseph Henry 
Charles Reitz Herbert 
Page Livingston Hiland 
Nathaniel Bar tram Hill 
Pauline Louise Hillberg 
Descom DeF. Hoagland, Jr. 
Alden Reginald Hodgen 
Charles Hurwitz 
Harriette Morgan Jackson 

Robert Crompton Jackson 
Herbert Jenkins 



* 



• 



3 



TRUSTEE 



•t 



3 



THE MASSACHUSETTS AGRICULTURAL COLLEGE 



LeClair 
Lincoln 

Lister, 



Jr. 



Mar j or ie Ann Jensen 
Erik Richard Karl son 
Milton Homer Kibbe 
James Shepard Klar 
Karol Joseph Kucinski 
Eliot Landsman 
Charles Alonzo 
Stephen Albert 
William Seaton 
Joseph Lojko* 

Alexander Ambrose Lucey, Jr. 
Russell Eldridge MacCleery 
Kathleen Jane MacDonald 
James Paige MacKimmie 
Carleton Archie MacMackin 
Robert Andrew Magay 
Shirley Elizabeth McCarthy 
Ambrose Thomas McGuckian 
Arthur Carlton Merrill, Jr. 
James Willis Merrill 
George Deming Moody 
David Charles Mountain 
Nathan Paddock Nichols 
Fred Jouett Nisbet 
Cornelius Francis ! Neil 
Walter Louis Papp 
Sarah Augusta Peaslee 
Harold Carpenter Potter 
John Frank Pozzi 
Ruth Pushee 

James Walter Robertson, 
Mark Henry Rogers 
Laura Elizabeth Rowland 
Raymond Edward Royal 



Jr. 



Nancy Elizabeth Russell 
Waldo Rufus Russell 
Wolcott Lawrence Schenck 
Harold Sc human 
Albert Sherman 
James Albert Sibson 
Howard Ralph Sievers 
Gladys Josephine Simmons 
Alberta Elizabeth Skipton 
Donald Hart well Smith 
Edith Janette Smith 
Russell Lirmell Snow 
Warren Hilbcurne Southworth 
Edwin Francis Steffek 
H. Paul Stephansen 
Malcolm Chamberlain Stewart 
Florence Pauline Stoeber 
Russell Sturtevant 
Russell Eugene Taft 
Edward James Talbot 
Elizabeth Alton Taylor 
Winthrop Snowdon Thomas 
Grace Elizabeth Tiffany 
Mary Arundale Tomlinson 
Henry Atchinson Walker 
Vernon Kenneth Watson 
Elizabeth Wheeler 
Nelson Adrian Wheeler 
Joan Elizabeth Wilcox 
Harold Spencer Wood 
Hillman Hathaway Wordell 
Edward Rochford Vs'yraan 
Joseph Francis Zielinski 
Jose pii Frank Zillman 

-"-Posthumous 



699 



Upon the recommendation of the Faculty, it was 

VOTED; To confer the degree, Bachelor of Vocational 
Agriculture, upon Robert Reed Stoekbridge 
of the Class of 1934. 

Upon the recommendation of the Faculty of the 

Graduate School, it was 

VOTED ; To confer the degree, Bachelor of Landscape 
Architecture, upon J. Lee Brown, Neal A. 
Butterfield, and Robert Milton Howes. 



.V.A. Degree 



B.L.A. Degree 



700 



TRUSTEE 



:.S. Degree 



THE MASSACHUSETTS AGRICULTURAL COLLEGE 

Upon the recommendation of the Faculty of the 

Graduate School, it was 

VOTED ; To confer the degree, Master of Science, 

upon the twenty-six candidates whose names 
are listed below: 



Emmett Bennett 
Mildred Shepard Brown 
Robert Edward Buck 
Kenneth Yv'illiam Chapman 
Matthew Cotton Darnell, Jr. 
Warren White Fa by an 
Robert Bliss Fletcher 
Elizabeth Frances Foley 
Constantine Joseph Gilgut 
Una Dean Hilliker 
Fred Painter Jeffrey 
Eugene Joseph Kane 
Agnes E. Knightly 



Richard P. Love joy 
Anthony Timothy Lyons 
Clara Luella Mclntire 
Willard Thomas Maloney 
Abraham Naoum 
John James ! Connell 
Leon Munroe Orcutt 
Charles Rav/lings 
James Patrick Reynolds 
Roy C. Rice (in Absentia) 
Morrison Rogosa 
George Gilman Smith 
Bernard Eli Supowitz 



Upon the recommendation of the Faculty of the 

Graduate School, it was 

VOTED ; To confer the degree, Doctor of Philosophy, 
upon the six candidates whose names are 
listed below; 



Ph.D. Degree 



Dr. 

Chamberlain 

Elected' 

Goessmann 

Professor 



Reappoint- 
ments 



James John Chap 

Maurice Mortimer Cleveland 

Majel Margaret MacMasters 



Ralph Francis Nicker son 
Bryan Collins Redmon 
Laurence Whiople Spooner 



Upon the recommendation of the President, it 



was 



VOTED : To elect Dr. Joseph S. Chamberlain to be 

Goessmann Professor of Chemistry which title 
was formerly held by Dr. Joseph B. Lindsey. 

The President reported the expiration of the 

temporary appointments of four members of the professorial 

staff and upon his recommendation, it was 

VOTED : To appoint the following persons upon the 
basis of indefinite tenure: 



• 



• 







THE MASSACHUSETTS AGRICULTURAL COLLEGE 

Lyle L. Blundell, Professor of Horticulture 
Leon A. Bradley, Professor of Bacteriology 
Wellesley C. Harrington, Extension Specialist in Agri- 
cultural Engineering 
Roy E« Moser, Extension Specialist in Farm Management 

The ^resident discussed with the Trustees the 

type of brick to be used for the construction of the 

men's dormitory. Upon his recommendation, it was 

VOTED : To approve the use of the wire cut type of 
brick, made in Massachusetts, in the con- 
struction of this building and to authorize 
the President to change the contract if 
necessary to provide for the use of this 
type of brick. 

The President reported the steps which had been 

taken in following up the discussion of the last meeting 

relative to the remodeling of the Hatch Barn. Director 

Sievers has secured the authorization of the Federal 

Office of Experiment Stations to use such Federal Funds 

as are available for this purpose. In view of this 

situation, it was 

VOTED : That authority be granted to a special com- 
mittee of the Board composed of the Vice- 
President of the Board, President of the 
College, and Mr. Whitmore to use such Federal 
Funds as may be apportioned for the remodel- 
ing of the Hatch Barn to be used as a small 
animal laboratory and for experimental 
purposes. 

.There was expression of the deeply felt loss on 

the part of the Trustees through the death of Dr. Ellis, 

formerly Vice-President of the Board, and upon motion 

duly made and seconded, it was 

VOTED : That M r . Griggs and Mr. Hawley be appointed 
a committee to prepare a suitable resolution 
expressing the sentiment of the Board of 
Trustees for incorporation into the official 
records and for oresentation to Mrs. Ellis. 



701 



Bricks for 
Thatcher Hall 



Hatch Barn 
Reconstruction 



Memorial • 
Resolution for 
Dr. Ellis 



702 



TRUSTEE 



Date of 

Budget 

Meetings 



Bowker 
Acoustics 



Dr. 
Beaumont 



THE MASSACHUSETTS AGRICULTURAL COLLEGE 

It was 

VOTE D: To elect the Vice-President of the Board to 
serve as Chairman for the remainder of the 
year of the Committees on Buildings and 
Grounds, Legislation, and Executive Committee 

It was 

VOTED ; To hold the annual budget meeting of the 

Board of Trustees in Boston on September 27 
next, to be preceded by the necesarry Com- 
mittee meetings on September 26. 

President Baker explained the need for improv- 
ing the acoustical qualities of Bowker Auditorium and 
his plan to install a microphone and speakers at an ex- 
pense of approximately $200. 

Mr. Whitmor-e raised a question as to the status 
of Professor Beaumont. The President explained that he 
had extended the period of notification for one year with 
the definite understanding that Dr. Beaumont's appointment 
would expire on June 30, 1955. He further explained that 
some statements had been made by advocates of Dr. Beaumont 
regarding his abilities which were not true. While no 
formal action was taken, it seemed to be the desire of 
the Trustees to leave the matter entirely in the hands of 
the President. 

The meeting adjourned at 11:45 A.M. 



/fXL/^U^-^J J frhrnrh^ i frtksl 



dent 




Secretary 



• 



• 



• 



TRUSTEE 



*» 



*> 



THE MASSACHUSETTS AGRICULTURAL COLLEGE 

GEORGE H. ELLIS, LL.D. 

Memorial Statement for Records of the Board of Trustees, 

Massachusetts State College 



The death of George H. Ellis on May 25, 1954, 
took from the service of this College one who had been a 
pillar of strength on its Board of r rustees for thirty- 
four years. Throughout the long period of his service, 
Dr. Ellis' active interest in the affairs of the College 
never waned. Only a few days before his death he turned 
the first earth in the exercises marking the beginning of 
the construction of Thatcher Hall. 

At one time or another he served on nearly all 
of the various standing committees of the Board of Truste 



BS 



and since 1929 as its Vice-President. At the time of his 
death he was Chairman of the Committees on Buildings and 
Grounds, Legislation, and Executive, and was a member of 
the Committees on Agriculture and Finance. 

The trusteeship of the College was never in thb 
hands of one more capable or conscientious. From his long 
and successful business career and his years of public 
service, he brought a rich experience to the service of 
the College and through the years he generously devoted 
a large share of his time and thought to that service. 

It is a gratification to the Trustees to 
realize that some recognition of the outstanding service 
of Dr. Ellis was extended during his life when the 
honorary degree Doctor of Laws was conferred upon him at 
the Commencement exercises in 1933. 



703 



704 



TRUSTEE 



THE MASSACHUSETTS AGRICULTURAL COLLEGE 

In his passing we, the Trustees, have lost a loyal 
friend, and the College a wise and devoted counselor. It 
has been truly said that, in a large degree, the College 
itself is a monument to his faithful and wise trusteeship. 

IN MEMORIAM 

Frank Gerrett Charles H. Preston George H. Ellis 

A Tribute by Philip F. T »Vhitmore, Trustee 
Delivered at Commencement Exercises 
June 11, 1954. 

Since we last met upon this Commencement occasion, 
three esteemed members of the Board of Trustees have 
passed from among us. They were all men of high ideals 
and sound judgement who served this College long and well. 
The total period of their service as Trustees amounted to 
ninety-one yeans. 

Frank Gerrett was appointed to the Board in 1907 
by Governor Curtis Guild, Jr., and served continuously un- 
til his death on July 29, 1933. A lifelong resident of 
Greenfield, Massachusetts, he devoted a large share of his 
time to oublic service in his community, county, and state 
He held many public offices and the fruit of his wide 
experience was often harvested for the benefit of this 
C ollege. His advice in connection with the development 
of the farm and the physical plant was eagerly sought. 
He served on the committees representing these departments 
during his entire trusteeship. From 1926 until his death 
he served as Auditor of finances and from 1929 as Chairman 




• 




3 



TRUSTEE 



^ 



^ 



705 



THE MASSACHUSETTS AGRICULTURAL COLLEGE 

of the Committee on Finance. Upon his sound judgement 
was based much of the financial policy of the institution. 

iie has been greatly missed by his former associate^ 
on the Board of Trustees who feel in his passing the loss 
of a loyal personal friend and who realize that the Colleg 
has lost a conscientious and wise counselor. 

Charles H. Preston 1 s trusteeship began in 1903 wheji 
he was appointed by Governor John L. Bates and it continue 
without break until his death on February 10, 1934. His 
association with the College began as a student in 1879. 
He was graduated in 1883 and during the following year he 
served as chemist in the Experiment Station. 

During the long years of his service on the Board 
he was most closely identified with the work of the 
Experiment Station serving a-s member and for many years 
as chairman of the Trustees Committee in charge of the 
work of this dep rtraent. As Treasurer and President of th 
Danvers Savings Bank, he was acquainted with financial 
problems wh _ch enabled him to contribute a great deal to 
the administration of these affairs in the College. 

Mr. Preston had the unique distinction of being 
associated with the College as student, staff member, 
trustee, and father of two sons who are now honored alumni 
In his passing the College has sustained a great loss. The 
Trustees not only cherish the splendid record of his servipe, 
but perhaps even more, his friendly and gracious manner 
displayed in all his relationships with them. His passing 

is deeply grieved but his memory will always be honored by 
this Board. 



706 



TRUSTEE 



THE MASSACHUSETTS AGRICULTURAL COLLEGE 

It seems like only yesterday that George H. Ellis 
was with us. On May 7 he wielded the spade which first 
"broke ground for Thatcher Hall and his active interest 
and leadership in the affairs of the College continued 
practically to trie time of his death on May 25. 

His service as a Trustee of the College began 
with his appointment in 1900 by Governor W- Murray Crane 
and during the thirty-four years since he has always 
maintained a vital and active interest in the College. At 
one time or another he served on nearly all of the various 
standing committees of the Board, frequently as chairman, 
and since 1929 he has been our Trustee Vice-President, 
presiding at all meetings of the Board at which its 
President, the Governor of the Commonwealth, has been 
absent. 

The College recognized the long and distinguished 
public service of Mr. Ellis when a year ago, upon a 
similar occasion, it bestowed upon him the honorary degree, 
Doctor of Laws. At that time President Baker cited him 
as "Advocate of high causes, friend of deep and genial' 
loyalties, for many years faithful guardian of the peopled 
interests in our Commonwealth." 

Now he has gone and we miss him greatly, but we 
shall always be proud to have been associated with him 
and the Collere itself, in a larg^ decree, is a monument 
to his faithful and v/ise trusteeship. 



It is fitting that we pause a moment today to pay 

homage to these three men who h; ; ve ^'iven so much to the 
development of our College. 



• 



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THE MASSACHUSETTS AGRICULTURAL COLLEGE 



707 



MINUTES OF INFORMAL MEETING OF BOARD OF TRUSTEES 

Waltham Field Station, Waltham, July 19, 1934, 11:00 A.M. 

PRESENT: TrusteesBowditch, Frost, Russell, 

Buttrick, Mrs. Leach; President Baker. 

President Baker described the needs for re- 
construction of interior arrangements in the Bacteriology Bacteriolc 

Laboratory 
Laboratory to provide for increasing student enrollment Reconstruction 

in Bacteriology and Physiology. The plan is to remove 

certain partitions and construct additional tables to 

take care of Increased classes. The estimated cost is 

$5021. Upon his recommendation, it was 

VOTED : To authorize the expenditure of approxi- 
mately #5000 for reconstruction in the 
Bacteriology Laboratory. 

President Baker asked for reconsideration of 



the action of the Trustees in specifying the use of tne 
income from the Gleason Memorial Fund. The use of this 
fund was not specified by the donor but the Trustee Com- 
mittee on Finance, by their action on January 6, 1927, 
had indicated that it be used as a loan fund for students 
The President explained that through recent bequests and 
throLigh the use of money from the Lotta Agricultural 
Fund, loan funds were quite adequately provided and that 
there is growing urgent need for scholarship provisions. 
Following discussion, it was 

VOTED : To amend the action of the Trustee Com- 
mittee on Finance taken on January 6, 1927, 
so as to allow the income of the Gleason 
Fund to be used for scholarships to worthy 
students in accordance with regular pro- 
cedure established by the College. 



Gleason 
Fund, Use of 



708 



TRUSTEE 



Dr. 
Chamberlain 

Relinquishes 
Headship 



Election of 
Dr. Ritchie 






THE MASSACHUSETTS AGRICULTURAL COLLEGE 

The President presented the petition of Pro- 
fessor Chamberlain that he be relieved from duty as Head 
of the Department in order that he may give his spare 
time to teaching and research. It was 

VOTED: To grant this request of Dr. Chamberlain that 
he be relieved from administrative 
responsibilities as Head of the Department of 
Chemistry and continued as Goessmann Pro- 
fessor with deep appreciation of the splendid 
contribution which he has made through his 
service for the past twenty-five years. 

President Baker presented with his endorsement 

the recommendation of Director Sievers and Dr. Chamberlain 

for the appointment of Dr. Walter S. Ritchie, of the 

University of Missouri, as Professor of Chemistry and Head 

of the Department, in the position formerly occupied by 

Dr. Thatcher. The President explained that Director 

Sievers and Dr. Chamberlain had made a very thorough 

search for the best possible candidate for this position 

and that they presented their recommendation regarding Dr. 

Ritchie with great confidence as to his ability. It was 

VOTED: To elect Dr. Walter S. Ritchie as Professor 
of Chemistry and Head of the Department 
effective September 1, 1934, at a salary rate 
of $5560 with the understanding that this 
amount ?;ould probably be increased to $5600, 
the normal minimum for this grade, on 
December 1, 1954. 

The meeting adjourned at 11:50 A.M. 



t std sAo a* i^/ J~ 




Vice- 
President 




Secretary 



• 



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3 



THE MASSACHUSETTS AGRICULTURAL COLLEGE 



709 



I 



MINUTES OF INFORMAL MEETING OF BOaRD OF TRUSTEES 

Boston City Club, Boston, September 11, 1934, 1^:00 M. 

Chairman, Vice-President Bowditch. 

PRESENT : Trustees Bov/ditch, Dewey, Bacon, Buttrick, 
Gilbert, Malcolm, Russell, Whitmore, Mrs. 
Wilson, Mrs. Leach; President Baker, 
Treasurer Kenney, Director Sievers. 

President Baker described the plans of Archi- 
tect Goodwin for alterations of the old library building 
to accommodate the Division of Social Sciences when the 
new library building is completed. 

He reported that he had asked Architect Ross to 
draft tentative plans for the construction of a central 
garage building in which could be housed all college ownejd 
cars and which would also provide for repair shop and 
other accessory service. It is the, President 1 s thought 
that if further PWA funds are available such projects as 
this might be acceptable. 

The President read to the Trustees a letter 
from Mr. H. S. Houston,, of Holyoke, in which Mr. Houston 
announced his intentions of providing in his Will for a 
bequest of approximately $ 50, 000, the income from which 
is to be used for scholarships for worthy students from 
Hampshire and Hampden Counties. The President also 
reported on the progress of the PWA projects and showed 
the Trustees photographs which indicate the eitent to 
which construction has progress. 

Upon the recommendation of trie President, it wa 

VOTED ; To elect Professor W. S. Eisenmenger Head 
of the Department of Agronomy, 



Old Library 
Alterations 



Garage 
Plans 



Be cuest 
(Mr. H.S. 
Houston) 



Eisenmenger, 
Head of Depart- 
ment of 
Agronomy 



710 



TRUSTEE 



R. H. Barrett. 
Leave of 
Absence 



Dean Machmer 1 
Travel 



Title 
Changed at 

: It ham 
Station 



itcomb, 
Elected 

search 
Professor 



THE MASSACHUSETTS AGRICULTURAL COLLEGE 



Also, upon the recommendation of the President, it 



was 



VQT ED ; To grant leave of absence for professional 
improvement to Assistant Professor R. H. 
Barrett for the period June 15, 1954 to 
June 15, 1935, to enable him to take graduate 
work at Harvard University and to serve as a 
member of the staff of the Milk Administrator 
for the Boston district. It is understood 
that Professor Barrett will receive pay for 
the first six months of this period and will 
be absent without pay for the last six months 
and that the President is authorized to 
appoint a temporary instructor to assist in 
the work of the Department during Professor 
Barrett f s absence at a cost not to exceed 
that which will be saved by Professor 
Barrett's absence without pay. 

This action was taken in accordance with provisions 
for leaves of absence for professional improvement as 
adopted by the Board of Trustees on June 17, 1929. 

Upon the recommendation of the President, it was 

s VOTED : To approve the payment of travel expenses for 

Dean William L. Machmer to Cincinnati, Ohio 
to attend there the convention of Phi Beta 
Kappa. This expense not to exceed ^100 to be 
paid from income from Trust Funds. 

Upon the recommendation of the Committee on Experi- 
ment Station, it was 

VOTED ; That Mr. Paul Dempsey be transferred from 
Foreman at the Wait ham Field Station to 
Assistant Research Professor of Horticulture 
there; that Mr. Harold A. Wilson, now Techni- 
cal Assistant in Vegetable Gardening at the 
Waltham Field Station to Research Professor 
of Horticulture and Head of the Waltham Field 
Station. 

Director bievers recommended that Mr. Warren D. 
White omb, Assistant Research Professor of Entomology at 
the Waltham Field Station be promoted to Research Pro- 
fessor without change in salary. Following discussion, 



• 




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TRUSTEE 



THE MASSACHUSETTS AGRICULTURAL COLLEGE 

it was 

VOTE D: To elect Mr. •.:. D. l.hitcomb, Research Pro- 
fessor of Entomology, without change of 
salary. 

President Baker expressed his feeling that the 
Federal program of Public Works may be extended and con- 
tinued during the coming winter and his wish that the 
College be in a position to take advantage of any oppor- 
tunities for adding to its facilities which may be pre- 
sented. 

Following discussion upon motion by Dr. Gilbert, 

seconded by Mr. Buttritfk, it was 

VOTED : To authorize the President to make official 
request for further PWA, FERA, or other 
Federal funds for use at the College as may 
seem to him desirable. 

At the last meeting of the Board of Trustees, 

it was voted to hold the annual budget meeting of the full 

Board in Boston on September 27th. The Secretary pointed 

out that it has since been discovered that this makes a 

rather serious conflict for the administrative officers 

at the College and suggested that the date be reconsidered 

President Baker suggested that the meeting be held at 

the College in the forenoon of Saturday, September 29th, 

and following discussion, it was 

VOTED : To hold the meeting of the Board for con- 
sideration of the budget and other purposes 
at the College at Amherst at 10 o ! clock in 
the forenoon on Saturday, September 29,1954. 



ii 



he meeting adjourned at 1:20 P.M. 



Vice- 
President 





ecretary 



711 



Federal 

Building 

Program 



Date of 

^udget 

Meeting 



712 



TRUSTEE 



Budget 



THE MASSACHUSETTS AGRICULTURAL COLLEGE 

MINUT3-IS OF IJEETING OF BOARD OF TRUSTEES 

President's Office, Amherst, September 29, 1934, 10:15 Aid. 

Pf T: Trustees Gilbert, Buttrick, Griggs, 

Chandler, Malcolm, Russell, Forst, Whitmor^, 

Mrs. Leach, Mrs. Wilson; President r, 
Treasurer Kenney. 

In the absence of Vice-President Bowditch, the 
meeting ■ called to order by President Baker and Mr. 
Frost was elected temporary chairmen. 

e minutes of the- three preceding meetings- 
were summarized by the Secretary and approved. 

The budget for the maintenance of the College 
for the ensuing year as corrected and as recommended by 
various Trustee Committee was explained by the Secretary. 
The budget total was $1,233,122, of which $198,300 is 
expected to be derived from federal appropriations. The 
state fund budget amounted to Si, 054, 822 which is an in- 
crease of $110,905 over the appropriation of the current 
year. It was pointed out that, of this increase, 

7,548 is recuired to meet the restoration of salaries 
which has been ordered. Certain new services, such as 
research service for nurserymen of the state, research 
service for feed delaers in connection with the enforcemerr 
of the Feed Control Lav/, and requests for new positions 
to meet the increasing teaching load are principal 
reasons for the remain! Increase in the budget.' 

In accordance with action of the Trustee Com- 
mittee on Buildings and Grounds, the list of projects 

for special appro submitted in the order of 

importance as considered bv the administration. This 



• 



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«% 



TRUSTEE 



^ 







ILlluU ~ 



THE MASSACHUSETTS AGRICULTURAL COLLEGE 

list follows: 

Projec Amount 



Deoartment 



l.Home Econ )mics 
2. Physics 

3. General 

4. Social Sciences 

5. Physical Educ . 
6. General Main. 

7. General Mainr. 

8 . Veg . Gardening 
9. General Main. 

10. Dairy 

11. General Main. 

12. General Main, 



Vi omen's Build in g 
n of 
Bacteriology Lab. 
rd Building-Infirmary 

Competion & it 
Remodeling old Library 

and Eauinment 
Floor in Drill Hall 
Highway, Main entrance 

to r- 

ter mains for fire 
^otection 
3torj ge 

Large Incinerator 
Tiling Ice Cream Lab. 
Paint Shop 
Ash Stor^pe Tank 



50,000 
150,000 
10,0 

55,000 

3,6 

10,000 

10,000 
15,400 
6,500 
4,000 
2,500 
5 , 550 



98,550 
Mrs. Leach explained the need for t omen' s 
building as listed first. e and Mrs. Wilsor 1 spent 
a full day at the Col since the T] ;ee Committee 
meetings on September 11th investigating the needs and 
had concluded that the women's building need was more 
pressing than that of women 1 s dormitory as heretofore 

considered. 

- 

Mr. Grj asked the significance of the pro- 
posed construction of a women's building in terms of 
future development of the College. Does is im ex- 

nsion of a univer re? It seemed to be the 
consensus of opinion that the construction of : -omen 1 s 
building would no^ imply expansion of this character; 
that its construction is justified on the basis of pre- 
sent needs. Following extended discussion of women's 
work on the Campus, it was moved by Mr. Griggs and 
seconded by Mr. Chandler that tl roject for the 



713 



Special 
Appropri- 
ations 



ft'omen f s 
Building 



714 



TRUSTEE 



Dutch Elm 
Disease 



College 

Store 

Audit 



THE MASSACHUSETTS AGRICULTURAL COLLEGE 

construction of a women's dormitory be substituted for 

that of a women's building as first item in the list of 

projects for special n. The motion was lost 

by a vote of to five. Upon motion duly made and 

seconded, it was 

VOTED : To adopt the b t for the ensuin? year as 
presented, including items as follows: 

Maintenance 

State Funds ,034,822 

Federal Funds 198, 500 

Tot; 3 . 35,122 

For special appropriations, twelve items 

totaling $398,550 

President r submitted a report of recent 

conference at the College the bject of control of 

the Dutel ' n Disease which included a recommendation 

t Trustees include in the budget of the institution an 

item of $8,000 to enable the College to take an active 

part in this control service. Discussion of this 

proposal wa s post pone d . 

The President reported his action in ' aving a 

ivate firm audit the accounts of the Coll r Store which 

report indicated a sound business condition. It was 

VOTED : .To approve the action of the President in 
having the accounts of the College Store 
idited by a private firm. 

In accordance with notice included in the call 

for this meeting, amendment to the By-Laws as proposed 

as follows: To md the second paragraph of Article 1 

of the By-Laws which now reads: "The President of the 



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a 



TRUSTEE 



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THE MASSACHUSETTS AGRICULTURAL COLLEGE 



College shall be a member ex-officlo of all the stand- 
ing committees" so that this par ph e lall r ?, The 
Vice-President of the Board of Trustees and the President 
of the College shall be members ex-officio of all stand- 
ing committees." 
It was 

VOTED : To - lopt the amendment to the By-Laws as 
ro posed. 

Blatchford, Ethel W., Instructor in Physical Education, 

September 1, 1954, $1,500 ($1,620) 
Ellis, Willis D., Assistant Instructor in Education, 

September 1, 1934, $1,000 (Temporar 
Klein, 3ay T., Extension Specialist in Poultry Husbandry, 

September 1, 1954, $3,360 ($3,600) 
Mac-Masters, id ajel - 1 ., -^abor- t sistant in Chemistry, 

Se ' ^er 1, 1934, $1,080 ($1,140) (Temporary) 
Mc Int. ire, H. "uth, As sis t Ext ion Specialist in 

tome Economics, October 1, 1934, |2,520 ($2,700) 
Pray, Francis C, Assistant College Editor, February 1, 

1954, $810 
Putnam, ^rs. [ward &., House Mother, Abigail Adams Hall, 

Sept sr 1, 1934, $1,260 ($1,820) (Temporary) 
Rakieten, Nathan, Instructor in Physiolo?v, Z^ r 1, 

1954, ($1,620) 
Ritchie, V/alter S. , Professor of Chemistry and Head of 

Depart t, September 1, 1934, S3, 360 (^3,600) 
Stratton, Frank B., Instructor in Music, September 1, 

1954, §1,620, Temp8rary (State Funds §90CT, Student 

Acedmic Funds $720 ) 

it was 

VOTE D; ^o confirm the action of the President in 
making the appoir~ ; ^~ r - listed above. 

Dr. Gilbert did not vote on this motion. 

At the s stion ^^ President Baker, Pro- 
fessor Rice, Head of the division of Agriculture, 
invited to appear before the Board and present a report 
on the condition of the college flocks and herds. Pro- 
fessor Ri^e presented a mimeogr d statistical report 
to e member and described the situation in detail, 



715 



Amendment , 
By-Laws 



Appointments 



Farm 
Report 



716 



TRUSTEE 



Automobile 
Costs 



Lincoln 

Avenue 

Acquisition 



THE MASSACHUSETTS AGRICULTURAL COLLEGE 

particularly that r the problem of elimination 
of contagious abortion from the herd. He asked that the 
Trustee Committee on Agriculture plan to meet in the near 
future to give further consider n to this problem. 

At IS: 15 the Board adjourned to Draper Hall for 
lunch, and at 1:15 the business session was continued 
there with Mr. Chandler absent. 

^resident Baker presented a report on the use 
of privately owned automobiles for offical business, 
indicating that several members of the staff used their 
own cars' for this purpose to the extent of approximately 
|500 ach year per person in cost to the State. He 
stated that he felt that there might be some question as 
to the economy of this procedure compared -to the purchase 
of state automobiles which might be furnished to those 
who travel extensively, ^t seemed to be the general 
oninio-^ that the situation did not warrant immediate 



action. 



The ^resident described the need for the Colle 



to take over the section of Lincoln Avenue between the 

North ^adley n oad and the Physical Education Building. 

This road is no ,ir the property of the town and Tr et the 

town takes no responsibility for its ; ntenance since it 

is bordered on both sides by coll^ ^ropert T ". The 

President feels that owner shio by the College woul 

nea ble a better r ation of traffic and avoid 

misunderstandings as to maintenance. It was 

VOTED ; To ai rize the ^resident to negotiate for 
the acquisition of this portion of Lincoln 
Avenue . 



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THE MASSACHUSETTS AGRICULTURAL COLLEGE 

The need for refurnishing and refinishing the 
main recreation room and some of the other student rooms 
in Memorial Hall was explained by the President. A 
special committee of the faculty have studied the 
situation and made specific recommendations for such im- 
provements. The President recommended that he be 

thorized to use income accumulation In certain trust 

ids for this purpose. It was 

VOTED: To authorize the President to use such 

trust fund income as may be available in 
an amount not to exceed -P 9 000 for the re- 
furnishir id refinishing of certain rooms 
in Memorial Hall. 

Upon the recommendation of the Trustee Com- 
mittee on Finance, it was 

VOTED: To hold the meetings of Trustee Committees 
for consideration of the budget on the day 
prior to the meeting of the full Board for 
action thereon and to ask that the adminis- 
tration place in the hands of each member of 
the -Board two weeks before such meetings its 
proposal for the institutional budget for 
the ensuing year. 

Grov/ing requests for appointments as Insti- 
tutional Fellows from students in the Graduate School 
have seemed to indicate the need for a state lent of 

»licy in this connection and President BpJcer presented 
the following statement as a recommendation of the ad- 
ministration: 

,! The Trustees have ruled that employees of the 
College may be excused by the President from the payment 
of tuition. No others are eligible to the remission of 
is charge. , In order to avoid misunderstanding in the 
plication of this ruling to graduate students, only 









717 



Memorial 

Hall 

Refurnishing 



Budget 
Procedure 



Institutional 
Fellows 



Remission of 
Tuition 



718 



TRUSTEE 



Cornerstone 
Programs 



South College 

Room 

Assignments 



THE MASSACHUSETTS AGRICULTURAL COLLEGE 

those appointed by the ^resident to official positions in 
the institution have this charge remitted. Under- 
graduates are not eligible. Graduate students thus 
appointed and whose titles are not otherwise designated 
will be known as 'Institutional Fellows 1 ." It was 

VOTED: To approve the statement of policy regarding 
the appointment of Institutional Fellows as 
recommended by the President. 

There are a number of students who apply for 
enrollment in the Graduate School requesting the oppor- 
tunity to work out their tuition and director Sievers has 
asked that consideration be given to these students on 
the basis that they be allowed to have their tuition 
remitted provided they will render half-time service with- 
out pay. Following discussion, it was 

VOTED: To lay the matter on the table. 

President Baker announced the tentative program 
for the laying of the cornerstone of the two new build- 
ings on the forenoon of November third, next. 

He described the pressure for more office space 

and the necessity for taking over some of the students 1 

suites in South College this year. Also, it had seemed 

wise to reduce the number of student occupants per suite 

from four to two this year with a change in the room rent 

from $2.50 per week to £5.00 per week per person. It was 

VOTED : To confirm the - ction of the President in 
takin? over two ad ; suites in South 
College for administrative offices and in 
reducing the number of students per suite 
from four to two at a rental of $3.00 per 
person per week, and the President was 
gi- d au make such further ad- 

snts of snece in South College as may 
r-<nr>(*nv to him necessar -1 ■r^om th m<=> to time. 















5 



THE MASSACHUSETTS AGRICULTURAL COLLEGE 



Following further consideration of the recommen- 
dation of the special committee with regard to funds for 
control service in connection with the ^utch Elm Disease, 
it was 

VOTED : To include in the budget for the ensuing 
year an item for $8,000 to be used at the 
discretion of the President for Dutch Elm 
Disease control work by the College. 

It was suggested by Ir. Russell that a com- 
mittee of the Board of Trustees study the relationship of 
the work in Home Economics at this College to that of a 
similar nature in other state institutions and agencies 
and following discussion, it was 

VOTED : To request the Trustee Committee on Faculty 
and Program of Study to make a study of the 
plans for educational work in Home Economics 
at this College with the view to defining 
a policy regarding the development of specia 
courses for women and the relationship of 
this institution in this connection to other 
state administrative offices and agencies. 

The meeting adjourned at 2:15 P.M. 



. / rz^f£&^-<^f 




^. Vice- 
t>£ President 




Secretary 



719 



l>utch Elm 
Disease 
Appropri- 
ation 



Women's 

Work 

Study 



TRUSTEE 



I. 



IV, 



V. 

VI. 

VII. 

VIII. 
IX. 



THE MASSACHUSETTS AGRICULTURAL COLLEGE 

71BT ANNUAL MEETING 

BOARD OF TRUSTEES 

MASSACHUSETTS STATE COLLEGE 

9:30 A.M., Vtie dries day, January 16, 1955 

State House, Boston 



Call to order by the Governor of the Commonwealth 
or by Trustee Bowditch as Vice-President of the 
Board. 



II. Minutes of last meeting of the Board 



III. Appointment of Committees 

fa) Committee to Wait on the Governor. 
(b) Nominating Committee. 



Reports of Committees and Actions on Recommendations 



(a 
(b 
(c 
(d 

(e 
(f 



Committee on Faculty and Program of Study - 

Trustee Dewey, Chairman 
Committee on Buildings & Grounds - Trustee 

Bowditch, Chairman. 
Committee on Extension Service - Trustee 

Chandler, Chairman. 
Committee on Experiment Station - Trustee 

Bowditch, Chairman. 
Committee on Finance - Trustee whit more, 

C hair man. 
Nominating Committee. 



Report of President for the College Year ending 
November 30, 1934. 

Financial Report. 

Report on PWA and other Federal Activities at the 
College. 

Legislation Affecting the College. 

Unfinished and New business. 



X. d journment. 



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THE MASSACHUSETTS AGRICULTURAL COLLEGE 

MINUTES OF ANNUAL MEETING OF BOARD OF TRUSTEES 

State House, Boston, Mass. 9:30 A.M., January 16, 1935 

Chairman, Trustee Bowditch. 

PR] INT : Trustees ditch, Bacon, Chandler, 
Dewey, Frost, Mrs. Wilson, Guiett, 
Griggs, Mrs; "each, Malcolm, Buttrick, 
Russell, Smith, Whitmore, President Baker, 
also Treasurer Kenney. 

The following is the call for tne meeting: 

Amherst, Mass. 
January 4, 1955 

To the Trustees of the 
Massachusetts State College: 

In accordance with the provisions of the By-Laws, 
the annual meeting of the Board of Trustees of the Massa- 
chusetts State College is hereby called to convene at 
Room 136, State House, Boston, Massachusetts, on Wednes- 
day, January 16, 1935, at 9:30 A.M. 

The Standing Committees of the Board v v T ill meet as 
usual on the day preceding, Tuesday, January 15, in 
accordance with the schedule attached. lese Committee 
meetin ill Be held at the Boston City Club. 

Yours respectfully, 

/s/ Robert D. Hawley 
Secretary 

The minutes of tne preceding annual meeting 
were summarized by the Secretary and approved by the 
Board. 

The Chairman appointed Trustees Bacon and 
Griggs as a special committee to wait upon the Governor 
and notify him that the Board of Trustees was in session 
for its annual meeting. The Committee reported that be- 
cause of the pressure of official business, the Governor 
would not be able to meet with the Trustees at this time. 



721 



Call 



Minutes 



Committee 
to Wait on 
Governor 



722 



TRUSTEE 



Nominating 
Committee 



Dr . Guba ! s 
Leave 



T: . H. Ross, 
Promoted 



Engineering 
Reorganization 



Marshall 

Laboratory 
med 



THE MASSACHUSETTS AGRICULTURAL COLLEGE 

The Chairman appointed Trustees Whitmore, Frosty 
and Buttrick a special committee to present nominations 
for officers and committees for the ensuing year. 

Trustee Dewey reported the following recommen- 
dations from the Committee on Faculty and Program of 
Study: 

1. That leave of absence for one year be granted 
to Dr. E. F. Guba, Assistant Research Professor 
of Botany, for purposes of professional improve- 
ment, six months with pay and six months without 
pay in accordance with the plan for such leaves 
previously adopted oy the Board, 

2. That Dr. W # H. Ross, Laboratory Assistant in 
Physics, be promoted to Instructor in Physics 
without change in salary. 

3. That authority be granted to President Baker to 
proceed with plans for the reorganization of 
teaching in Engineering at the College in the 
interests of economy with the understanding that 
final plans will be submitted to the Trustees 
for approval before becoming effective. 

It was 

VOTED: To adopt the recommendations of the Com- 
mittee on Faculty and. Program of Study. 

Mr. Bowditch reported the following recommenda- 
tion from the Committee on Buildings and Grounds: 

That the present Microbiology Building be named 
Liar shall laboratory in honor of the late Dr. 
Charles E. Marshall, for many years Head of the De- 
partment of Microbiology and Director of the 
Graduate School. 

It was 

VOTED: To adopt the recommend i ion of the Committee 
on buildings and Grounds, 

No recommendations for action were received 

from the Committees on Experiment Station or Extension 

Service, 



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TRUSTEE 



5 



9 



THE MASSACHUSETTS AGRICULTURAL COLLEGE 

Mr. Bowditch reported the following recommen- 
dation from the Committee on Agriculture: 

That steps be taken as soon as possible to cleanse 
the herd of contagious abortion by the elimination 
of diseased cattle, and such other steps as may be 
necessary. It was 

VOTED : To adopt the recommendation of the Committee 
on A g r icultur e . 

Mr. Whitmore reported the following recommen- 
dations from the Committee on Finance: 

1. That the report of the Treasurer be accepted. 

2. That an expression of appreciation be extended 
to Mr. Bacon for his effort in representing the 
interests of the College in the litigation con- 
nected with the will of Betsey C. Pinkerton and 
that Mr. Bacon be authorized to negotiate a 
compromise by which the sum to which he feels 
the College is reasonably entitled be held in ' 
trust for the benefit of the residuary legatee 
during her life to revert to the College upon her 
death. If this compromise is not satisfactory 
to other parties at interest, it is recommended 
that the matter be referred to the Supreme Court 
for decision. 

3. That a bill be introduced in the present Legis- 
lature petitioning a revision of Chapter 75 of 
the General Laws giving the Board of Trustees 
power to designate to a person or persons 
authority to approve expenditures for maintenanc 
and to authorize the Legislative Committee of 
the Board to carry out the action contemplated. 



Following discussion of the matters presented 

in tiie report of the Finance Committee, it was 

VOTED : ^o refer with power to a special committee 
composed of President Baker and Trustee 
Bacon the matter of procedure with regard 
to the will of Betsey C. Pinkerton. 

It was 

VOTED: T authorize the President to submit a 

petition in the name of the Trustees for 
revision of Chapter 75, Section V, regard- 
ing expenditures for maintenance. 



72, 



Bang 1 s 

Disease 

Control 



Pinker ton 
Bequest 



Legislation 
regarding 
approval 
of expendi- 
ture 



724 



TRUSTEE 



President 1 s 
Report 



Administra- 
tive 

Relationships 



Treasurer* s 
Report 



proval of 
Committee 
Actions 



Investment 
Policy 



THE MASSACHUSETTS AGRICULTURAL COLLEGE 

President Baker presented his annual report, 
and it was 

VOTED: To accept the report with appreciation and 
order it printed. 

There was discussion of the relationshi] 

between the College and the Commission on Administration 

and Finance, and it was 

VOTED : To request the Legislative Committee of the 
Board to make a study of this situation to 
see what adjustments may be possible to im- 
prove administrative relationships between 
the Commission and the College, 

Treasurer Kenney presented his annual report 

— 

and it was 

VOTE D: To accept the report and order it print ec . 

It was 

VOTED : '-i-Iiat all actions taken by Committees of the 
Trustees during the year ich have not been 
apuroved subseouentlv by the Board of 
Trustees be hereby approved, 

e President presented a report covering F 
construction and other Federal activities at the College. 
Trustee Bacon raised a question with regard to 
policy of the Trustee Committee on Finance in invest- 
ing funds in public utilities in view of the present 
unstable situation. The matter was referred to the In- 
vestment Committee composed of Trustees Bowditch, 
itmore, and ^uttrick. 

In view of the fact that the investment of 
Trust Funds is not restricted by law, it was suggested 
that it mj : be advisable for the Trustees themselves 
to adopt certain restrictions as a definition of policy 

in this regard. 



• 



f 



725 



THE MASSACHUSETTS AGRICULTURAL COLLEGE 

^he matter of providing funds for the entertain- 
ment of distinguished visitors and visiting committees 
at the College was considered, having been previous] 
approved in principle by the Committee on Finsjice. It 
was 

VOTED: Jo authorize the Executive Committee of the 
Board to request authority from the Com- 
mission on Administration and Finance for 
setting aside a sum of $500 to meet the 
needs of the College in the coming year in 
the way of caring for individuals and groups 
visiting the College for inspection, con- 
ferences, etc. 

President Baker referred to the report of the 
auditor pointing out some of the comments and critici 
included in that report. 

The ^resident reported the resignation of LIr. 
Claude R. Kellogg, Assistant Professor of Entomology 
and Beekeeping, to be effective January 51, 1955, and 
the appointment of Dr. Helen. S. Mitchell, Research Pro- 
fessor of Home Economics to be effective February 11, 
1955. It was 

VOTED : To confirm the action of the President in 
accepting Professor Kellogg' s resignation 
and in appointing Dr. Mitchell. 

x he receipt of two ignificant gifts was re- 
ported by the President, one of £900 from the Rockefeller 
Foundation for research work in Psychology and one from 
the Carnegie F ouna ; a tion consisting of a musical library, 
text books, and a special instrument, valued in all at 

;500, for the furtherance of educational work in music at 
the College. 



Hospitality 
Fund 



Auditor 1 s 
Report 



C. R. Kello^s 
Resignation 



H.S.Mitchell's 
Appointment 



Gifts 



726 



TRUSTEE 



Library 

Historical 

Collection 



Election of 
Officers 



THE MASSACHUSETTS AGRICULTURAL COLLEGE 

It was suggested, by Trustee Russell that the 
Collie Librarian undertake the collection of historical 
papers bearing upon the agricultural industry and rural 
home life and that these be segregated in a special col- 
lection in the new library building. 

Trustee Whitmore presented the report of the 

Nominating Committee recommending officers and committees 

of the Board of Trustees for the ensuing year. The 

Secretary was instructed to cast one ballot by which it 

was unanimously 

VOTED : To elect the following officers and com- 
mittees of the Board of Trustees for the 
ensuing year. 

Officers of the Board of Trustees 

His Excellency James M. Cur ley of Boston, President 
Nathaniel I. Bowditch of Framingham, ^ice-President 
•Robert D. Hawley of Amherst, Secretary 
Fred C. Kenney of Amherst, Treasurer 

Committee on Finance 

Joseph *•. Bartlett, Chairman John Chandler 
David H. Buttrick Harold -« Frost 

Philip i 1 '. V/hitmore 

Committee on Faculty and Program of Study 

Davis R. Dewey, Chairman Fred D. Griggs 

James F. Bacon Payson Smith 

John F. Gannon David J. ^alcolm 

Mrs. Lottie A. Leach 



Committee on Agr iculture 

John Chandler, Chairman 
Edgar L. Gillett 

Committee on Horticultur e 

Harold L. Frost, Chairman 
%s. Lottie A. Leach 



David J. ivlalcolm 
Howard S. Russell 



Howard S. Russell 
Edgar L. Gillett 







t 



THE MASSACHUSETTS AGRSCULTURAL COLLEGE 



727 



Committ ee on Experiment Station 

David H. Buttrick, Chairman 
John Chandler 
Harold L. Frost 

Committee on Buildings and Grounds 



David J. Malcolm 
Howard S. Russell 
Philip F. Whitmore 



Philip F. Whitmore, Chairman David H. But trick 
James F. Bacon David J. Malcolm 

iVi rs. Bena Edge Wilson 



Committee on Extension Service 

Frederick D. Griggs, Chairman 
Mrs. Lottie A. Leach 
Mrs. -^ena Edge Wilson 

Committee on Legislation 

James F. Bacon, Chairman 

Frederick D. Griggs 

Executive Committee 



Pay son Smith 
Davis R. Dewey 
John F. Gannon 



Joseph W. Bartlett 



Nathaniel I. Bowditch, Chairman James F, Bacon 

Philip F. Whitmore 

r ^he meeting adjourned at 12:25 P.M. 



*ZL 



t /£ Oct*, c^f 




Vice 

President 




Secretary 



I & 



TRUSTEE 



THE MASSACHUSETTS AGRICULTURAL COLLEGE 

MINUTES OF INFORMAL MEETING OF GROUP OF TRUSTEES 

Boston City Club, Boston, February S, 1935, 4:00 P.M. 

PRESENT : Trustees Bowditeh, Griggs, Buttrick, 

Bacon; President Baker. Mr. Bowditch left 
early. 

President Baker described the problem which 
has arisen due to the necessity for so many leaves of 
absence on account of illness among the members of the 
staff. He feels that there is need for a definite policy 
in handling such leaves, and suggested that the Trustees 
give consideration to the formulation of such a policy. 
As a suggestion, he presented to the Trustees present a 
tentative statement of policy. 

To take care of the immediate situation and upon 

the President's recommendation, it was unanimously 

VOTED ; To be the sentiment of the Trustees present 
that leave of absence with pay for a period 
of three months be granted to Professor 
Cance, Professor Jefferson, and Dr. Foley 
who are necessarily absent because of 
illness. 

The President explained that because of illness 
also, Miss Knowlton, Assistant Professor of Home Economics 
has had to give up active teaching service for a period. 
She is able, however, to direct the work and keep in 
close touch with it. In view of this situation, the 
Trustees approved the President's recommendation that she 
be allowed to make her own arrangements with a substitute 
who vjould be approved by the administration. 

There was discussion of the various legislative 
bills of interest to the College. It was the opinion of 
the Trustees that the bill proposing the construction of 






» 



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T 



ft 






^ 



SUGGESTIVE ORDER OF BUSINESS 

FOR 
MEETING, BOARD OF TRUSTEES 

May 16, 1935 



10:30 A.M. Gathering at President's Office. 

11:00 A.M. Convocation Student Body at Bowker Auditorium. 

12:15 P.M. Luncheon, Draper Hall. 

1:15 P.M. Brief Inspection of New Buildings. 

2:00 P.M. Meeting of Board in President's Office. 

(1) Call to Order' by His Excellency, the 

Governor, or by the Vice-President. 

(2) Minutes of last Meeting of Board. 

(3) Confirmation of Committee Actions. 

(4) Financial Reports and Recommendations. 

a. State Appropriations. 

b. Federal Funds. 

c. Trust Funds. 

(5) Recommended Changes in Organizations of 

Divisions and Departments and in Courses. 

(6) Staff Changes. 

(7) Reports from Faculty Committees. 

a. On Relation of College to the State. 

(8) Recommendations from Board of Directors of 

Associate Alumni. 

(9) Unfinished and Nev; Business. 

(10) Adjournment. 

4:00 P.M. Meeting of Trustee Committee on Faculty and 

Course of Study. 

4:00 P.M. Ball Game 

to and 
6:00 P.M. Coffee at the President's House. 

6:45 P.M. Testimonial Dinner to Professor Ostrander. 



» 



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ft 



TRUSTEE 



3 



9 



THE MASSACHUSETTS AGRICULTURAL COLLEGE 

a nutrition laboratory should be withdrawn in view of the 
fact that consideration is to be given by the Committee 
on Ways and Means of an item in the budget of the College 
which proposes to provide for nutrition research. 
The meeting adjourned at 5:15 P.M. 




/^fc ecretary 



729 



MINUTES OF SPECIAL MEETING OF BOARD OF TRUSTEES 

President's Office, Amherst, May 16, 1955, 2:00 P.M. 

PRESENT : Trustees Bacon, Bartlett, Bowditch, 

^uttrick, Chandler, Dewey, Frost, Gillett, 
Griggs, Malcolm, Whitmore, Mrs. Leach, 
Mrs. Wilson; President Baker. 

The call for the meeting is as follows: 

Amherst, Mass. 
April 22, 1935 

To the Trustees of the 
Massachusetts State Gollege: 

In accordance with the provisions of the By-Laws, a 
Special Meeting of the Board of Trustees is hereby called 
to convene at the Office of the President of the College 
at Amherst on Thursday, May 16, 1935, at 10:50 A.M. 

The purpose of this meeting will be to participate 
in the student convocation at eleven o'clock on that day, 
to inspect buildings and equipment at the College, and to 
transact such matters of routine business as may be pre- 
sented by the President. 

Luncheon will be served at Draper Hall at twelve 
o'clock followed by inspection of the Campus and by the 
business meeting of the Board at 2:00 P.M. at the Presi- 
dent's Office. 

A notice of your intention to attend, which may be 
indicated on the enclosed card, will be much appreciated. 

Yours respectfully, 

/s/ Robert D. Hawley 
Secretary 



Call 



730 



TRUSTEE 



Business 

Manager 



THE MASSACHUSETTS AGRICULTURAL COLLEGE 

The Trustees met at the President's Office at 
10:50 A.M. and adjourned to Stockbridge Hall for the stu- 
dent convocation at 11:00 A.M. at which exercise Trustee 
Bartlett delivered the address. 

Following the convocation exercise, the Trustees 
met at Draper Hall for lunch. At the luncheon meeting 
President Baker spoke of the need and tentative plans for 
broadening the scope of the Extension Service of the 
College so that it would represent all of the educational 
interests of the institution. He presented to each 
Trustee a written report of the activities of the Speakers 
Bureau which is one phase of this broadened Extension Ser- 
vice. 

President Baker described the growth in duties 
and activities of the Treasurer's Office and the critical 
attitude of the state auditor with regard to some of the 
procedures of that office. He expressed his belief that 
largely increased responsibilities and duties without in- 
crease in personnel to handle them accounted for the 
difficulty of the situation and recommended that as soon a 
opportunity could be found, there be appointed a business 
manager for the institution, who would take over some of 
the responsibilities now assigned to the Treasurer. The 
President expressed the hope that federal legislation now 
pending in the form of the Jones-Bankhead Bills may pro- 
vide funds which can be used for this purpose. Following 

discussion it was 

VOTED : To authorize the ^resident to appoint a 

business manager for the institution whenever 
funds may become available which may be used 
fnv this nurnose. 



** 



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TRUSTEE 



s 






5 



Minutes 



131 



THE MASSACHUSETTS AGRICULTURAL COLLEGE 

The Trustees then visited the new buildings, 
Thatcher Hall, Infirmary Ward Building, and Goodell 
Library, reconvening at 2:25 P.M. at the Presidents 
Office, 

The minutes of the preceding meeting ?;ere 
referred to and it was 

VOTED : To dispense with the reading of the minutes. 

The minutes of the meeting of the Trustee Com- 
mittee on Buildings and Grounds, held on May 15, were 
read and it was 

VOTED : To confirm the actions of the Committee on 
Buildings and Grounds as recorded in these 
minut e s . 

The Treasurer presented a financial report show|- Financial 

Report 
ing that State Funds, Federal Funds, and Trust Funds were 



in satisfactory condition at time of report. 

Funds have been appropriated by the State 
Legislature to provide for salary increases this year in 
accordance with the step system of the state salary 
classification. This College has been asked to present 
recommendations for increases for its personnel in 
accordance with the classification system and the Presi- 
dent presented these recommendations to the Board of 
Trustees for approval. Follov/ing discussion in which 
question was raised concerning the wisdom of increasing 
salaries at this time, it was 

VOTED: To authorize the President to submit to the 
Personnel Director the list of salary in- 
creases as presented. 

Because of his unfamiliarity with the situation 

Mr. Bartlett asked to be excused from voting on the 



Buildings and 

Grounds 

Report 



Salary 
Increases 



13Z 



TRUSTEE 



Approval of 
Accounts 



Band 
Uniforms 



THE MASSACHUSETTS AGRICULTURAL COLLEGE 

question of salaries. 

The legislative bill regarding approval of 

accounts submitted by the Legislative Committee of the 

Board in accordance with authority of the Board has 

passed the House and is now in the State Senate where it 

is expected that it will soon be passed. In order to be 

prepared to take advantage of the provisions of this 

bill, if and when it is enacted, and in accordance with 

its provision, it was 

VOTED ; To authorize the Vice-President of the 
Board to appoint the President of the 
College as its representative in signing 
schedules for payment of all bills of the 
College. 

Subsequently, the Vice-President of the Board 
did appoint the President of the College to sign such 
schedules for the Board of Trustees. 

President Baker described the progress which 
has been made this year in developing a very satisfactory 
student band. The student manager of this organization 
has raised from various student fund sources approximate- 
ly one thousand dollars with which to purchase uniforms 
for the band. These funds were secured from the follow- 
ing sources: 

Senate $500 

W.S.G.A 100 

Stockbridge School 100 

Athletics 100 

From three lower classes. . . . 150 

Band 21.25 

$971.25 



* 



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•) 



TRUSTEE 



0£\ 



THE MASSACHUSETTS AGRICULTURAL COLLEGE 

Ihe President asked that the action of the 
Treasurer in advancing these student funds for the pur- 
chase of band uniforms be confirmed by the Board, and in 
accordance therewith, it was 

VOTED : To confirm the action of the Treasurer in 
advancing money from student fund accounts 
for the purchase of band uniforms. 

The President described the situation regard- 
ing the use of income from the Burnharn and Sessions Trust 
Funds. Both of these funds are gifts to the College, the 
income from which is available for use for the benefit of 
the College without restrictions. It has been customary 
for many years to use this income at the discretion Of 
the President to meet unusual situations in which the use 
of State Funds may not be possible or convenient. Since 
there is, apparently, no record of definite action by the 
Board of Trustees authorizing the President to use the in- 
come from these funds at his discretion as he has been 
authorized to do in the case of the Wheeler Fund, it was 
recommended that such authorization be given. In 
consequence of this recommendation, it was 

VOTED ; To authorize the President to use the in- 
come from the Burnharn Fund and the Sessions 
Fund for meeting the unusual expense^ of the 
College at his discretion. 

Ihe President announced that on behalf of the 

College he had agreed to a compromise settlement in the 

sum of $4500 with respect to the legacy given to the 

College (for scholarship purposes) in the thirty-first 

clause of the Will of Betsey C. Pinker ton, late of 

Worcester, deceased, and he presented to the meeting and 



733 



Burnharn and 
Sessions 
Funds - Use 
of Income 



Pinkefton 
Bequest 



734 



TRUSTEE 



Gift to 
4-H Clubs 



Federal 
Legislai ion 



Audit 



THE MASSACHUSETTS AGRICULTURAL COLLEGE 

read a form of release to be furnished by the College to 

Willis E. Sibley, executor of said Will. The President 

expressed appreciation of the College for the assistance 

of Trustee Bacon in this connection. 

Upon motion, duly seconded, it was unanimously 

VOTED ; To approve, ratify and confirm the compro- 
mise agreement made on behalf of the College 
with Willis E. Sibley, executor of the Will 
of Betsey C. Pinkerton, late of Worcester, 
deceased, whereby the sum of forty-five 
hundred dollars ($4500) has been paid to, 
and received by, the College in full satis- 
faction of the legacy given to the College 
for scholarship purposes in the thirty-first 
clause of said Will; and that the Treasurer 
of the College be, and he hereby is, 
authorized, in the name and on behalf of tne 
College, to execute and deliver to said 
executor the form of release presented to 
this meeting and read by the President. 

Report was received from Mr. Farley, State 

Leader of 4-H Clubs, concerning offer of a gift of $500 

from Mr. C. L. Horn of Minneapolis to be used for the 

promotion of a conservation program in the 4-H club work 

in this State. It was 

VOTED ; To authorize acceptance of this gift for use 
in the 4-H program, with the understanding 
that no obligations or restrictions are in- 
volved in the acceptance of the gift. 

President Baker described in brief the Federal 
Jones-Bankhead Bills for increasing federal appropriation^ 
to Land-Grant Colleges in support of three phases of 
work in these colleges, Extension Service, Experiment 
Station, and Resident Instruction. This Bill has passed 
the House of Representatives in Congress. 

There was discussion of the criticism of the 



Auditor regarding the uses made of the income from Trust 



^^ 



{** 






•> 



TRUSTEE 



^ 



THE MASSACHUSETTS AGRICULTURAL COLLEGE 



Funds, particular consideration being given to the 
Question of advisability of joining with the Auditor in 
a question to the Attorney-General for opinion concern- 
ing these funds. As a result of this consideration, it 
was 

VOTED ; To lay the matter on the table. 

Request was received from Professor Hicks for 
authority to employ Mr. Avery Barrett, cashier in the 
Treasurer's Office for additional service as cashier at 
the gate for the more important athletic contests at an 
additional salary to be paid from Athletic Funds of two 
dollars a game. It was 

VOTED : To authorize such employment as requested 
by Professor Hicks. 

President Baker called the attention of the 

Trustees to the forthcoming retirement of Professor 

Ostrander at the close of the present college year. The 

following resolution was adopted in this connection: 

He, the Board of Trustees of the Massachusetts 
State College, are deeply appreciative of the long, faith- 
ful, and effective service rendered by John E. Ostrander 
as Professor and Head of the Department of Mathematics 
since 1897. Thirty-eight years of continuous work with 
students in the same college places him in a selected 
group and brings a personal reward that is peculiarly 
rich and distinctive. The scholarly dignified manner in 
which he taught his courses and directed the affairs of 
his Department has endeared him to his students and 
associates on the Faculty. 

"He richly merits the relief from active routine 
duties which will come with his retirement this June. 
We wish for him many added years of health and happiness 
and assure him a lasting place in our affections." 






Employment 
of Avery 
Barrett by 
Professor 

Hicks 



Professor 
Ostrander r s 
Retirement 



736 



TRUSTEE 



Professor 
Ostrander , 
Emeritus 
Professor 



Dr.. Beaumont, 
Termination of 
Appointment 



Staff Changes 



THE MASSACHUSETTS AGRICULTURAL COLLEGE 

In further consideration of Professor 

Ostrander f s retirement at the close of the present 

college year, it was 

VOTED ; To elect Mr. Ostrander Emeritus Professor 
of Mathematics, this title to become 
effective upon his retirement in June. 

President Baker brought to the attention of 
the Trustees the situation with regard to the termination 
of the appointment of Professor Beaumont, indicating 
action taken by the Board in 1933. Notice of such termi- 
nation had been given to Professor Beaumont in May, 1933, 
at which time one year's notice was given. This was ex- 
tended for an additional year in 1934, and it now stands 
that his appointment will terminate on June 30, 1935. 
The matter was brought to the attention of the Trustees 
again in 1934. The President presented two letters from 
Dr. Beaumont, one addressed to the Secretary requesting 
a hearing before the Executive Committee of the Board, 
and the other addressed to the President of the College 
protesting the action. Following discussion of the 
matter, it was 

VOTED ; To confirm again the action of the Presi- 
dent in terminating the appointment of 
Professor Beaumont. 

It was 

VOTED ; To instruct the Secretary that the 

Executive Committee of the Board does not 
wish to hear Dr. Beaumont regarding the 
matter. 

President Baker reported changes in the staff 

of the Military Department as follows; Major Horace T. 

Aplington is to succeed Colonel C. A. Romeyn as Pro- 

fessor of Military, Science and Tactics; Captain Leo B. 



^^ 






• 



TRUSTEE 



♦ 



♦ 



THE MASSACHUSETTS AGRICULTURAL COLLEGE 

Conner is to succeed Captain Dwight Hughes, Jr., as 

Assistant Professor of Military Science and Tactics, 

President Baker presented seven recommendations Reoo^t 

Committee 



737 



from the Cabinet to the Trustees which have resulted 
from the study and report of the Faculty Committee on 
State Relationships. There was discussion of these 
recommendations in which it was pointed out that they 
seem to be very broad in scope and to imply considerable 
expansion of the present program. The Trustees apparent- 
ly did not wish to convey by any action concerning these 
recommendations that they were ready at this time to 
confirm such expansion in activities as may be contem- 
plated. Following this discussion it was 

VOTED: To authorize a study of the several fields 
indicated and by the agencies suggested 
in the report for future report to the 
various committees of the Board of Trustees 
as appropriate in each case. 

The President presented recommendations from 
the administration for changes in the terms of employ- 
ment for the professional staff. 

The terms of employment for the professional 
staff as previously authorized by the Board of Trustees 
provide that appointments to grades below that of 
associate professor are for one year only and renewable 
annualy so long as service is satisfactory. Appointments 
to grades of associate professor and above are for three 
years in the first instance and indefinite thereafter so 
long as service continues satisfactory. It is felt by 
administrative officers of the College that the annual 



on State 
Relationships 



Terms of 
Employment - 
Professional 
Staff 



738 



TRUSTEE 



Reorganiza- 
tion of 
Economics 
Teaching 



THE MASSACHUSETTS AGRICULTURAL COLLEGE 

appointment basis for members of the professional staff 
is not satisfactory. It tends to create considerable 
uneasiness, and to feome extent, lowers the morale of the 
staff. Therefore, it is recommended that this provision 
in the terms of employment for the professional staff be 
changed so as to read "Appointments to the professional 
staff are for one year in the first instance and for in- 
definite tenure thereafter so long as service in and to 
the institution continues mutually satisfactory. H This 
revision would place all members of the professional 
staff on the same basis and would provide for one year 
of probationary service. 

In discussing this matter, it seemed to be the feel- 
ing of some of the Trustees that some differentiation 
should be made in terms of employment for members of the 
staff of different grades ana that possibly a longer 
probationary period than one year would prove advisable. 
As a result of this discussion, it was 

VOTED ; To refer the matter tothe Trustee Com- 
mittee on Faculty and Program of Study for 
a report at a future meeting of the Board. 

Pursuant to authority granted by the Board of 
Trustees, at its meeting on January 18, 1954, the Presi- 
dent presented the following recommendation for 
reorganization of the teaching of Economics: 

1. That the Department of Agricultural Economics as now 
organized be merged with the Department of Farm 
Management in the Division of Agriculture. That the 
merged Department be known as the Department of Agri- 
cultural Economics and Farm Ivianagement with Dr. 
Adrian H. Lindsey as Head of the Department. 



b 



% 



TRUSTEE 



• 



• 



THE MASSACHUSETTS AGRICULTURAL COLLEGE 

2. That the section of the Department of Economics, 
History and Sociology known as Economics be 
separated and set up as a Department of Economics in 
the Division of Social Sciences with Dr. A. E. Cance 
as Head of the Department, leaving the Department of 
History and Sociology with Professor A, A. Mackimmie 
as Head. 

3. That no new courses be established in this connection 
without approval of the Trustee Committee on Faculty 
and Program of Study, and that the rearrangement of 
present courses be carried out by the Heads of the 
three new Departments in consultation with the Dean 
and the President, and in time, to include this re- 
arrangement in the next issue of the College 
Catalogue. 

These recommendations met with the approval of 

the Trustees, and it was 

VOTE D: To authorize the President to carry out 
the reorganization as proposed for the 
teaching of Economics. 

The President described the need for a re- 
organization of the work in Physical Education, Health 
Service, and Athletics, and presented recommendations 
that the various activities under these Heads be organ- 
ized as a Division of Physical Education in the College, 
composed of Departments as follows 2 
1. 
2. 



5. 
4. 



was 



Department of Student Health, Dr. E. J. Radcliffe, 

Head of Department. 
Department of Physical Education for Men, Professor 

Harold M. Gore, Head of Department. 
Department of Physical Education for Women, Mrs. 

C. S. Hicks, Physical Director for ^omen, Head 

of Department. 
Department of Athletics, Professor Curry- S. Hicks, 

Head of Department and also Head of the Division. 

Following consideration of this proposal, it 



VOTED ; To authorize the ^resident to carry out the 
reorganization as proposed, creating a new 
Division of Physical Education, with Pro- 
fessor Hicks as Head, and four Departments 
as described. 



733 



Reorganization 

Physical 

Education 



140 



TRUSTEE 

E.R.A. 

Projects - 
Women' s 
Athletic 
Field 



Honorary- 
Degrees 



Student 

Boarding 

Regulations 



Alumni 

R e c o minend a t i on 



THE MASSACHUSETTS AGRICULTURAL COLLEGE 

The President spoke of plans for E.R.A. pro- 
jects, one of which is the completion of the construction 
of the Women's Athletic Field which was begun as a C.W.A. 
project in 1934, In view of request of E.R.A. authority 
for specific approval by the Trustees for this project 
and upon the recommendation of the President, it was 

VOTED : To authorize the college administration to 
proceed with the project for completion of 
the Girls' Athletic Field on the west slope 
of the Campus. 

The President reported that the Cabinet had con 
sidered several recommendations of candidates for honor- 
ary degrees, but had no recommendations to make to the 
Trustees in the matter. The Cabinet has voted to appoint 
a special committee to study the qualifications of out- 
standing Alumni and others with a view to bringing 
recommendations to the Trustees next year. 

The President described certain readjustments 
necessary in view of the availability of additional dormi- 
tory space for men due to the construction of Thatcher 
Hall. Upon his recommendation, it was 

VOTED ; 'l'o revise the regulation concerning the 

boarding of students at the College Dining 
Hall so as to permit upper class students 
rooming in campus dormitories to board off- 
campus, but only in approved dining halls 
under the supervision of the Faculty Com- 
mittee on Student Housing and Sanitation. 

Report was received from the Associate Alumni 

making two recommendations: first, that the College 

grant the A.B. degree; and second, that changes be made 

in eligibility rules for student participation in 

athletics and academic activities. The recommendation 

regarding the A.B. degree was presented with the recom- 



• 



TRUSTEE 



• 



• 



THE MASSACHUSETTS AGRICULTURAL COLLEGE 

mendation from the Cabinet that no action he taken and 
this recommendation was accepted. 

As a result of thorough study by the Cabinet, 
certain modifications of eligibility rules were 
recommended to the Trustees, which, while not including 
all of the recommendations of the Associate Alumni, would 
seem to go a considerable distance in the direction of 
their r ecommendat ions . 

Changes recommended in eligibility rules are 
described as follows: 



a* 



That the present regulation which stipulates "No man 
who has obtained a varsity letter in another insti- 
tution shall be permitted to participate in inter- 
collegiate athletics in that sport" be repealed. It 
is felt that this rule is too drastic and that the 
one year transfer rule offers sufficient protection in 
this connection. Since this recommendation involves 
other colleges in the New England Intercollegiate Con- 
ference, it will be necessary to secure action by the 
Conference. 



741 



Eligibility 

Rules 

Chances 



b. 



c. 



That rule 2 of the College Eligibility Rules be modi- 
fied to read as follows: "No man (a) who has 
recorded in the office of the Dean six or more 
credit hours of work as conditioned or failed (unless 
he has by arrangement with the Dean substitute 
credits from a summer school), or (b) who having been 
continued on scholarship probation, is found to be 
below passing at any time, shall take part in any 
public game, contest, or entertainment given by any 
club association or team of students, or occupy the 
position of manager or assistant manager of the same, 
or editor or manager of any college publication." 
This modification removes the restriction of entrance 
conditions and slightly modifies other restrictions. 

I'hat rule 3 of the College Eligibility Rules be 
abolished. This removes the possibility of a student 
becoming ineligible as a result of Dean f s Saturday 
report. 



1 



742 



TRUSTEE 



' 



THE MASSACHUSETTS AGRICULTURAL COLLEGE 



# 



d. That the present rule 4 be listed as rule 5 and re- 
worded as follows: . A student who has been dropped 
from college or to a succeeding class because of 
scholarship, or who has withdrawn in order to avoid 
being dropped for said reason, is not eligible to 
take part in any of the activities enumerated in 
paragraph two of this rule until he has been in 
college one semester after the date of his return 
and has satisfied the conditions of eligibility set 
forth in paragraph two of this rule. The Dean, with 
the approval of the Scholarship Committee, may debar 
any student from participation at any time as an 
action of probation," 

It was 

VOTED: To adopt the recommend a 1 ' ion of the Presi- 
dent that changes in eligibility rules as 
described above be approved. 

The meeting adjourned at 4:35 P.M. 




?tL~1 t\-UUOLLi/ J 




Vice- 
President 



* 




Secretary 



» 



* 



• 




& 



SUGGESTED ORDER OK BUSINESS 
FOR CO! - I uT MEETING OF BOARD OF TRUSTEES 

OF 
MASSACHUSETTS STATE COLLEGE 

President's Office, 10: ,M«, June 10, 1935 



I. Call to order by His Excellency, Governor James M. 
rley, Presj t; or by Na1 del I. Bowditch, 
Vice-President. 



II. Recommendations from the Faculties oi the Colic 

and Gi te School ss to cand.- ; for degrees. 



ill. Recommendations from the President as to personnel 
t the College. 

IV. Stat of PV/A Projects. 

V. Unfinished and new business. 

1. Recommend •• tions from Division of Physical 
Education. 

2. Form >n of a Homestea ociation. 

5. Date of Budget Meeting in September. 

VI . Ad :\ ournment . 




w 



• 



* 



+ 



TRUSTEE 



• 



THE MASSACHUSETTS AGRICULTURAL COLLEGE 

MI L'ti- . o OF SEMI-ANNUAL MEET ING 0^ BQ^KD OF TRUSTEES 

Presidents Office, Amherst, June 10, 1955, 10:00 A.M. 

Vice-President Bowditeh presided. 

PRESEN T: Trustees Bowditeh, Buttrick, Gillett, 

itrnore, Frost, Russell, Griggs, 
Chandler, Malcolm, Mrs. Leach, Mrs. 
ilsonj President Baker, Treasurer Kenney 

The following is the call to meeting: 

Amherst, Mass. 
y 31, 19: z 5 

To the Trustees of the Massachusetts State College: 

In accordance with the provision of the By-Laws, 
the semi-annual meeting of the Board of Trustees of the 
Massachusetts State College is hereby called to convene 
at the President's Office at Amherst at 10:00 A.M., 
Monday June 10th. 

Other events of the Commencement Season have be 
described in previous correspondence and the President 
has invited your attendance at these events. 

e shall anticipate with pleasure y^i-tv presence on 
the Campus at Commencement. 

Yours respectfully, 
/s/ Robert D. Hawley 
Secretary 

The minutes of the preceding meeting were 
3 pr ov e d w i thout r e a d in g . 

Upon the recommendation of the Faculty of the 

College, it was 

VOTED: To confer the degree Bachelor of Science 

upon the following 189 members of the Class 
of 1955: 

Summa Cum Laude 

Robert West Abbott 

[agng Cum Laude 

Willard Harold Boynton 
Max Dub in 

Alfred Eastman Newton 
"William Arthur Scott 
Marion Es telle Smith 



743 



Call 



.iinutes 






TRUSTEE 



THE MASSACHUSETTS AGRICULTURAL COLLEGE 



Cum Laude 



Roland Frederick Becker 
Marie Eleanor Currier 
Robert Harlow Herman son 
Robert Franklin Lib bey 
Silas Little, Jr. 
Hermann George Patt 
Walter Stepat 
John Peter Veerlin? 



Rite 



Robert John Allen, Jr. 
Frederick Newcomb Andrews 
David Lewis Arenberg 
Stuart Aborn Arnold 
Madelyn Gertrude Ashley 

th Anna Avery 
John Lewis Bailey 
Jean Sutherland Baker. 
Iona Elizabeth Barr 
Dorothy Eleanor Bartlett 
Helen Elnora Bartlett 
Helen Elizabeth Beebe 
Vernon Adam Veith Bell 
Anna Judyth Bernstein 
Laura Bingham 
James William Blackburn 
Roger Tait Blackburn 
Lamont Vincent Blake 
William Austin Bower 
George Bozian 

Iter Edward Br ay den 
Mary Teresa Brennan 
Richard Mill s_Br own 

Hi am Clay Brown 
Lawrence Mason Bullard 
Albert Franklin Burgess, 
Kenneth Bangs Cahoon 
Franc is I Leo Car on 
Charlotte Belcher Casey 
John Alden Caswell 
Curtis Mason Clark 
Lester Wilbur Clark 
Philip Hartshorn Clark 

i.ma Hough Col son 
George Steadman Congdon 
Ellen Ro^e Country 
Helen Margaret Connolly 
John Joseph Consolati 



Jr. 



Dorothy Flora Cook 
Frederick Leo Corcoran 
Hugh Joseph Corcoran 
Alfred Elmer Cox, 3rd 
Chester Ellsworth Cross 
Roderick Wells Gumming 
Charles Huward Daniels 
Myron Carl Davis 
William Mill or d Davis 
Amy Dear den 
Raymond DiMarzio 
Catherine Elizabeth Dimock 
Howard Ralph Dobbie 
Bernice Jo-Ann Dolan 
Bernard Joseph Doyle 
Alice Isabel Dwight 
Joseph Aaron Dworman 
John"Crosb«- Eldridge 
Charles Francis Elliott 
Henry David Epstein 
Raymond Knightly Evans 
Florence Chess on Fay 
Abraham Elliot Feinberg 
Ernest Br ay ton Fisher, Jr. 
Cornelia Frances Foley 
Daniel Joseph Foley 
Charles Bostwick Fowler 
Christine Louise Frey 
Lois Florence Friedrich 
James Edward Gavagan 
Minnie Gendler 
Edward Harry Genest, Jr. 
Clayton Herman George 
Vincent Cooper Gilbert 
Arthur Gold 
Barnett Louis Golub 
Grace Mae Goulart 
Irene Edna Govoni 






TRUSTEE 



THE MASSACHUSETTS AGRICULTURAL COLLEGE 



Ralthp Hawthorne Grander 
Julian Philip Griffin 
Edward Frederick Guenard, Jr 
Evelyn Alice Gunn 
Victor Stanley Guzowski 
Eben Theodore Hall 
Elizabeth Katherine Harringt 
Marion Threasa Harris 
George Albert Hartwell 
Albert Bancroft Hovey 
Mildred Martina Hovey 
Richard William Hubbard 
Robert Packard Hunter 
Charles Wooding Hutchinson 
Zigmund John Jackimczyk 
Ernest Anthony Jaworski 
Walter Oscar Johnson 
William Joseph Jordan, Jr. 
Joseph Francis Keil 
Eloise Beers Kellogg 
Leslie Collis Kimball 
Mary Emma Kingston 
Robert Magoon Koch 
Violet Sylvia Koskela 
Albert Broudy Landis 
Theodore Moreau Leary 
Roger Kenison Leavitt 
Louis Herbert Lebeshevsky 
Arthur Sidney Levine 
Ruth Lvciia Lindouist 

V J- 

Elizabeth Loring 
Bertram Lubin 

Everett Spencer Mac Quest! on 
Ruth Annette Markley 
Edward Danville Masters 
John Henry McKelligott 
Howard Bryne Michel son 
Joseph Miller 
Robert Dawson Mitchell 
Walter Stanley Mozden 
William Paul Mulhall 
William Richard Muller 
Marguerite Anne Murphy 
Robert Vincent Murray 
Edward Bedre Massif 
Stanley Stowell Newcomb 
Ralph Eaton Morris 
Julius Novick 
Allan John O'Brien 
Edward Lawrence Packard 



Leonard Ward Parker 
George Raymond Pease 

• Howard Ed son Pease 

Ruth Elizabeth Pelissier 
Elizabeth Cushman Perry 
Leo Pollin 

on Edward LeRoy Prentiss 
Shirley Dorothy Putnam 
Albert Bradbury Ramsdell,Jr 
Henry Frank Ri semen 
Philip Robinson 
Sylvia Lillian Rod 
Harriet Ann Roper 
Sidney Arthur Salamoff 
Janet Christie Sargent 
Ruth Wentworth Sargent 
Thomas Joseph Savaria 
Paul Webster Schaffner 
William Valentine Schlaefer 
Bernice Giduz Schubert 
Willard Henry Senecal 
Maurice Shapiro 
Hyman Sharff 

Rosamond Myrtle Shattuck 
Glenn Frederick Shaw 
John Raymond Siira 
Charlotte Fogwell Sleep 
Samuel Peaslee Snow 
Kenneth Austin Steadman 
Nelson Pierce Stevens 
Donald Mitchell Stewart 
Philip Carlton Stone 
James Ellsworth Sumner 
Harold Samuel Tannenbaum 
Eleanor Charlotte Thatcher 
Carrol Edwin Thayer 
Edna Thornton 
Corada Sara Tinti 
Wilbur Greene Tirrell 
Joseph John Tosches 
Emil John Tramposch 
James Jackson Valentine 
Merrill Louis Welcker, Jr. 
Joseph Adolphus Whitney 
Benjamin Joseph Wihry 
Louis Isaac Winokur 
Paul Owen Wood 
Robert Holman Wood 
Dante Zucker 



745 




746 



TRUSTEE 



B.V.A. Degree 



B.L.A. Degree 



M.S. Degree 



..D. Degree 



A Projects 



THE MASSACHUSETTS AGRICULTURAL COLLEGE 

Upon the recommendation of the Faculty of the 
College, it was 

VOTED: To confer the degree Bachelor of Vocational 
Agriculture upon Sulo John Tani of the 
Class of 1935'. 

Upon the recommendation of the Faculty of the 

College, it was 

VOTED : To confer the degree Bachelor of Landscape 
Architecture upon Homer S. Fisher. 

Upon the recommendation of the Faculty of the 

Graduate School, it was 

VOTED : To confer the degree Master of Science upon 
the following candidates: 



Carr'olle E. Anderson 
Elmer E. Barber 
Evelyn A. Beaman 
William E. Bosworth 
William S. Conway 
Eunice M. Doerpholz 
J. Elizabeth Donley 
William B. Esselen 
William J. Foley 
Claude B. Germany 
Ashley B. Gurney 
John R. Hanson 
J. Franklin Hunt 
Benjamin Isgur 



Vernet S. Keller 
Evelyn D. Kimball 
Francis M. Lohan 
Walter ... Maclinn 
Charles Minarik 
Charles E. Murphy 
Thomas Onsdorf f 
Ruth L. Parker 
Russell L. Snow 
Alexander X. Sokol 
Leora J. Spaulding 
Adam V. Syrocki 
Marion R. Taylor 
Vernon K. Watson 



Upon the recommendation of the Faculty of the 

Graduate School, it was 

VOTED : To confer the degree Doctor of Philosophy 
upon the following: candidates: 



John k. Clague 
Frc.nc is P. Griffiths 
William B. Hamilton 



Paul D. I sham 
Major F. Spaulding 
Wallace W. Stuart 



President Baker reported progress concerning the 
PV.A projects. That for improvement of steam lines and 
electrical equipment has been completed. The dormitory 
project has also been completed and approved. It has 



f>- 







TRUSTEE 





747 



THE MASSACHUSETTS AGRICULTURAL COLLEGE 

been necessary to extend the time for completion of the 
Library due to delays in furnishing materials so that this 
building will probably not be completed and furnished 
until August fifteenth. 

Recently a request was received from the Com- 
mission on Administration and Finance that the College 
submit a list of projects for consideration in connection 
with the building program of the State now being formu- 
lated. In reply, the College submitted a list of fourteer. 
projects, for the first two of which tentative plans and 
specifications were also submitted, a description of 
this list, summarized as follows, was handed to each mem- 
ber of the Board present: 



1. Reconstruction of Old Library Building 

2. Women 1 s Building 
5. Physics Laboratory 

4. Auditorium and Classroom Building 

5. Headquarters Building for Campus Services 

and Central Garage 

6. Administration Building 

7. Women 1 s Dormitory 

8. Vegetable Gardening Classroom and Storage 

Building 

9. Macadam Highway Extension of Existing Ways 

10. Riding Hall and Target Range for ROTC Unit 

11. Mathematics and Engineering Building 

12. YJater Mains for Fire Protection 

(Completion of Project) 

13. Gravel Road 

14. General Classroom Building 

Following discussion, it was 



| 55,000 
250,000 
150,000 
400,000 

50,000 
200,000 
200,000 

18,000 

S5,000 

40,000 

175,000 

20,000 

19,000 

180,000 



Building 
Program 



VOTED : To confirm the action of the President in 

submitting the above list of projects to the 
Commission on Administration and Finance and 
to authorize the President to file with the 
Commission preliminary plans and specifica- 
tions as these may be called for. 



748 



TRUSTEE 



Intercollegiate 

Athletic 
Regulations 



Homeste 
sociation 



THE MASSACHUSETTS AGRICULTURAL COLLEGE 

The President also reported that a request has 
just been received from the Governor asking the College 
to prepare a twenty-five year building program for con- 
sideration in connection with the preparation of a long 
term building program for the State. There was discussion 
of the many factors to be considered in connection "with 
the preparation of such a program, following which, it 
wa s 

VOTED: To authorize the President to have prepared 
a twenty-five year building program for 
submission to Trustees for approval. 

Upon the recommendation of the Joint Committee 

on Intercollegiate Athletics, it was 




VOTED : To change paragraph four and paragraph seven 
of the regulations governing intercollegiate 
athletics as adopted by the Board of Trustees 
on June 17, 1913; these changes described as 
follows: Paragraph four to read ,f The Joint 
Committee shall be composed of the following 
members: the student managers of inter- 
collegiate teams, two members of the Faculty 
appointed by the President of the College, 
three Alumni of the College, the Physical 
Director, and the President of the College 
ex-officio. n Paragraph seven to read "Presi- 
dent of the Joint Committee, the Physical 
Director, the Secretary, and the student 
manager of sport in Question shall constitute 
an executive committee on matters pertaining 
to that sport." 

Pre sin eat Baker presented in writing a proposed 

Constitution for the formation of a Homestead Association 

<pomposed of students, and others interested in Home 

Economics and in the maintenance of the Home Economics 

practice house. Following discussion in which it was 

suggested that the executive committee be composed of five 

members and that provision be made for amendments to the 





TRUSTEE 



t 



♦ 



749 



THE MASSACHUSETTS AGRICULTURAL COLLEGE 

constitution, it was 

VOTED ; To approve the formation of a Homestead 
Association as proposed. 

It wa s 

VOTKD ; To authorize the President of the College 
and the Vice-President of the Board to fix 
the date of the annual budget meeting in 
September and to authorize a call for that 
meeting together with snca committee meet- 
ings as may be necessarv. 

Following the consumption of pev-sonnel matters, 

and upon the recommendation of the President, it was 

VOTED: To accept the resignatidn of Miss Lorian P. 
Jefferson, Assistant Research Professor of 
Agricultural Economics, to be effective 
July 31, 1955. 

The President presented the following statement 

re°;ardin,p; the recent dath of Mr. Lowrv: 



"Wayne Judson Lowry, Instructor in Horticulture, met 
his death in an automobile accident May 20. Mr. Lowry 
was a graduate of Michigan State College. He came to our 
College first as a Graduate Assistant and received our 
degree Master of Science in 1952, being then appointed to 
the staff. He was a man of sturdy character, reliable 
and trustworthy in all particulars, deeply in love with 
his work and indefatigable in it. He was unusually happy 
and successful in his contacts with students, being 
regarded by them as a staunch friend and leader. He was 

•ally popular with his fellow workers, and will' be sad- 
ly missed from our Campi ." 

Following the President's statement, the 

following action was taken: 

vrnereas Mr. Lowry ? s death is keenly felt as a 
distinct loss to the College, be it hereby RESOLVED that 
the above statement be inscribed upon the official 
records of the Board of Trustees and a copy sent to his 
rents. 



te of 
Budget 
Meeting 



.S3 



Jefferson' s 
tirement 



Mr . Lowry ! s 
Death 



750 



TRUSTEE 



Sick Leave - 
Dr. Boyd, 
Dr.. Foley 



Leaves _- 
Miss Gerard, 
. [or ley, 

Mr. Hack 



rtments, 

.senmenger, 

. De Bilva 



Br. Beaumont' s 
1 e 



was 



THE MASSACHUSETTS AGRICULTURAL COLLEGE 



Upon the recommendation of the President, it 



VOTED : To authorize sick leave not to exceed six 
months to Or an C. Boyd, Extension Plant 
Pathologist, whose absence on account of 
illness began March 15, 1935, and for Dr. 
Mary J. Foley, Instructor in Agricultural 
Economics, whose leave on account of illness 
began December 12, 1934. 

It was 



VOTED: To authorize leave of absence for profession- 
al improvement for Miss Grace B. Gerard, Ex- 
tension Specialist in Home Economics, for a 
period of six weeks this summer in addition 
to regular vacation; for Mrs. Ruth C. Morley^ 
Extension Specialist in Child Development, 
for two weeks this summer in addition to 
regular vacation; and f or j Merrill J. Hack, 
Assistant Professor of Dairying, from 
March %5, 1955, to June 10, 1935. 

Upon the recommendation of the President, it 



was 



VOTED : To approve reappointment for one year for 
Dr. Walter S. Ei senmenger, Research Pro- 
fessor of Agronomy, and for Dr.. Harry R. 
DeSilva, Professor of Psychology. 

President Baker again brought up the case of Dr. 

Beaumont because of his recent approaches to members of 

the Board of Trustees, and to others. Following, dis- 

sion, it was 

VOTED : That Pro sor Beaumont be given a hearing 
before the Board of Trustees immediately. 

Professor Beaumont appeared before the Board 
at 11:50 A. 

At this point His Excellency, Governor James M. 
Cnrley, came into the meeting. Following introductions, 
he requested that the business proceed in normal manner. 



• 



• 



• 



• 



TRUSTEE 



♦ 



THE MASSACHUSETTS AGRICULTURAL COLLEGE 

Professor Beaumont then presented his case to 
the Board of Trustee s, concluding his statement at 
12:15 P.M. After Professor Beaumont had left the meet- 
ing, there was discussion of the matter and it was ex- 
plained in more detail to His Excellency who s ;sted 
that Professor Beaumont be given an opportunity to 
resign. Following discussion, it was unanimously 

VOTED ; That the Board does not i to change the 
decision already made in the case of Dr. 
Beaumont. 

The meeting adjourned at 12:50 P.] . 



v_ 




i {.au^LJL^f 




^Vlce- 
^Pipesiclent 




'Secretary 



751 



# 



752 



TRUSTEE 



- - 



- 

or _ tion 
dcs 



THE MASSACHUSETTS AGRICULTURAL COLLEGE 

""■"• OF MEETINB OF EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE _T "■■.:/ "'"D 

OF 

Boston City Club, Boston, Mass., July 18, 1 . 12:30 P.M 

Trustee Bov/ditch presided. 

PP_"___ Trustees Be ten, Bacon, i e, 

Frost; President Baker, Tre? er Ker 

In accordance Tom Governor 

that the College submit • ty-five ld- 

ing jro^ram, the administration has studi -lem 

and a progr as submitted to the Executive C ee 

for consideration. Thj _ am is composed of twenty- 

i ' " Lildi! - and total in cost .5,000. 

fter cc of the pro. , it was 

VOTED : Tc rove its su ission tc t Dvernor 

in reply to his re t. 

e tr ' ' personnel as the re?"> J " of 

of the work in Economic- e reported 

the Trustees anc It as 

D: of the pro- 

fessional and clerical staff in Economics. 

Pre e consider ie 

Co ' to t " 'cise ioc t >n of en f s 

loc< in general at the me tin of 

11 Board 11 

and Fern« c ce fro reet 

at time. It seemed to be the 

.on of the Co tee 1 i 1 be 

located in line wi1 all and Fern; Sail. 






f 



TRUSTEE 



THE MASSACHUSETTS AGRICULTURAL COLLEGE 



Preliminary p] • • t le bulletin ■ resented 

seemed to meet w: the approv. 1 of the Committee, 

r <nr ] the recommendation of the Presi , it 

I s 

VOTED : To authorize the employment of Mr. L. \ . 

Ro as architect for the Women's Building, 
when and if funds for this structure becc 
available. 

President Baker reported the status of the 

Bankhead- Jones Bill and presented a list of personnel 

fcfc* employment, when and if funds become available from 

the Federal Government under the provisions of tnis Bi] ] . 

It w« 

VOTED; To authorise the President to dnt- 
ments to the st s indicated in the 
list submitted ashen md if funds become 
available under the E ] h -Jones Bill. 

Plans for the reconstruction of the old Library 

were pre sen and seemed to meet with the approval of 

Le Trustees. It was 

VOTED : To authorize the President to appoint Mr. 
C. F. Goodwin as architect for this build- 
ing when and if funds become rai] ble for 
its reconstruction. 

The President reported the status of the 

various special appropriation items. It was 

To authorize the President t Lo; r. 
L. v.. Ross as architect for the completion 
of the Infirmary i ■ lary 

not to exceed $400. 

PI n supervision for the construction 

the macadam hi are to be in the hands of the State 

Department of Public Works. Plans and the 



753 



dtect, 

- n ! s 
Buili 



[- 
Jones I . 



Architect, 
Old Libr£ . 

he con struct ion 



Architect, 
Infi ,y 
Buildii 



754 



TRUSTEE 



Hi* hway Re- 
construction 



it of 

Jour-- 3m 
3n 



THE MASSACHUSETTS AGRICULTURAL COLLEGE 



ex+ on of the w t ins are to be in the hands of 
ie State Department o iblic Health. -construction 
of the Drill Hall floor as provided for by special 

vn is to undertaken under contract which 
Lll b pervised b- e College, 

fifith funi "^ovided for extension of the ser- 
vice of the Waltham Field Stati r. for nurserymen, it is 
plar ~" to build *v addition to the build: cost 
of pproxim t and to employ two s of the 
prof- i ] staff. 

The President reported on indications as to 
propriations for the Co~\;^-c> ± n the Supplementary 

— — — _ V 

Bu< 

The need for the crept ion of a Dep« t of 
Journalism in the CoV whir ill supervise all the 
editorial and publicity work of the institution \ pre- 
sented by the Pre ent and he ex ] i ned t t it is his 
hope that funds may become available through the Bankhead 

Bill ^o provide for the appointment of a Professor 
and Head of a I trnent of Journalism, which would 
possible this reo lization. t from the Committee 
of the Faculty unde: airmanship of Director Munson, 

ted, reco icl action a- ollowing 

tion the Committee, i1 3 . 

D: 'ize roceed 

the organization of a Department 

f funds become 
lable. 



♦ 



THE MASSACHUSETTS AGRICULTURAL COLLEGE 



The President explained the need for more 

effective organization in Vegetable Gardening: at the 

College and upon his recomrv on, it was 

VOThiD; To approve the promote of Assistant 

Professor Snyder to be Professor and Head 
of the Department of Vegetable Gardening. 

The President presented a memorandum from Pro- 
fessor Rice, Head of the Division of Agriculture, 
recommending cert- in changes in livestock plans for the 
College Farm as a measure of economy and efficiency. 
This proposal was to eliminate gradually the Shorthorn 
breed of cattle and the Berkshire swine in order that 
more attention and more fundi ight be available for im- 
provement of the other breeds. It was 

VQTF.D : To approve the recommendation of 'Pro ^r 
Rice and to authorize the discontinuance 
of theBe two breeds in such a m r as 
the President and Professor Rice may con- 
sider wise. 

The President reported progress on the ERA pro- 
jects being- carried on at the College j one for the com- 
pletion of tvip Women 1 s Athletic Field and the other for 
the pruning of shade trees on the C _ s. The latter 
project has been carried through largely due to the 
efforts of Trustee Frost and Mr. Bartlett, Alumnus of the 
Collet. One of Mr. Frost's expert foremen is in charge 
of the project during the month of July, his services be- 
ing flemished by Mr. Frost, and onp of Mr. Bartlett f s 
foremen is to take charge of the project during August 
on the same b^sis. 0pon motion by Mr. Whitmore, it was 



755 



Promotion of 

Pro .or 
Snyder 



Elimination 
of two live- 
stock breeds. 



Projects 



75 1 



TRUSTEE 



Home Economics 

: sociation 
Constitution 



Housing 
Federal 
Fore sty 
loyees 



i^vices to 
Theta Chi 

House 



THE MASSACHUSETTS AGRICULTURAL COLLEGE 

VPT.^D ; To record the appreciation of the Trustees 
for this splendid service of Mr. Frost 
nd Mr. Bartlett. 

The President presented a revised constitution 

for the Home Economics Homestead Association, and it was 

VQT'p.p : To approve the constitution and to 
authorize the organization of such 
an Association as it implies. 

The President explained the growing need for 
adequate room for Federal Forestry people housed at the 
College and explained that arrangements have been made 
whereby the upper floor of the Mathematics Building might 
be available for their use. The Federal authorities 
have agreed to pay for the necessary improvements, pro- 
vided some arrangements can be made for a lease which 
will be necessary in case of their Investment of funds in 
the improvement of tl -ty. After further explana- 
tion and consideraton of the er, it was 

VOTED : To authorize the President to enter into 

such arrangements with the Federal Depart- 
ment as may appear wise. 

Treasurer Kenney presented the request of the 
Theta Chi Fraternity to purchase steam and electric ser- 
vice from the College in the ne? r house which they expect 
to build on Pleasant Street south of the Phi Sigma Kappa 
House. There was a discussion of the matter of cost of 
extending the college lines to the building and the 
general question of policy in such matters. It was 

VOTED : To authorize Trustee Bowditeh, President 
Baker, and Treasurer Kenney to make 
decision and arrangement in this case 
as seemed to them wise. 



• 



* 






% 



TRUSTEE 



• 



THE MASSACHUSETTS AGRICULTURAL COLLEGE 



Tii 



1'he President reported that due to the fact 
that costs for renovation of South College as contemplated 
to house administrative offices appear to be so high, it 
has been decided to postpone such changes for a year and 
to request an appropriation in the budget of the Coll€ 
for this purpose next year. 

The meeting adjourned at 5:00 P.M. 



6^ / h^^OyL^U/ J? /A^VW2^Z/ Pr 



Vice- 
President 




„ 



I'M,,*/. 




Secretarv 



757 



South College 

j cons true tier. 



758 



TRUSTEE 



Minutes 
ADproved 



Snyder 
Promoted 



Executive 
Committee 
;,;inutes 
oroved 



Staff 
Changes 
rip proved 



THE MASSACHUSETTS AGRICULTURAL COLLEGE 



MINUTES OF MEETING OF BOARD OF TRUSTEES 

State House, Boston, Mass., 9:45 A.M., September 26,1955 

Chairman, Trustee Bowditch 

PRESENT: Trustees Bowditch, Frost, Dewey, Griggs, 
Malcolm, Mrs. Wilson, Russell, Gillett, 
Buttrick, Whitmore, President Baker, also 
Treasurer Senney. 

The minutes of the preceding meeting were 
approved without reading. 

The minutes of the meeting of the Executive 

Committee, held in Boston on July 18, 1955, were read by 

the Secretary. Upon the recommendation of the President, 

it was 

VOTED : To amend the action taken by the Executive 
Committee with regard to the promotion of 
Assistant Professor Snyder "and promote him 
to be Professor and Head of the Department 
of Vegetable Gardening. 

Following discussion of the report of the meet- 
ing of the Executive Committee, it was 

VOTED : To approve the actions of the Executive 

Committee taken at its meeting on July 18 
with the exception of its vote authorizing 
the President to proceed with the organiza- 
tion of a Department of Journalism when and 
if funds become available. 

The report of the Committee on Faculty and 
Program of Study included recommendations for the appro- 
val of resignations, leaves of absence and appointments. 
It was 

VOTED : To approve the resignations, leaves of 
absence and appointments as recommended 
by the Committee. 



• 



^ 



• 



TRUSTEE 



759 



THE MASSACHUSETTS AGRICULTURAL COLLEGE 

Resignation 
Mary J. Foley, Instructor in Agricultural Economics, 
July 31, 1955. 

Leave of Absence 
Ronald L. Highell, assistant Research Professor of Farm 
Management, 1 year from October 1, 1935, without pay. 

New Appointments 

William B. Becker, Entomologist, Elm Tree Disease Control, 
July 1, 1935, $1,980. Special Supplementary appropria- 
tion. 

Mrs. Mary L. Broughton, Dormitory Matron, July 1, 1935, 
$1,320 and room. 

J. W. Burke, Extension Editor, October 1, 1935, $2,520. 

Theodore C. Caldwell, Assistant Professor of History and 
Sociology, September 1, 1935, $2,220. 

Mrs. Sara M. Coolidge, Assistant Professor of Home 
Economics, September 1, 1935, #2,220. 

Charles R. Creek, Research Assistant in Farm Management, 
September 1, 1935, $1,620. 

James W. Dayton, Extension Specialist in Vegetable Garden- 
ing, October 16, 1935, $3,600. 

Constant ine J. Gilgut, Technical Assistant, Waltham 
Field Station, August 1, 1955, $1,620. 

Olive M. Hoefle, Technical Assistant, Seed Control, Sep- 
tember, 1, 1935, $1,620. 

Russell C. Larcom, Instructor in Economics, September 1, 
1935, $1,620. 

Malcolm A. McKenzie, Pathologist, Elm Tree Disease Con- 
trol, July 1, 1935, $3,000. Special Supplementary 
Appropriation. 

Walter M. Miller, Assistant Professor of Mathematics, 
September 1, 1935, $2,220. 

Rudolph 0. Mono smith, Instructor in Horticulture, Septem- 
ber,!, 1935, $1,620. 

Richard T. Muller, Assistant Research Professor of 
Nursery Culture, August 1, 1935, $2,400. 

William H. Ross, Instructor in Physics, September 1, 1935, 
$1,620. 

Frank R. Shaw, Instructor in Entomology and Beekeeping, 
September 1, 1955, $1,740. 

Frank B. Stratton, Instructor in Music, September 1, 1955, 
$1,620. 

Bankhead - Jones Funds 

Beatrice Billings, Assistant Extension Specialist in 
Home Economics, October 1, 1935, $2,400. 

Philip L. Gamble, Assistant Professor of Economics, 
September 16, 1935, $2,220. 

Sidney W. Kauffman, Instructor in Physical Education, 
October 1, 1935, $1,620. 

Claude C. Neet, Instructor in Education, September 20, 
1935, $1,620. 

Raymond F. Pelissier, Extension Instructor in Farm 
Management, September 1, 1935, $1,620. 



760 



TRUSTEE 



Instruction 
Budget 



Short Course 
Budget 



extension 
Budget 



Experiment 
Station 

Budget 



Control 
Service 
Budget 



Special 
Appropriations 



THE MASSACHUSETTS AGRICULTURAL COLLEGE 

Also upon the recommendation of the Committee 

on Faculty and Program of Study, it was 

VOTED : To approve the budget for Instruction for 
1936 totaling $326,925 of which $280,285 
is to be derived from State appropriations 
and $46,640 from Federal appropriations. 

Upon the recommendation of the Committee on 

Faculty and Program of Study, it was 

VOTED ; To adopt a budget for Short Courses 
totaling |65,410, 

Upon the recommendation of the Committee on 

Extension Service, it was 

VOTED ; To adopt the budget totaling #173,605 of 

which $108,143 is to be derived from State 
appropriations and $65,462 from Federal 
appropriations . 

Upon the recommendation of the Committee on 

Experiment Station, it was 

VOTED ; To adopt the budget totaling $222,085 of 
which $132,085 is to be derived from 
State appropriations and $90,000 from 
Federal appropriations. 

Also upon the recommendation of the Committee 

on Experiment Station, it was 

VOTED : To adopt the budget for Control Services 
totaling |72,885 and including an item of 
$9,800 for Dairy Cattle Certification. 

The Committee on Buildings and Grounds pre- 
sented its recommendation regarding items for special 
appropriations to be included in the budget for 1936. 
These recommendations included four items under the 
heading New Buildings and Major Improvements as follows: 



• 



m 



*> 



• 



TRUSTEE 



* 



• 



THE MASSACHUSETTS AGRICULTURAL COLLEGE 



1« Women *s Building 

2. Physics Laboratory 

3. Reconstruction of South College 

4. Purchase of land 

a. Tuxbury Land — 50 acres $7,000 

b. Dickinson Farm - 60 

acres and buildings 12,000 

c. Powers Land - J acre and 

buildings 2,500 

d. Avery Land — 6 acres 5,000 

e. Stone Land — 1 acre and 

buildings 10,000 

f . Hays Land — 1 acre and 

buildings 4,000 

Total 
Total for group 



$250,000 

150,000 

40,000 



40,500 
§480,500 



Under the- heading Needed Improvements and Repairs 



Xm Completion of Biology Laboratory 
Hatch Barn 

2. Rebuild laboratory tables, 

Bacteriology 

3. Extension of Feed Control 

Research 

4. Additional Bull Pens 

5. Master Clock System 

6. Extending electric system to 

Harlow Farm 

7. Incinerator 

8. Improvement of telephone system 

9. Fire protection 

10. Reconstruction of Campus roads 

11. Aid to students 

12. Emergency Fund 

Total for Group 
Grand total 

It was 



& 



$9,500 



3,000 

5,000 
3,000 
2,400 

2,000 

3,500 

10,000 

15,000 

16,000 

5,000 

2,500 



76,900 
;557,400 



VOTED ; To adopt the budget for special items 
as recommended by the Committee on 
Buildings and Grounds, 

President Baker explained that due to the lack 

of a quorum it had not been possible to have the Finance 

Committee of the Board consider the budget as a whole as 

has been the customary procedure. As a result, the full 

Board has been asked to give more detailed consideration 

to the budget as proposed. After consideration of the 



761 



Institutional 
Budget 



762 



Authority to 
Sign vouchers 



Tennis courts 
and roads 
projects 



THE MASSACHUSETTS AGRICULTURAL COLLEGE 



trustee whole budget for the College for 1956 as amended, it was 

VOTED ; To approve the budget for Maintenance 
for 1936 totaling for the Institution 
$1,517,985 of which $1,115,883 is to be 
derived from State appropriations and 
$202,102 from Federal appropriations. 



The President called attention to Chapter 288 
of the Acts of 1935 which provides for the approval of 
accounts at the College as follows: M A11 accounts for 
Maintenance and for Expenditures under Special appropria- 
tions shall be approved by the Trustees or, if the 
Trustees shall so vote, by the Vice-President or some 
other officer of the Board of Trustees, or another 
Trustee appointive or ex officio designated by the Vice- 
President and shall be filed with the Comptroller, TI 

Upon the recommendation of the President, it 

was 

VOTED ; To designate the President of the College 
or the Secretary of the Board of Trustees 
as Officers to sign schedules under the 
provisions of this Act, 

The President reported concerning the progress 

of Campus projects under the new W.P.A. Organization and 

upon his recommendation, it was 

VOTED ; To approve the Organization of Projects 
for Road Construction and tennis courts 
as described. 

The meeting adjourned at 11:55 A.M. 
fr/ fCuA U*JL UJ J /r^Tryu^ President 




&/W* 



(? ^/^/ Secretary 




• 



<• 



<• 



I 



• 



TRUSTEE 



* 



» 



THE MASSACHUSETTS AGRICULTURAL COLLEGE 

MINUTES OF MEETING OF GROUP OF TRUSTEES CALLED TO MEET 

WITH THE EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE OF THE BOARD 

City Club, Boston, Monday, December 23, 1955, 1 P.M. 

, PRESENT ; Trustees Bowditch, Russell, Frost, 
Buttrick, Dewey, Griggs, Baker. 

Campaign for the A.B. Degree at the College 

The President made brief statement as to the 
campaign that is being carried on at the College by 
students and others which it is hoped will result in 
action by the Board of Trustees offering the A.B. degree 
by the College. The President called attention to the 
fact that the Board of Trustees of the College are final 
authority for degree to be granted, whether in course or 
honorary; further, that the degree of B.S. has been 
granted by the College since its establishment and that 
the College is essentially a scientific and technical 
college. 

The President pointed out, further, that while 
he is not opposed to the granting of the A.B. degree by 
the College, and assumes that it will be granted eventu- 
ally, yet he is not ready at this time to make recommenda- 
tions as to the granting of the degree to the Board of 
Trustees for three principal reasons. 

1. The reputation of the College has been built 
through the years around the B.S. degree and 
that the work at the College is largely of a 
scientific and technical nature for which the 
B.S. is the logical degree. 



763 



A. B. Degree 






764 



TRUSTEE 



Cow Test 
Trust Funds 



THE MASSACHUSETTS AGRICULTURAL COLLEGE 

2. That the College is not ready at this time to 
give work leading to an A.B. degree of the same 
high standards as that which is given for the 
B.S. degree. As it has taken years to build 
the College in its reputation for the B.S. 
degree work, the granting of the A.B. degree at 
this time would weaken the B.S. degree work, 
particularly if funds were not forthcoming to 
add materially to staff and facilities. 

3. That the College at the present time has a host 
of friends through the State and, further, that 
the groups in the State that have helped the 
College most through the years are groups having 
to do with agriculture. It would be unfortunate 
to antagonize these groups, particularly in 
these times. 

The President asked the Trustees present to 
give consideration to the matter of the granting of an 
A.B. degree, particularly as it may be necessary to put 
the question officially before the Board at its annual 
meeting in January. 

Use of Trust Funds Accumulated through the past 20 Years 
under Cow Testing Program Carried on at the College. 

For approximately twenty years the College has 
carried on a separate activity under the general direc- 
tion of the Agricultural Experiment Station for the pur- 
pose of testing dairy cattle for certification. The 
Trustees, through the years, have felt that this should 
be carried as a separate activity and that the small 
fund accumulating through the years should be handled as 
a Trust Fund. At the Budget Meeting of the Trustees held 
in Boston on September 26, 1935, attention was called to 
this Fund and a recommendation was made by the President 
to transfer the activity to State appropriation. The 



f 



e 



• 



TRUSTEE 



♦ 



THE MASSACHUSETTS AGRICULTURAL COLLEGE 

Trustees voted to put an item into the budget for this 
year under the general heading of "Control Services" 
which would provide for the carrying of the work under 
State Funds. In the past twenty years there has 
accumulated a small annual balance in this Trust Fund 
until today the balance in this Trust Fund is $2,373.78. 
As it seems fitting and proper that this balance should 
be spent for the benefit of the Dairy Industry of the 
State, it was recommended by the President that the 
present balance, beyond a small reserve of $300.00, 
which is to be held for the carrying on of the work 
until State appropriation is available, be expended for 
the reorganization and improvement of the refrigerating 
system in the Dairy Building at the College. It was 
moved by Mr. Frost, seconded by Mr. Russell, that the 
President be authorized to proceed with the expenditure 
of the present balance in the Cow Testing Trust Fund, 
with the exception of $500.00 to be kept as a reserve, 
for the reorganization and improvement of the refrigera- 
ting system in the Dairy Building & the College. 
Motion was passed unanimously. 
Athletic Trust Funds Bookkeeping and the Bala ncing of 



Department with Records in the Trea surers Office . 

Attention was called to a procedure which was 
established by the Board of Trustees in 1913 for the hand- 
ling of Athletic Trust Funds at the College. This pro- 
cedure placed grea"t trust in the hands of Professor Hicks, 






Athletic 

Trust 

Funds 



THE MASSACHUSETTS AGRICULTURAL COLLEGE 



TRUSTEE ID. 



charge of the Physical Education Department, and this 

trust has been met with great fidelity by Professor 

Hicks. 1'hrough the years bookkeeping records for 

Athletic Trust Funds have been maintained both in the 

Physical Education Department and the Treasurer T s Office. 
Audit of the Athletic Trust Funds during the past year 

showed that there has been a slight difference in 
balances between the records of the Physical Educa- 
tion Department and the Treasurers Office, and it has 
been impossible for auditors or for the Department and 

the Treasurer ! s Office to find reason for this 
discrepancy. During the past months request was made by 

the College to the Office of the State Comptroller to 
have a representative visit the Physical Education Depart- 
ment to suggest bookkeeping procedure. A representa- 
tive of the Comptroller* s Office visited the Department 

and went over the situation thoroughly with Professor 
Hicks. It was the recommendation of this representa- 
tive that the slight difference in balance should be 
cleared up by authorization of the Board of Trustees to 

the Treasurer of the College to fix as the balance to be 

used the balance shown on the books of the Treasurer* s 

Office as of November 20, 1925. Because of unnecessary 

duplication in bookkeeping involving expenditures which 

can ill be afforded at this time, Professor Hicks has 

been pressing for a transfer of all bookkeeping from the 

Division of Physical Education to the Treasurer's 
office. There seems to be a good deal of duplication of 

boQkkeeping as between the various departments of the 



r 



i* 



e 






• 



TRUSTEE 



THE MASSACHUSETTS AGRICULTURAL COLLEGE 

College and the Treasurer* s Office and that it would be 
economy for the College and the State to have all book- 
keeping done in the Treasurer's Office. 

In view of the explanation made, it was 
recommended by the President that the balancing of 
Athletic Trust Funds, as determined by the Treasurer's 
Office as of November 50, 1935, be accepted as the 
balance to be used in future bookkeeping. Also, that 
the bookkeeping for Athletic Trust Funds be done oy the 
Treasurer's Office. It was moved by Trustee Russell, 
seconded by Trustee Griggs, that the balance for Athletic 
Trust Funds on record in the Treasurer's Office as of 
November SO, 1955 be accepted as the balance for future 
bookkeeping. Also, that bookkeeping for Athletic Trust 
Funds be carried on in the Treasurer's Office. Motion 
was passed unanimously. 



t/hcL/ ^a^t^S s /ckry/ZJ <l£\ 



'Vice 
President 




cretary 
Pro Tempore 



767 






768 



TRUSTEE 



Call 



Minutes 



Committee to 

it upon 
Governor 



THE MASSACHUSETTS AGRICULTURAL COLLEGE 

MINUTES OF ANNUAL MEETING OF BOARD OF TRUSTEES 
January 23, 1936, 9:30 A.M., State House, Boston, Mass. 
Chairman, Vice-President Bowditch 



PRESENT ; Trustees Bowditch, Chandler, Dewey, Gannon, 
Mrs. Wilson, Commissioner Murphy, Griggs, 
Mrs. Leach, Malcolm, Buttriek. Monahan, 
Commissioner Reardon, Whitxnore, President 
Baker, Treasurer Kenney. 



The Secretary read the following call for the 



meeting: 



January 6, 1936 



To the Trustees of the 
Massachusetts State College 



Pursuant to the provisions of the by-laws, the 
Annual Meeting of the Board of Trustees of the Massachu- 
setts State College is hereby called to convene at the 
State House in Boston on Thursday, January 23, 1936 at 
9:30 A.M. 

This meeting will be preceded by meetings of 
standing committees on Wednesday, January 22 in accordance 
with the schedule attached hereto. 

Yours respectfully, 
/s/ Robert D. Hawley 
Secretary 

Upon motion by Trustee Griggs duly seconded, it 
was 

VOTED : To dispense with the reading of the minutes 
of the last Annual Meeting. 

The Chairman appointed Trustees Dewey, Whitmore 
and Griggs as a special committee to wait upon the Governo 
and notify him that the Board of Trustees was in session 
for its Annual Meeting. The Committee reported that His 
Excellency was absent on a trip to Washington on official 
business ana, therefore, would not be able to meet v.ith 
the Trustees at this ^inual Meeting, 



& 



e 



e 



I 



TRUSTEE 



THE MASSACHUSETTS AGRICULTURAL COLLEGE 

The Chairman appointed Trustees Dewey, Whitmore and 

Mrs. Leach as a special committee to present nominations 

for officers and committees for the ensuing year. 

The Secretary read the report of the meeting of 

the Executive Committee held in Boston on December 25,1935 

and, it was 

VOTED : To approve the actions of the Executive 
Committee as recorded. 

It was 

VOTED : That all actions taken by the committees of 
the Trustees during the year, which have not 
been approved subsequently by the Board of 
Trustees, be hereby approved. 

The following recommendations were received 

from the Trustee Committee on Faculty and Program of Study 

having resulted from the meeting of the committee on 

January 22. 

1. It was recommended that leaves of absence for 
six months in accordance with the professional 
improvement plan be granted to Mrs. A. T. Herr, 
State Leader of Home Demonstration Agents in 
the Extension Service, and Dr. Df;vid Rozman, 
Assistant Research Professor of Economics in 
the Experiment Station. 

2. It was recommended that Fred W. Morse, recently 
retired, be elected Emeritus Research Professor 
of Chemistry in the Experiment Station. 

3. It was recommended that President Hugh P. Baker 
be appointed official representative of the 
College at the Harvard Tercentenary celebration. 

4. It was recommended that the gift of the K. L. 
Butterfield Library be accepted and President 
Baker be authorized to express the appreciation 
of the Board to Mrs. Butterfield. 




769 



Nominating 
Committee 



Report of 
Executive 
Committee 



Committee 

Actions 

Approved 



Committee 
Recommenda- 
tions 



Leaves of 
Absence 

Mrs. Herr 

Dr. Rozman 



Prof. Morse 

Emeritus 

Professor 

Pres. Baker 
Delegate to 
Harvard 

Butterfield 
Library Gift 



770 



TRUSTEE 



Honorary 
Degrees 



Committee on 



OCX 



fety 



Deposits 



Investment 
Committee 



President 1 s 
House 

Maintenance 



THE MASSACHUSETTS AGRICULTURAL COLLEGE 

5, President Baker had presented to the Committee 
with his endorsements the recommendation of the 
Faculty and Cabinet that two distinguished 
alumni be granted honorary degrees and the 
recommendation of Trustee Monahan that His 
Excellency, The Governor, be granted the 
honorary LL.D. degree. Following discussion, 
it was 

VOTED : To recommend to the Board that the practice 
of last year be continued and that no 
honorary degrees be granted this year. 

There being no discussion of the recommenda- 
tions in response to the Chairman* s invitation, upon 
motion duly made and seconded, it was 

VOTED : To approve the recommendations of the 
Committee on Faculty and Program of 
Study as listed above. 

The following recommendations were received 

from the Trustee Committee on Finance as a result of its 

meeting on January 22. 

1. That, in accordance with the request of bank 
officials that one or more persons be 
authorized to accompany the Treasurer when 
he opens the safety deposit box of the 
College, Secretary Hawley and Assistant 
Treasurer Broadfoot be so authorized. 

2. That Trustees Bowditch, Whitmore and Buttrick 
be appointed an Investment Committee and that 
any two of them together with the Treasurer 
of the Board be authorized to sell, assign 

or transfer any or all bonds and/or stocks 
now or hereafter registered in the name of 
Massachusetts State College. 

3. That the Treasurer be authorized to request 
of the Commission on Administration and 
Finance, that a sum not to exceed $900 be 
apportioned out of appropriations to the 
College for the maintenance of the Presidents 
house. 






TRUSTEE 



771 



THE MASSACHUSETTS AGRICULTURAL COLLEGE 

4. That the President be authorized to present to 
the Federal Commissioner of Education the wish 
of the Trustees that he give consideration to 
the Act of the Massachusetts Legislature in 
1935 in connection with the distribution of 
Bankhead- Jones Funds for Resident Instruction, 

In the discussion of the recommendations of the 

Committee on Finance it was suggested that the Investment 

Committee inquire of the State Commissioner on Banking 

regarding investment policy. Upon motion duly made and 

seconded, it was 

VOTED ; To adopt the recommendations of the 
Committee on Finance. 

The Treasurer submitted his Annual Report in 

summary, having submitted detailed report in advance by 

mail to each member of the Board. It was suggested by 

Trustee Griggs that the return of receipts to the State 

Treasurer be emphasized in connection with reports on 

appropriations. Upon the recommendation of the Committee 

on Finance, it was 

VOTED : That the report of the Treasurer be 
accepted and printed. 

The following resolution was presented and 

unanimously adopted. 

Death of Dr. B utterfield 

The sudded death of Kenyon Leech Butterfield on 
November 26, 1955 was a significant loss to the Massachu- 
setts State College for, through his long service as its 
President and, since his retirement, his continuing 
activity in a field with which the College is so intimate- 
ly identified, he was both an inspiration and a guide to 
those now directing the work of the College. To many mem- 
bers of the Board, his death brought a keen sense of per- 
sonal loss because of their intimate acquaintance with him 
during the years of his administration. 



B ankh e a d - J on e s 
Funds 



Treasurer 1 s 

Annual 

Report 



Resolution on 
Dr. Butter- 
field' s Death 



772 



TRUSTEE 



Mr. Grigg T s 
Report re 
Association 
Governing 

Boards 



Policy re 
Cooperation 
between 
Colleges 



THE MASSACHUSETTS AGRICULTURAL COLLEGE 



Dr. 
College throu 
broadening it 
providing fac 
effectively r 
the College, 
that of rural 
vision of hig 
plish progres 
rural people 
hi s inf luenc e 



Butterfield guided the development of this 
gh eighteen crucial years energetically 
s scope of service to the Commonwealth and 
ilities that this service might be 
endered. Great as was his contribution to 
his service encompassed a much broader field, 

progress throughout the world. Through his 
h ideals and his strong efforts to accom- 
s in the approach towards those ideals, 
in America and in those foreign lands where 

has been felt are finding a better life. 



In recognition of the outstanding service which 
he rendered to the College governed by this Board and to 
the ideals for which that College stands it is hereby 
unanimously 

VOTED : That the above statement be inscribed upon 
the official records and a copy sent to 
Mrs. Butterfield. 

The Secretary described briefly the budget 
request of the College for the current year and reported 
upon the recommendation of the Budget Commissioner con- 
cerning it. 

Commissioner Murphy attended the meeting at 
this point. 

Trustee Griggs presented a summary of his re- 
port upon his attendance at the meeting of the Association 
of Governing Boards of State Universities and Allied 
Institutions. This report had been submitted in detail 
by mail to members of the Board. Upon motion by Trustee 
Gannon, it was 

VOTED ; To accept the report of Mr. Griggs as 
indicated. 

Mr. Griggs called particularly to the atten- 
tion of the Board the following report adopted at the 
meeting of the Association of Governing Boards: 



m 




<~ 






* 



THE MASSACHUSETTS AGRICULTURAL COLLEGE 



Report Adopted at Lincoln, 1955 

"Whereas: The increases in the number of 
students, as well as the continued expansion and multi- 
plication of the educational and scientific activities 
of our state institutions of higher education have placed 
upon the several states new responsibilities for the 
adequate support of these institutions, and 

"Whereas: The natural tendency of our higher 
educational institutions toward emulation and competition 
has raised in the public mind doubts as to the ability of 
states to maintain these institutions as they are now 
developing, and basic questions of the responsibility of 
these institutions for adapting their work to the need 
for public economy; and 

"Whereas: The present situation imposes upon 
the governing boards of state universities and allied 
institutions the double duty of safeguarding the fundamen 
tal social interests centered in public higher education, 
and of adjusting the operations of such institutions to 
the practical limitations of public taxation; and 

"Whereas: It appears to the representatives of 
this Association that broad public as well as educational 
interests point to the immediate desirability of examin- 
ing critically these problems and discovering ways and 
means for their solution; 

"Be It Resolved: That this Association create 
a special Committee on Regional Cooperation of Higher 
Educational Institutions, such committee to be composed 
of the President of the Association and three members 
each representing an institution belonging to this Assoc- 
iation, and three Presidents representing such 
tions; and 



773 



institu- 



te It Further Resolved: That it shall be the 
duty of said Committee to examine into the possibilities 
of effecting economical coordination of those specialized 
and relatively expensive scientific and educational 
activities of higher educational institutions whereby 
such activities may be developed on a regional rather 
than a state basis; and 

"Be It Further Resolved: That said Committee 
is authorized to present this problem to the officers of 
the American Council on Education with the view of 
securing funds for a proper study of this problem under 
the sponsorship of the American Council on Education." 

Following discussion and upon motion duly made 

and seconded, it was 



'. 



774 



TRUSTEE 



President T s 
nual jrt 



Commissioner 
7eardon ! s Talk 



Commissioner 
by's Talk 



Report of 
mating 

Committee 



THE MASSACHUSETTS AGRICULTURAL COLLEGE 

VOTED : That it is the sense of the meeting that 
the Board of Trustees is in sympathy 
with and subscribes to the policy set 
forth in the above report. 

Commissioner Reardon attended the meeting at 
this point. 

President Baker presented his Annual Report and 

upon motion by Trustee Griggs, it was 

VOTED: That the report be received with congratula- 
tions and appreciation and ordered printed 
as usual. 

The Chairman invited the Commissioner of Educa- 
tion, Mr. Reardon, to speak to the Trustees and in a 
brief and cordial statement the Commissioner assured the 
Board of the cooperation of the Department of Education. 

The Chairman also invited Commissioner Murphy 
to speak to the Trustees and the Commissioner expressed 
his interest in the College and in the development of 
Agriculture and satisfying rural home life through the 
cooperative efforts of the Department of Agriculture and 
the College. 

Trustee Dewey presented the report of the 

nominating committee recommending officers and committees 

of the Board of Trustees for the ensuing year. The 

Secretary was instructed to cast one ballot by vrhich it 

was unanimously 

VOTED : To elect the following officers and 
committees of the Board of Trustees 
for the ensuing year. 



- 



€ 



t 



TRUSTEE 



♦ 



* 



THE MASSACHUSETTS AGRICULTURAL COLLEGE 

Officers of the Board of Trustees 1956 

President, His Excellency, James M. Curley 
Vice-President, Nathaniel I. Bowditch of Fraraingham 
Secretary, Robert D. Hawley of Amherst 
Treasurer, Fred C. Kenney of Amherst 



Fred D. Griggs 
Lottie A. Leach 
David J. Malcolm 



Lottie A, Leach 
Lena Edge Wilson 
William C. Monahan 



Program of Stu dy and Fa culty 

Davis R. Dewey, Chairman 
James F. Bacon 
John F. Gannon 

James G. Reardon 

Committee on E xtension 

Fred D. Griggs, Chairman 
Davis R, Dewey 
John F. Gannon 

James G. Reardon 

Committee on Agriculture 

John Chandler, Chairman ¥/illiam C. Monahan 
David J. Malcolm Lena Edge Wilson 

Howard Haines Murphy 

Committee on Experi me nt S tation 

■ ■ — ■ — w— ww ww w — ■ ^ * m-i * i i ■ m . ■ i ■■ ■ ii wi ■ ^— — 

David H. Buttrick, Chairman David J. Malcolm 
John Chandler Philip F. Whitmore 

Harold L. Frost Lottie A. Leach 



Committee on Horticulture 

Harold L. Frost, Chairman 
Lottie A. Leach 

Committee on Buildings and Grounds 



William C. Monahan 
Howard Haines Murphy 



Philip F. Whitmore, Chairman David H. Buttrick 
James F. Bacon David J. Malcolm 

Lena Edge Wilson 

Committee on Finance 

Joseph W. Bartlett, Chairman John Chandler 
David H. Buttrick Harold L. Frost 

Philip F. Whitmore 



775 



Election of 
Officers ' 



Election of 
Committees 



776 



TRUSTEE 



THE MASSACHUSETTS AGRICULTURAL COLLEGE 



ommittee on Legislation 



James F. Bacon, Chairman Joseph W. Bartlett 

Fred D. Griggs 

Executive Comm ittee 

Nathaniel I. Bowditch, Chairman James F. Bacon 

Philip F. Whitmore 

The President of the College and the Vice- 
President of the Board are ex-officio members of each 
committee. 

The meeting adjourned at 11:50 A.M. 



^/L ,/r^^J J '^LduzA 



>Vice President 




Secretary 



(§ 




r=r 







THE MASSACHUSETTS AGRICULTURAL COLLEGE 

MINUTES OF SPECIAL MEETING OF BOARD OF TRUSTEES 
May 14, 1936, 2:00 P.M., President's Office, Amherst. 

Chairman, Trustee Bowditch 



PRESENT : 



Trustees Bowditch, Buttrick, Malcolm, 
Griggs, Chandler, Dewey, Bartlett, Mona- 
han, Rear don, Murphy, Gannon, Frost, 
Mrs. Leach, Mrs. Wilson, President Baker, 
also Treasurer Kenney. 



The following is the call for the meeting. 



April 15, 1936 



To Board of Trustees 
Massachusetts State College 



Upon written request of three members of the 
Board of Trustees, which is in accordance with the pro- 
visions of the by-laws, a special meeting of the Board 
is hereby called to convene at the President's Office 
in Amherst at ten-thirty o'clock in the forenoon on 
Thursday, May 14, 1936. 

The purpose of this meeting will be to attend 
the student convocation at eleven o'clock and following 
luncheon at twelve o'clock to consider such matters of 
official business as personnel appointments, leaves of 
absence, construction and other matters of routine busi- 
ness as presented by the President of the College. 

Commissioner Reardon has consented to give the 
address at the student convocation in the forenoon. 

Respectfully yours, 

/s/ Robert B. Hawley 
Secretary 

The minutes of the preceding meeting were read 
and approved. 

The Treasurer presented a brief financial re- 
port. 

The following recommendations were received 
from trie Trustee Committee on Faculty and Program of 
Study. 



777 



Call 



Treasurer' s 
Report 



Recommendations 
Committee on 
Program of 
Study 



778 



TRUSTEE 



New Courses 



New Positions 



THE MASSACHUSETTS AGRICULTURAL COLLEGE 



1. That the following new courses be approved: 



2. 



Assistant 
Bean 

Reclassifica- 
tion 



Resignations 

and 

Appointments 



Professor 
Mackimmie* s 
Leave 



Mrs.Page ! s 
Leave 



Miss Gerard f s 


7. 


Leave 




Miss Foley f s 


8. 


Leave 




F.C. Sears 


9. 


Professor 




Emeritus 




Reorganization 


10, 


Pomology 





3, 



4. 



5. 



6. 



of 



Mathematics 55 — Mathematics 
Mathematics 62 — Statistics 
Plant Breeding 81 and 82 
Education 79 — Educational Tests 
ments 



Finance 



and 



Measure- 



That the following new positions be authorized 
under Federal Bankhead-Jones funds. 

Instructor in Agronomy, salary rate |1,620 
Instructor in English, salary rate $1,620 
Instructor in Mathematics, salary rate |1,620 
Assistant Professor Biology, salary rate 



$2,220 
Instructor 
11,620 



Physical Education, salary rate 



That the rank of the Assistant Dean be changed 
from Assistant Professor to Professor and the 
salary rate changed accordingly from £3,300 to 
$3,480. The additional cost to be met from 
Federal Bankhead-Jones Funds. 



% 



That the resignations and appointments reported 
by the President and listed in the report of the 
meeting of the Committee on Faculty and Program 
of study be confirmed. 

That leave of absence for professional improve- 
ment for a period of one year be granted to 
Professor A. A. Mackimmie with pay for the first 
six months of the period. 

That leave of absence for professional improve- 
ment with pay be granted to Mrs. Esther Cooley 
Page for a period of six months beginning 
January 1, 1937. 

That leave of absence be granted to Miss Grace 
B. Gerard for the period January 1, 1937 to 
June 15, 1937 v/ithout pay. 

That leave of absence with pay for a period not 
to exceed six months be granted to Miss May 
Foley on account of illness. 

That Professor F. C. Sears be elected Emeritus 
Professor of Pomology upon his retirement from 
active service June 30, 1936. 

That upon the retirement of Professor Sears, 
Professor R. -^. VanMeter be appointed Head of 
the Department of Pomology and Professor A. P. 
French promoted from Assistant Professor of 
Pomology to Professor of Pomology and Plant 
Breeding. 





* 



TRUSTEE 



1 



♦ 



THE MASSACHUSETTS AGRICULTURAL COLLEGE 

It was 

VOTED ; To approve the ten recommendations of 

the Committee on Faculty and Program of 
Study as listed above. 

Certain employees of the Federal Government 

stationed on the Campus have petitioned for a remission 

of tuition in connection with certain graduate courses 

which they wish to pursue in the College. According to 

Trustee ruling, employees of the College may be excused 

by the President from the payment of tuition, i'his 

petition raises the question as to whether or not the 

Trustees wish to extend this privilege to include those 

professional employees of the Federal Government who are 

stationed on the Campus. Upon the recommendation of the 

President, it was 

VOTED ; To authorize the President of the College 
to remit the tuition of those professional 
employees of the Federal Government who 
are stationed on the Campus and who wish 
to enroll for graduate study in the College. 

President Baker reported the gift of the sum 
of approximately §2,500 for the furtherance of 4-H Club 
work at the College and the proposal to use this sum for 
the erection of a second 4-H Club building near the 
present building. The Campus Planning Council has recom- 
mended that the proposed building, if approved, be 
located in the grove east of the present building. Upon 
the recommendation of the President, it was 

VOTED ; To accept with thanks the gift of $2,500 
for the furtherance of 4-H Club work and 
to approve the construction of a second 
4-H Club building to be located in the 
grove east of the present 4-H building. 



779 



Remission of 
Tuition 
Federal 
Employees 



4-H Club 
Gift 



4-H Club 
House 



780 



TRUSTEE 



Supplementary 
Budget 



THE MASSACHUSETTS AGRICULTURAL COLLEGE 

The President submitted a proposed supplemen- 
tary budget for the College composed of eleven items and 
totaling 113,950. After consideration of the various 
items included, upon motion duly made and seconded, it 
v/as 

VOTED : To approve the budget as proposed. 

Following further discussion upon motion by 
Trustee Griggs, it was 

VOTED : To reconsider the supplementary budget. 

As a result of further consideration, it was 

VOTED : To reduce Item 7 "Completion of Drainage 

of Ward Building with changes in foundation, 
wall and interior equipment" from $3,000 
to §1,500 with the suggestion that the 
various changes be itemized. 

There was discussion concerning Item 10 "Renova- 
tion and changes in laboratories in Stockbridge Hall." 
It was moved and seconded that this item be included 
v/ith first sentence of the description omitted. When this 
motion was put it v/as lost and the Chairman ruled that the 
intent was to omit the item from the budget. Subsequently 
it was 

VOTED: To approve the supplementary budget as 
modified with Item 7 reduced to £1,500 
and Item 10 omitted, makin; the total 
for the budget $11, 550.00 . 

* 

The President presented a report on Federal 
emergency projects being conducted at the College involv- 
ing Federal appropriations of ^43,758.50. 





€ 



THE MASSACHUSETTS AGRICULTURAL COLLEGE 

Attention was called to a hearing on May 19 be- 
fore the Legislative Committee on Ways and Means concern- 
ing bill proposing distribution of Federal Bankhead-Jones 
Funds for resident instruction in the proportion of one- 
third to Massachusetts Institute of Technology and two- 
thirds to Massachusetts State College. Follovving dis- 
cussion, it was 

VOTED: That Trustees Bacon and Buttrick and 

Secretary Hawley represent the Trustees 
at this hearing. 

The meeting adjourned at 5:40 P. M. 



^lZjL-/h~u^<LXj ' S> } /(-pzrn^YUa^ 



Vice 
President 




Secretary 



! 



781 



Hearing re 

Bankhead-Jones 

Funds 



78: 



TRUSTEE 



Call 



Minutes 



THE MASSACHUSETTS AGRICULTURAL COLLEGE 

MINUTES OF SEMI- ANNUAL MEETING OF BOARD OF TRUSTEES 

President's Office, 10:15 A.M., June 8, 1936 

Vice-President Bowditch presided. 

PRESENT : Trustees Bowditch, ^uttrick, Mrs. Leach, 
Whitmore, Murphy, Monahan, Frost, Griggs, 
Mrs. ^Ilson, Chandler, Malcolm, President 
Baker. 

The following is the call for the meeting. 

May 25, 1936 

Board of Trustees 
Massachusetts State College 

Pursuant to the provisions of the by-laws, the 
semi-annual meeting of the Board of Trustees of the Massa 
chusetts State College is hereby called to convene at the 
President's Office at Amherst at 10 o'clock A.M. Monday, 
June 8, 1936. The purpose of the meeting will be to pass 
upon the recommendations of the Faculty regarding candi- 
dates for degrees and to consider such other matters of 
business as the President properly may present. 

Yours respectfully, 

/s/ Robert D. Hawley 
Secretary 

The minutes of the preceding meeting were app- 
roved without reading. 

Upon the recommendation of the faculty of the 



B.S. Degrees College, it was 



VOTED : To confer the degree Bachelor of Science 
upon the following 227 members of the 
Class of 1936. 

SUMMA CUM LAUDE 

Marian Elizabeth Bullard 

MAGNA CUM LAUDE 

Alfred Her old Brueckner Elizabeth Warner Eager 
Allyn Hubbard Fisher Samuel Neuman 

Harry Davis Pratt 



- 




(K 



# 



TRUSTEE 



THE MASSACHUSETTS AGRICULTURAL COLLEGE 



CUM LAUDE 



Arthur Frederick Bixby 
James Wellington Clapp 
Leonta Gertrude Horrigan 

Charles 



Edward Lavin 
Elizabeth Low 
Lester Carl Peterson 
Norman Sjogren 



RITE 



Ralph Terry Adams 
Elmer Howes Allen 
George Howard Allen 
Roger Everett Allen 
Gertrude Helen Allis 
Michael Anacki 
Harriett Katherine Andrus 
Isaac Moses Arenberg 
Ralph Alexander Arnold 
Chester Ira Babcock, Jr. 
Maurice Herman Baizman 
Elizabeth Weston Baker 
Daniel Algerd Balavich 
Donald lurch Ballou 
Randolph Corbin Barrows 
Jackson Arthur Barton 
Carleton Everett Bearse 
Morris Bernstein 
Ollie Leonard Bertorelli 
Florence Selma Bilsky 
Gordon Harold Bishop 
William Roderic Bliss 
Clare Elizebeth Bosv/orth 
Myles Gerald Boy Ian 
Barbara Barker Bradley 
Robert Story Bray 
Owen Joseph Brennan, Jr. 
Ella Mabel Bridges 
Arnold Charles Briere 
Elva Louise Britton 
Helen Norris Bruns 
Frederick Kemraerer Bull 
Edmond Leland Cance 
Mary Alice Cay/ley 
Madelin Damon Chase 
Milton Earle Chase 
William Wallace Chilson 
Robert Bro?rci Clark 
James Roe Clarke 
Frederick Richard Congdon 
Philip Richard Cook 
Mary Abbie Cooney 
Mary Dorothy Corcoran 



783 



Lois Crabtree 
Joseph Vincent Cronin 
Gerald David Garth Crowe 
Janina Mary Czajkowski 
John Danaczko, Jr. 
James Davidson 
Barbara Jewell Davis 
Domenic DeFelice 
Louis deWilde 
Ralph Warren Dimock 
Donald Tracy Donnelly 
Hazel Marie Dow 
Frances Marie Driscoll 
Paul John Driscoll 
Malcolm Ramsey Dunbar 
Carl Frederick Dunker 
Alden Robinson Eaton 
Henry Holton Elder 
Herbert William Ferguson 
Eleanor Clarke Fillmore 
Carleton Jesse Finkelstein 
Franklin Howe Fiske 
Patrick James Fitzgerald 
Anna Agnes Flynn 
John Hani on Flynn 
Marguerite Marilyn Ford 
Bertram Robin Forer 
Jackson Walter Foster 
John Estrela Franco 
Bradley Luther Frye 
Dorothy Garbose 
Alfred Hamilton Gardner, Jr. 
Chester Mason Gates 
Lewis Chapman Gillett 
Willard Raymor Gillette 
Irene Virginia Gingras 
Lynn Rodney Glazier 
Dean Newton Glick 
Myer Glickstein 
Charles Nelson Glynn 
William Leonard Goddard 
Arthur Jacob Gold 
David Spencer Goldman 



784 



TRUSTEE 



THE MASSACHUSETTS AGRICULTURAL COLLEGE 



<m 



Louise Charlotte Govone 
Frank Greenwood 
Ellen Guion 

Christine Evelyn Hakanson 
Harold Homer Hale 
Louise Mary Haley 
Constance Hathaway Hall 
Calvin Siddell Hannura 
Donald Henry Haselhuhn 
Robert Russell Harris 
Ad in Allyne Hixon 
Alice Lillian Hopkins 
Mary Frances Horgan 
Wendell -^oy Hovey 
Margaret Lois Hutchinson 
Robert Frederick Hutt 
Stuart Farnham Jill son 
Carroll Reed Johnson 
David Lewis Johnson 
Marion' minora Jones 
Maxwell Kaplovitz 
Allan Max Kaufman 
Bernard John Kelleher 
Richard Tomfohrde Kennett 
James Kerr, Jr. 
Theodore William Kerr, Jr. 
Priscilla King 
Harlan Wesley Kingsbury 
Lucy Orcelia Kingston 
Mildred Elizabeth Kleyla 
David Klickstein 
Emil John Koenig, Jr. 
Joseph Harold Krasnoff 
Charles Lewis Krtil 
Marjorie Louise Lannon 
Norvin Clement Laubenstein 
Edward Victor Law 
Marguerite Rita LeDuc 
Frederick Anthony Lehr 
Dolores Emma Lesquier 
Lester Henry Levine 
Lucien Bingham Lillie, III 
Madeline Hazel Lincoln 
Robert Bradley Lincoln 
Irving Lipovsky 
Robert Mellor Logan 
Francis Alfred Lord 
Thomas Henry Lord 
Cummings Lincoln Lothrop,III 
Helen Lubach 
Phyllis Garry Macintosh 
Ronald Carnegie Malloch 
Evelyn Marie Mallory 
Charles William Marsh 



Gertrude Evelyn Martin 
Dorothy Louise Masters 
John Lev/is McConchie 
Alma Standi sh Merry 
Abraham Irving Michael son 
Harold Austin Midgley, Jr. 
Philip Barton Miner 
George Edward Monroe 
Charles Henry Moran 
Harold Laurud Mo r land 
Kenneth Raycraft Newman 
Wm. Joseph MacKenzie Newman 
Peter Andrew Nietupski 
Terrence Shanahan Norwood 
Lorraine Fisherdick Noyes 
Dorothy Nurmi 
Katherine Louise T 3rien 
Clarence Adelbert Packard 
Howard Clarence Parker 
Edith Mildred Parsons 
Marion Louise Paulding 
David Berstein Pearlmutter 
Richard Tufts Peckham 
Clare Lin?ifood Pineo 
Daniel Clayton Plastridge 
Bessie Louise Proctor 
Raymond Norris Proctor 
Arthur Allan Putnam 
Oliver Ripley Putnam 
Beatrice Norma Rafter 
Walter Dalton Raleigh 
Helen Marie Reardon 
Ruth Vassall Reed 
Albert Peter Richards 
Richard Grimshaw Riley 
William Arthur Rose 
Charles irescott Roys 
Jacob Joseph Rutstein 
Addison Lawton Sandford 
Florence Mae Saulnier 
Helen Louise Sawyer 
Arnold Samuel Shulkin 
George Walker Simmons, Jr. 
Franc ene Smith 
Gladys Virginia Smith 
Edward Joseph Soulliere 
Velda Stefanelli 
John William Stewart, Jr. 
Virginia Stratton 
Edmund Joseph Sullivan 
Ralph Frederick Sweinberger 
Royal Kendrick Tanner 
David Henry Taylor 
Charles Vallentine Thayer 



- 



*- 




• 



TRUSTEE 



t 



THE MASSACHUSETTS AGRICULTURAL COLLEGE 



Richard Hugh Thompson 
Wallace Wetherell Thompson 
Adolph Edward Tikof ski 
Owen Smith Trask 
James Alden Valentine, Jr. 
George Arthur VassoS, Jr. 
Gertrude Mabel Vickery 
Walter Wainio 
Roger Lewis Warner 
Frances Yventworth 



William Gordon Whaley 
Spofford Whitaker 
Marjorie Eleanor Whitney 
Luther Lincoln Willard 
Sylvia Bancroft Winsor 
Thomas Bernard Wolcott 
John Langille Wood 
Betsy Worden 
John Michael Zak 
Apolonia Julia Ziomek 



Upon the recommendation of the faculty of the 



College, it was 



VOTED: 



To confer the degree Bachelor of Vocational 
Agriculture upon Raymond Milton Snow, Jr. 
and Jack Sturtevant, both of the class of 
1956. 



Upon the recommendation of the faculty of the 
College, it was 

VOTED : To confer the degree Bachelor of Landscape 
Architecture upon Samuel Peaslee Snow. 

Upon the recommendation of the faculty of the 

Graduate School, . it was 

VOTED : To confer the degree Master of Science upon 
the following thirty-five candidates. 



Frederick Mewcomb Andrews 
Donald Ashton Bean 
Marguerite Elizabeth Bicknell 
Jeannette Sears Casey 
Carl Francis Clancy 
Gladys Mae Cook 
Bernardine Joan Cooney 
Lawrence Sumner Dickinson 
Alice Isabel Dwight 
John Nelson Ever son 
lone Kelsey Flower 
Alan Foster Flynn 
Rudolph John Louis Frundt 
Marian Bunton Gleason 
James Frank Hassett 
Walter Henricks Hodge - 
Vladimir Jancik 

Philip Carlton 



David Jasper Knight 
Anna Frances LaRose 
Arthur Sidney Levine 
Alexander Ambrose Lucey 
Oreana Alma Herriam 
Joseph Miller 
Louis Hale Moseley 
Robert Vincent Murray 
Julius Novick 
Fred Chef fins Numbers 
Miriam Pomerantz 
Henry Frank Riseman 
William Fenton Robertson 
Charles Gertner Sharpe 
Gilbert Simpson 
Marion Estelle Smith 
Leon Stanisiewski 
Stone 



785 



B.V.A. Degree 



13. L. A. Degree 



U.S. Degree 



786 



TRUSTEE 



Ph.D. Degree 



WPA Projects 



Leaves of 
Absence 



tments 



THE MASSACHUSETTS AGRICULTURAL COLLEGE 

Upon the recommendation of the faculty of the 

Graduate School, it was 

VOTED : To confer the degree Doctor of Philosophy 

upon Robert Edward Buck and Inez Wilhelmena 
Williams. 

President Baker described the status of present 

WPA projects and spoke of the possibility of securing 

further projects when new Federal appropriations became 

available. At his suggestion, it was 

VOTED: To continue the authority conferred upon 
the President by the Trustees at their 
meeting on September 11,1924 when he was 
authorized to make official request for 
further Federal funds for use at the 
College as m^r seem to him desirable. 

Upon the recommendation of the President, it 



was 



VOTED : To grant the following leaves of absence 
without pay: 

Miss Carrolle E. Anderson, Instructor in 
Botany, leave of absence for one year with- 
out pay from September 1, 1956 to August 31, 
1927. 

Ernest M. parrott, Instructor in Chemistry, 
leave of absence for one year without pay 
from September 1,1956 to August 31,1957. 

It was 

VOTED : To confirm the following appointments: 

Walter EL Hodge, Instructor in Botany, 
effective September 1,1956 at a salary 
rate of <-1440, appointment for a period 
of absence of Lliss Anderson. 

Lawrence V. Loy, Extension Specialist in 
Community Organization and Recreation, 
effective August 15,1956, salary £3,000, 
nev; position authorized on Federal Bank- 
head-Jones funds. 



~ 







• 



TRUSTEE 



f 



t 



THE MASSACHUSETTS AGRICULTURAL COLLEGE 

It was 

VOTED ; To accept the resignation of Ronald L. 
Mighell, Assistant Research Professor 
of Farm Management effective May SI, 1956. 

The President presented to the Trustees with 

his approval the recommendation of the Faculty Committee 

on Course of Study that the following three courses be 

added to the curriculum: 



787 



Resignation 



Forestry 63 
Forestry 64 



Forest utilization — 3 credits 
Introduction to «"ild Life Management - 

3 credits 
Forestry 65 - Principles of Wild Life Conservation - 

2 credits 

It was 

VOTED ; To approve the inclusion of the three above 
named courses in the curriculum. 

There was received from Director Sievers of the 
Experiment Station and presented to the Trustees by the 
President with his recommendation a proposed budget for 
the increase in Federal Bankhe ad- Jones funds for the 
Experiment Station for the Federal fiscal year beginning 
July 1, 1936. These recommendations included the follow- 



New Courses 



Experiment 

Station 

Budget 



ing: 



Hew position - Research Assistant Professor in 
Chemistry at $2400 per annum. 

Research Assistant in Agronomy, ^1620. 

Promotion of Assistant Research Professor, Dr. 

David Rozman to Research Professor at salary 
rate of $3600. 

Promotion of Dr. James E. Fuller, Assistant Re- 
search Professor of Bacteriology to Research 
Professor of Bacteriology at salary rate of 
$3600. 

Total budget 



,520. 



It was 

VOTED : To adopt the budget as recommended by the 
Director and the President. 



788 



TRUSTEE 



Oakite 

Coop. 

Project 



Butterfield 
Memorial 



Fall Meeting 



THE MASSACHUSETTS AGRICULTURAL COLLEGE 

There was received from the Director of the 
Experiment Station and recommended by the President, a 
proposed cooperative research project with the Oakite 
Products Inc. of New York City by which the Experiment 
Station would receive a grant of fSOO from this company 
to finance the cost of certain investigations concerning 
the value of a product of the company in the control of 
brown patch of grass. The President pointed out that 
this project was in line with similar cooperative pro- 
jects with a number of commercial firms. He read a list 
of such projects. There was considerable discussion of 
this phase of activity of the Experiment Station, follow- 
ing which, it was 

VOTED : To approve the project and to authorize 
the President to accept the fund granted 
under its terms. 

President Baker suggested the possibility of 
the publication of a memorial booklet in honor of Dr. 
Kenyon L. Butterfield, similar to the booklet dedicated 
to Dr. R. W. Thatcher and estimated that an edition of 
2500 such booklets could be secured for $100. There was 
discussion of the use of Trust fund income for this pur- 
pose and upon motion by Trustee Griggs, it was 

VOTED : That the chair appoint a special committee 
of three to consider a suitable memorial 
for Dr. Butterfield. The chair appointed 
the following committee: Trustees Griggs, 
Bowditch and President Baker. 

Mrs. Leach suggested the desirability of an 

inspection of the Mt. Toby reservation by the Trustees 
which seemed to meet with hearty approval and it was 



f 




e 






THE MASSACHUSETTS AGRICULTURAL COLLEGE 

specifically requested that such a meeting be arranged 
for the fall. 

President Baker described the need of the 
College for an illustrated booklet which would describe 
the work of the institution for the benefit of the people 
of the State. Trustee Monahan suggested the possibility 
of including in such a booklet a description of the voca- 
tions for which the College trains men and women and the 
opportunities in such vocations. It was 

VOTED : To be the sense of the meeting that the 
College should publish an illustrated 
booklet descriptive of its work with 
particular reference to placement and 
vocational service. 

The Secretary called attention to the need of 

providing for the annual budget meeting of the Board and 

following discussion, it was 

VOTED ; To authorize the Secretary to call the 
annual budget meeting of the Board to- 
gether with necessary Committee meetings 
upon convenient dates during the vreek of 
September 28, 1956. 

There was discussion as to the advisability of 
holding these budget meetings in Amherst in connection 
with a visit to the Mt . Toby reservation but some objec- 
tion was raised to this. The final decision was left 
with the President of the College and the Secretary of 
the Board. 

The meeting adjourned at 12 M. 



789 



Illustrated 
Booklet 



^/{ZL f / ^u7^/^lf cU. 




Vice 
President 



Secretary 



Annual 
Budget 

Meeting 



790 


t — _ _: 


— ~ — i — 




THE MASSACHUSETTS AGRICULTURAL COLLEGE 


€ 


TRUSTEE 


MINUTES OF SPECIAL MEETING OF BOARD OF TRUSTEES 
September 50, 1956, 9:30 A.M., State House, Boston 
Chairman, Trustee Bowditeh 






PRESENT: Trustees Bowditeh, Buttriek, Bacon, Frost, 






Malcolm, Whitmore, Griggs, Monahan, 






Bartlett, Mrs. Wilson, Mrs. Leach, 






President Baker, Treasurer Kenney. 






Following is the call for the meeting. 






September 24, 1956. 




Call 


Board of Trustees 
Massachusetts State College 

In accordance with action of the Board of 
Trustees at its meeting on June 8, a special meeting of 
the Board is hereby called to convene at the State House 




>. 


in Boston at 8:50 A.M. on Wednesday, September 30, 1926. 
The purpose of this meeting will be to consider the re- 
ports of Committees concerning the Budget for the ensuing 
year and such other matters as properly may be presented. 


€ 




Respectfully yours, 


F 




/s/ Robert D. Hawley 






Secretary 






It was 






VOTED: To waive the reading of the minutes of the 






preceding meeting. 






Upon the recommendation of the Committee on 






Faculty and Program of Study, it was 






VOTED: To confirm the promotions, new appoint- 






ments, resignations and leaves of absence 






as reported by the President. 






PROMOTIONS 




Promotions 


Richard C. Foley from Instructor to Assistant Professor 
of Animal Husbandry, September 1, 1956, $2,220. 

Claude C. Neet from Instructor to Assistant Professor 
of Psychology, September 1, 1936, £2,220. 


£ 



• 



TRUSTEE 



* 



"J> 



THE MASSACHUSETTS AGRICULTURAL COLLEGE 



NEW APPOINTMENTS 

Melby W. Brady, Assistant State Club Leader, July 27, 
1956, $2,820. 

Alfred A. Brown, Assistant Research Professor of Agri- 
cultural Economics and Farm Management, September 1, 
19S6, $2,400. 

Robert E. Buck, Laboratory Assistant in Chemistry, 
October 1, 1936, $1,140. 

John Calvi, Laboratory Assistant in Chemistry, September 
1, 1936, $1,140. 

Wilho Frigard, Instructor in Physical Education, Sep- 
tember 1, 1936, |1,500. 

James C. Hillier, Instructor in Animal Husbandry, Sep- 
tember 1, 1956, $1,620. 

Walter H. Hodge, Instructor in Botany, September 1,1956, 
$1,440. 

Leonta G. Horrigan, Instructor in English, September 1, 
1936, $1,620. 

William H. Lachman, Jr., Instructor in Olericulture, 
September 1, 1936, $1,620. 

C. Collis Lyle, Jr., Instructor in German, September 1, 
1936, $1,620. 

Lawrence V. Loy, Extension Specialist in Community 

Organization and Recreation, August 15, 1956, $3,000. 

Walter A. Maclinn, Instructor in Horticultural Manufac- 
tures, October 1, 1956, $1,620. 

Bryan C. Redmon, Instructor in Chemistrv, September 1, 
1936, $1,620. 

John D. Swenson, Instructor in Mathematics, Seutember 1, 
1956, $1,620. 

Gilbert L. Woodside, Assistant Professor of Biology, 
September 1, 1956, $2,220. 

Hrant M. Yegian, Research Assistant in Agronomy, Sep- 
tember 1, 1936, $1,620. 



791 



Appointments 



RESIGNATIONS 
Evelyn A. Beaman, Instructor in English, August 31,1956. 
Charles S. Gibbs, Research Professor of Veterinary Science 

September 30,1936. 
Ronald L. Mighell, Assistant Research Professor of Farm 

Management, May 31, 1936. 

LEAVES OF ABSENCE 
Carrolle E. Anderson, Instructor in Botany, leave of 

absence for one year without pay. 
Ernest I. Parrott, Instructor in Chemistry, leave of 

absence for one year without pay. 



Resignations 



Leaves of 
Absence 



792 



TRUSTEE 



New Courses 



New 

Graduate 
C our s'e 



Perquisites 



THE MASSACHUSETTS AGRICULTURAL COLLEGE 

Upon the recommendation of the Committee on 

Faculty and Program of Study, it v/as 

VOTED ; That the five courses recommended by the 
Faculty of the College as follows: in 
Forestry; Forest Utilization, Principles 
of Wildlife Conservation and Introduction 

to Wildlife Management: in Home Economics; 
Institutional Foods and Management: in 
Economics; Economic Theory and Social 
Progress be approved. 

Upon the recommendation of the Committee on 

Faculty and Program of Study, it was 

VOTED : To approve the recommendation of the 

Faculty of the Graduate School that the 
course leading to the Doctor of Philosophy 
degree in ^ood Technology be included in 
the curriculum of the Graduate School. 

The matter of perquisites to College employees 
was referred to the Board of Trustees by the Committee 
on Faculty and Program of Study without recommendation. 
Question has arisen due to the report of the State 
Auditor criticizing the present procedure under which 
employees receiving houses as part of their salary some 
times rent rooms therein to students. Also is involved 
the question of allowing milk to the Farm Superintendent 
and farm milkers as perquisite. Following extended con- 
sideration of the problem and upon motion by Mr. Monahan, 
duly seconded, it was 

VOTED : That in cases where dwellings are included 
as part of employee 1 s salary, the Trustees 
authorize the President to notify these 
employees that they are to enjoy free and 
uncontrolled use of these dwellings and 
furthermore that the practice of giving 
milk as a perquisite be discontinued. 



" 








■f> 



TRUSTEE 



I 



793 



THE MASSACHUSETTS AGRICULTURAL COLLEGE 

Upon the recommendation of the Trustee Committee 

on Faculty and Program of Study, it was 

VOTED : To authorize the President to arrange for 
the hiring of a private transportation 
agency carrying adequate liability in- 
surance to transport students for necessary 
field trips. 

Upon the recommendation of the Trustee Committee 

on Faculty and Program of Study, it was 

VOTED : To authorize the payment from Student Trust 
Funds of annual extra compensation for five 
members of the staff as recommended by the 
Faculty Academics Activities Board and en- 
dorsed by the President as follows: 

Professor Prince, Coach of Debating, $75 
Professor Dickinson, Business Manager, |150 
Professor Rand, Dramatic Coach, #150 
Mr. Robertson for construction of scenery, 

up to $100 
Mr. Shauwecker, Custodian of properties, 



Bus Service 



The recent death of Edward Morgan Lewis, former 

President of the College, was recalled with deep regret 

and, it was 

VOTED : To inscribe upon the official records of 

the Trustees and transmit to the family the 
follovving memorial statement. 

Memorial Statement 

Edward Morgan Lewis 

1872 - 1956 

In the death of Edward Morgan Le?/is on May 25, 
1956, the Massachusetts State College and those engaged 
in its service have lost a true friend, one who for many 
years guided the progress of the College and who always 
cherished for it a deep affection. 



Extra 
Compensation 



Academics 



Dr. Lewis 
Memorial 



of 



Dr. Lewis to the 



College 



is 



The great service 
already a matter of official record. During the sixteen 
years of his incumbency he held many offices including 
those of Professor of Literature, Head of the Division of 
Humanities, Dean of the College and President. He 
occupied all of these with distinction and through them 
made enduring contributions to the development or the 






794 



TRUSTEE 



New 4-H 
Club House 



Dickinson 

Property 

Lease 



Budget 



THE MASSACHUSETTS AGRICULTURAL COLLEGE 

College and its service to the Commonwealth. 

His human qualities endeared him to all with 
whom he came in contact. Students and faculty under- 
stood him and loved him and we, the Trustees, hold most 
dear our memory of Dr. Lewis as President and as friend. 

Upon the recommendation of the Trustee Committee 

on Buildings and Grounds, it was 

VOTED : To authorize Mr. G. L. Farley, State 4-H 
Club Leader, to use funds given for the 
construction of a second 4-H building and 
to proceed with such construction under 
the general supervision of the President 
and Ire a surer* 

Upon the recommendation of the Committee on 

Buildings and Grounds, it was 

VOTED : To authorize the President to negotiate a 
lease of the Dickinson property north of 
the Campus for a period of three years at 
a rental of not more than $1,000 per year 
in accordance with the terms described 
in the lease form presented. 

The proposed budget for the College for the 

year 1936-37 having been in the hands of members of the 

Board of Trustees for one week prior to this meeting and 

having been formally considered by the various Committees 

of the Board on the day preceding was considered. Upon 

the recommendation of the Trustee Committee on Finance, 



it was 



VOTED : That the budget for maintenance as present- 
ed, amounting to $1,163,553 for State funds 
and $272,221 for Federal funds, be adopted 
including the establishment of new positions 
as listed and the reclassification of 
positions as recommended, except that the 
salary rate for proposed Publications 
Editor be reduced to $1,800 and that the 
position Instructor in Horticultural Manu- 
factures be changed to Assistant Professor 
at ^g,220. 



" 



m 



£ 



TRUSTEE 



% 



% 



THE MASSACHUSETTS AGRICULTURAL COLLEGE 

In accordance with action of the Trustee 
Committee on Finance, the President presented to the 
Board a proposed "budget for special appropriations com- 
posed of 28 items totaling $472,800. The probability of 
securing P.F.A. funds for the reconstruction of the Old 
Library was pointed out and if this transpires this item 
will be omitted from the budget, thus reducing the total 
to #452,800. The list of items follows: 



Department or 
Category 



Project 



Amount 



1. Major Construction Reconstruction of Old 

Library 



2. 

3. 

4. Land Acquisition 

5. 

6. 

7. Genl. Improvements 

8. 

9. 



10. 

11. 
12. 



$40,000 
250,000 



15. 0. 
14. 

15. 
16. 



0C M . 



Women T s Building 

Reconstruction of South 

College 40,000 

Dickinson Property 15,000 

Powers Property 2,500 

Avery Land 5,000 

Grand Piano for Bowker 

Auditorium 1,500 

Reorganization of Campus 

Electric System 4,000 

Replacement of Telephone 
cable and reorganization 
of system 10,000 

Fire protection, sprinkler 
system and other safety 
devices as recommended 
by State Fire Inspector 15,000 

Sound reinforcing system 
and soundfilm equipment 
for Bowker Auditorium 2,200 

Duplicating equipment for 

announcements, bulletins, 3,000 

Incinerator and Building 3,500 
Equipment for gas genera- 
ting plant 5,200 

Renew wiring and improve 
lighting at Stockbridge 
Hall and Clark Kail 5,500 

Filtering equipment for 

Power Plant Boilers 1,600 



795 



796 



TRUSTEE 



THE MASSACHUSETTS AGRICULTURAL COLLEGE 



Department or 
Category „ 



Project 



Amount 



* 



17. 
18. 



19. 

20. 



22. 
25. 



27. 
28. 



Dining Hall 
Experiment Sta. 



Dairy Industry 
Physical Education 



21. Walthara *ield Sta. 



Farm 
Roads 



24. 

25. Botany 



4,000 



9,500 

4,000 



2,000 



8,500 
5,000 



A 



ft. 
20,000 

800 



Renew lineoleum floor and 

replace refrigerators 
Completion of Biology Labora- 
tory at Hatch Barn and equip- 
ment . 
Tiling Ice Cream laboratory 
Wire fence with two gates to 
enclose Women's New Athletic 
Field 
Propagation house, head house 
with glass house and heating 
unit for new Nursery Re- 
search Project 
Barn for Herd Sires 
Macademize present dirt sec- 
tion of Lincoln &ve. and 
small dirt section of Olmste 
Drive and improve lighting of 
Lincoln Ave. section, 2,800 
of construction 
To cover extras on 1956 

road project 
Field and laboratory work 
for determination and 
study of shade tree 
diseases and insects, 
including the -^utch 
Elm Disease and its in- 
sect carriers 
Equipment and salaries for 
increase of service under 
Feedstuffs Law to include 
tests for vitamin potency 
and other factors 
For employment of worthy and 

needy students 
To meet emergency needs in 
the harvesting of crops 
or in other ways connec- 
ted with productive or 
control service enter- 
prises 

Total $472,800 



It was 
VOTED : To adopt the budget for special appropria- 
tions as listed above. 

Upon the recommendation of the Committee on 



26. Control 



5,000 



Student Aid 



Emergency 



5,000 
5,000 



4,000 



Finance, it was 



# 




f> 



TRUSTEE 



V 



f> 



797 



THE MASSACHUSETTS AGRICULTURAL COLLEGE 

VOTED : That in recognition of the request to the 
Massachusetts Federation of Poultry Assoc- 
iations that the charge for pullorum 
disease testing be reduced from 7 to 4 
cents, that the fee be reduced to 5 cents. 

Upon the recommendation of the Committee on 

Finance, it was 

VOTED: That in view of the practice which has been 
followed for more than twenty years in 
handling the Cow Test Trust Fund, the ex- 
penditure of the balance of the fund be 
approved as follows: 

For Dairy laboratory refrigerating equip- 
ment $1,605.45 
For Dairy bull, $513.69 ' 
To State Treasurer, $813.11 

This closes out the fund and the work now will 
be carried on an appropriation basis. 

President Baker called the attention of the 
Trustees to the forthcoming meeting of the Association of 
Governing Boards of State Universities and Allied Insti- 
tutions at Lexington, Kentucky on November 12 to 14. 
This College is a member of this Association and was rep- 
resented at the last annual meeting by Trustee Griggs. 
The President pointed out the advantages in having a con- 
tinuity of representation at these meetings and recommend-^ 
ed that Mr. Griggs again be delegated as the representa- 
tive of the Board. Mr. Griggs stated his willingness to 
serve although he asked that he be not considered as a 
permanent delegate and spoke of the advantages in having 
other members attend these meetings from time to time. 
He described the work of the Association and its present 
status. Upon motion duly made and seconded, it was 



Poultry 
Test Fee 



Cow Test 

Fund 

Balance 



Delegate to 
Association 
of Governing 
Boards 



798 



TRUSTEE 



Mr s.St or row* s 
Gift 



Special 

eting of 
Board 



THE MASSACHUSETTS AGRICULTURAL COLLEGE 

VOTED ; To elect Trustee Griggs official delegate 
from this Board to the meeting of the 
Association of Governing Boards of State 
Universities and Allied Institutions to be 
held at Lexington, Kentucky, November IS to 
14, 1956. 

President Baker described the generous gift of 

books, furniture and paintings from Mrs. James J. Storrow 

to the College and upon motion by Mrs. Leach, it was 

VOTED : To extend to Mrs. Storrow a resolution 
of appreciation and sincere thanks for 
this gift. 

Mrs. Leach described briefly the functions of 
the Women's Advisory Council which is active in further- 
ing the development of educational opportunities for 
women at the College. 

Certain special meetings of the Board of 

Trustees have been proposed for the near future including 

a joint meeting with Managers of County Extension Services 

and County Trustees for Aid to Agriculture, and a meeting 

for inspection of the College forest reservation on Mt. 

Toby. President Baker also told of plans for formal 

dedication of the new Women's Play Field in conjunction 

with a meeting of the Women's Advisory Council. Upon his 

recommendation, it was 

VOTED : To hold a special meeting of the Board of 
Trustees on Saturday forenoon, October 24, 
for the inspection of the Mt. Toby reserva- 
tion and to authorize exercises for the 
dedication of the Women's Play Field on 
October 23. 

It was suggested that the President try to make 

arrangements for a joint meeting with County Managers and 
Trustees for Aid to Agriculture some time during November 

or December. 



i* 



" 



*■ 



TRUSTEE 



D 



% 



799 



Recreation 
Conference 
Dates 



Reports by- 
President 



THE MASSACHUSETTS AGRICULTURAL COLLEGE 

The President referred briefly to plans for 
the next annual Recreation Conference and upon his recom- 
mendation, it was 

VOTED : To authorize the dates March 10 to 14, 
1937 for this conference. 

The President gave a brief report on enroll- 
ment data for the current year indicating a slight in- 
crease in student enrollment over last year. 

There was handed to the Trustees, a report on 
the citizenship status of employees, which was a copy of 
report made in response to request from the Commissioner 
of Education forwarding similar request from the Governor 
and Council. 

In answer to question by Mr. Bartlett, the 
President stated that nothing in the budget for the 
current year which has been approved by the Trustees 
commits the Board or the College to continuing procedures 
criticized at recent investigation except as these may 
have been separately considered and approved by the 
Trustees. 

President Baker explained his wish to continue Mrs. Hicks T 

Appointment 
the employment of Mrs. Hicks, Director of Physical Educa- 
tion for Women until the end of the present academic 
year, -i-his is due to the fact that the recent completion 
of the Women T s Play Field makes possible the final 
development of the program which Mrs. Hicks has worked 
upon for so many years and which it would be a decided 






800 



TRUSTEE 



THE MASSACHUSETTS AGRICULTURAL COLLEGE 

detriment to the College to change at this time. Upon 

motion duly made and seconded, it was 

VOTED ; That the services of Mrs, Hicks be con- 
tinued to June 30, 1937 in view of the 
special conditions which have arisen in 
the field of Physical Education for 

Women . 

The meeting adjourned at 11:40 A.M. 



? 



^fZA-tk CuuLt^cJ J tf3tn~rhjTcJL 



Vice- 
President 




1JJLH_$^' Secretary 




# 



r 




TRUSTEE 



♦ 



THE MASSACHUSETTS AGRICULTURAL COLLEGE 

MINUTES OF SPECIAL MEETING OF BOARD OF TRUSTEES 

October 24, 1936, 10:35 A.M., President's Office, Amherst 

PRESENT : Trustees Malcolm, "hitmore, Buttrick, 
Griggs, Mrs. Wilson, Mrs. Leach, 
President Baker, Treasurer Kenney. 

In the absence of Vice-President Bowditch, 

Trustee fthitmore was elected chairman, pro tempore. 

The following is the call for the meeting: 

October 13, 1936 

Board of Trustees 
Massachusetts State College 



At the Special Meeting of the Board held at the 
State House, Boston, September 30, it was voted to hold 
a special meeting on Mount Toby Forest Reservation, seven 
miles north of Amherst, During the forenoon of October 
24th. We are very hopeful that there may be full atten- 
dance of members of the Board as we can assure a most in- 
teresting half day at the Forest. Weather permitting, an 
outdoor forestry luncheon will be served on the Mountain. 



801 



The following recommendation was received from 
the Finance Committee of the Board. "That the special 
trust funds now under the management of the Board and in 
the custody of the Treasurer be turned, over to some Trust 
Company for agency control and investment supervision, 
the Board through appropriate committee, however, not to 
relinquish any Trustee responsibility, but to receive ad- 
vice and information at frequent intervals on investment 
conditions and particularly securities." 

The recommendation seemed to meet with the 

approval of all Trustees present but due to lack of quorum 
no definite action was taken. 



Call 



Trust 
Funds 
Control 



802 



TRUSTEE 



Forest 
Inspection 



THE MASSACHUSETTS AGRICULTURAL COLLEGE 

The meeting was recessed for the purpose of 
making an inspection of the Mt. Toby forest reservation. 

Trustee Monahan attended the inspection of the 
forest which was led by Professor Holdsworth, Head of the 
Department of Forestry, assisted by members of the 
Forestry Department, including Professor Trippensee, 
Assistant Professor ftich, Instructor Curtis, Reservation 
Foreman McCleary. 

Various, areas on the reservation were inspected 
and operations explained by Professor Holdsworth. Lunch- 
eon was served at the farm house on the reservation and 
the meeting adjourned. 



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Vice- 
-President 




ecretary 



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THE MASSACHUSETTS AGRICULTURAL COLLEGE 

MINUTES OF SPECIAL MEETING OF BOARD OF TRUSTEES 

December 4, 1956, 1:00 P.M., Draper Hall, Amherst 

PRESENT : Trustees Bowditch, Bartlett, Griggs, 
Buttrick, ^hitmore, Monahan, Malcolm, 
Chandler, Mrs. Leach, Mrs. Wilson, 
President Baker and Treasurer Kenney. 

Vice-President Bowditch called the meeting to 
order. President Baker stated that the meeting was called 
upon the request of Mr. Bartlett, Chairman of the Finance 
Committee. Mr. Bartlett stated the question had come up 
in regard to advisability of having agency control from 
a National bank or trust company for our trust fund 
securities. Mr. Griggs moved that the Finance Committee 
be authorized to make necessary arrangements with a 
National bank or trust company for handling of our trust 
funds under agency control. Fee to be charged, not to ex- 
ceed "6% gross income, plus necessary incidental expenses. 
carried. 

Moved that we adjourn. Carried. 



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esident 




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e~cretary Jpro 
tern. / 



803 



804 



TRUSTEE 



Call 



Nominating 
Committee 



Committee to 
Wait upon 
Governor 



THE MASSACHUSETTS AGRICULTURAL COLLEGE 

MINUTES OF ANNUAL MEETING OF BOARD OF TRUSTEES 
January IS, 1957, 9:50 A.M., State House, Boston, Mass. 
Vice President Bowditch presiding. 



PRESENT: 



Trustees Bowditch, Griggs, Malcolm, Frost, 
Dewey, Whitmore, Mrs. Wilson, Chandler, 
Cassidy, Commissioner Reardon, Mrs. 
McNamara, Monahan, Buttrick, President 
Baker, Treasurer Kenney. Commissioner 
Murphy was present during the latter part 
of the meeting. 



Following is the call for the meeting. 



December 22, 1956 



Trustees 

Massachusetts State College 



Pursuant to the provisions of the by-laws and 
with the approval of the Vice-President of the Board, the 
annual meeting of the Board of Trustees of the Massachu- 
setts State College is hereby called to convene at the 
State House in Boston at 9:50 A.M., on Wednesday, Janu- 
ary 15, 1957. 

As is the usual custom, this meeting will be 
preceded by meetings of committees on Tuesday, January 
12, in accordance "with the attached schedule. 

Yours respectfully, 

/s/ Robert D. Hawley 
Secretary 

It was 

VOTED : To dispense with the reading of the minutes 
of the last annual meeting. 

The Chairman appointed Trustees Whitmore, 
Chandler and Reardon as a special committee to present 
nominations for officers and committees for the ensuing 
year. 

The Chairman appointed Trustees Malcolm and 
Cassidy as a special committee to wait upon the Governor 



" 



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TRUSTEE 






805 



% 



THE MASSACHUSETTS AGRICULTURAL COLLEGE 

and notify him that the Board of Trustees was in session 

for its annual meeting. 

It was 

VOTED ; That all actions taken by the Committees of 
the Trustees during the year which have not 
been approved subsequently by the Board of 
Trustees be hereby approved. 

Upon the recommendation of the Committee on Ex- 
periment Station, it was 

VOTED : To petition the Legislature that Sections H., Amendment to 



Approval of 

Committee 

Actions 




I,, J. and K of Chapter 274 of the General 
Laws be amended as specified in order to 
definitely affirm in the Law the present 
practice by which the laboratory service un- 
der the Seed Control Law shall be continued 
at the Seed Laboratory at the Massachusetts 
State College. 

Upon the recommendation of the Committee on 

Faculty and Program of Study, it was 

i.. 

VOTED : That a leave of absence for the academic 
year 1937-58 be granted to Assistant Pro- 
fessor Warf el in the Department of Zoology 
in accordance with the professional improve- 
ment plan previously adopted by the Board 
of Trustees. 

Also upon the recommendation of this Committee, 



Seed Law 



Warf el - 
Leave of 
Absence 



it was 



VOTED : That two additional courses - one Field 
Studies in Natural Science and one, 
Dramatic Production, be authorized in 
connection with the training of recrea- 
tional leaders. 

Also upon the recommendation of this Committee, 



it was 



VOTED : That a summer camp in Nature Studies be 

authorized as a part of the Summer School 
program. 



New Courses 



Nature 
Studies Camp 



806 



TRUSTEE 



Dept. of 
Entomology- 
Re-establish- 
ed 



Free In- 
firmary 
Service 



was 



THE MASSACHUSETTS AGRICULTURAL COLLEGE 



Upon the recommendation of this Committee, it 



VOTED : That the Department of Entomology in the 

Division of Physical and Biological Sciences 
be re-established. 



Also upon the recommendation of this Committee, 



it was 



f 



Power Plant 
Addition 



City Club 

Membership 



Investment 

Committee 

Discontinued 



Sale or trans- 
fer of 

Securities 



VOTED : That, in view of the fact that a fee for 
Health Service is included in the tuition 
paid by each student, free bed service in 
the College Infirmary be allowed to each 
student as such Infirmary service may be 
ordered for him by the College Health 
Officer, but not to exceed seven days in any 
one academic year. 

Upon the recommendation of the Committee on 

Buildings and Grounds, it was 

VOTED : That the President be authorized to have 
prepared plans and specifications for in- 
creasing the Power Plant Warehouse to 
accommodate the Grounds Service and for re- 
construction of the present Grounds Service 
building for use as a Physics Laboratory. 

The following actions were taken upon the 

recommendation of the Finance Committee. It was 



VOTED : That the membership of President Baker in the 
Boston City Club, formerly ordered by the 
Trustees, be discontinued. 

It was 

VOTED : That the Special Trustee Committee on Invest- 
ments be discontinued and that the Finance 
Committee of the Board be authorized to carry 
on its functions. 

It was 

VOTED ; That any three members of the Finance Com- 

committee, together with the Treasurer of the 

Board, be authorized to sell, assign, or tran 

sfer any or all bonds and/or stocks now or 
hereafter registered in the name of the 

Massachusetts State College. 



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THE MASSACHUSETTS AGRICULTURAL COLLEGE 

It was 

VOTED : That the trust agreement with the Spring- 
field Safe Deposit and Trust Company be 
approved as submitted. 

It was 

VOTED : That the previous action of the Board by 

which all bonds held by the College a?e re- 
quired to be registered be rescinded. 

It was 

VOTED : That the College subscribe to membership 
in the American Council on Education at a 
cost not to exceed $50.00 per year. 

It was 

VOTED : That the budget of the Federal Bankhead- 

Jones Funds for instruction for the fiscal 
year July 1, 1937 to June 30, 1938 amount- 
ing to $54,646.46 be approved, including 
the new positions recommended by the 
Committee on Faculty and Program of Study. 

Recommendation was received also from the Com- 
mittee on Finance that the comments on the Auditor's Re- 
port made by President Baker and transmitted to each mem- 
ber of the Board by mail, be adopted by the Trustees as a 
statement of fact and policy. There was discussion of 
this recommendation of the Committee following which, it 



807 



Trust 
Agreement 



Bond Registra- 
tion discon- 
tinued 



American 
Council on 
Education - 
Membership 



Bankhead- 

Jones 

Budget 



was 



VOTED : To amend the recommendation of the Com- 
mittee to include the appointment of a 
special committee composed of Trustees 
Bartlett, Bowditch and President Baker 
to confer with the Auditor concerning 
his report upon the accounting activities 
of the College. 

It was 

VOTED : To adopt the recommendation of the Committee 
as amended. 



Auditor's 
Report 



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TRUSTEE 



Treasurer's 

Report 



Home 

Economics 

Instruction 



Attendance of 

Governor 

Hurley 



president f s 

Report 



Report of 

Nominating 

Committee 



THE MASSACHUSETTS AGRICULTURAL COLLEGE 

The report of the Treasurer was received and 
upon the recommendation of the Finance Committee, it was 
VOTED : To adopt the Treasurer's report. 

The Secretary presented a brief summary of the 
status of the budget of the College for the current year. 

Commissioner Reardon stated his belief that the 

College is unnecessarily duplicating instruction in the 

field of Home Economics carried on by the Framingham 

State Teachers College. There was discussion of this 
matter, but no action was taken. 

At this point the special committee appointed 
to wait upon the Governor introduced His Excellency who 
called upon the President for specific information con- 
cerning the College, its students, faculty and finances. 
His Excellency expressed his wish to have Dean Henry W. 
Holmes of Harvard University make a study of the work of 
the College and President Baker replied that he would be 
very happy to have Dean Holmes make such a study. After 
a brief visit the Governor left the meeting. 

President Baker presented his annual report and, 
it was 

VOTED : That the report be accepted. 

The Committee on nominations presented its re- 
port recommending officers and committees of the Board 
for the ensuing year. The Secretary was instructed to 
cast one ballot by which it was unanimously 

VOTED : To elect the following officers and 

Committees of the Board of Trustees for 
the ensuing year. 



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THE MASSACHUSETTS AGRICULTURAL COLLEGE 

President - His Excellency, Charles F. Hurley 
Vice-President - Nathaniel I. Bowditch 
Secretary - Robert D. Hawley 
Treasurer - Fred C. Kenney 

STANDING COMMITTEES OF THE 
BOARD OF TRUSTEES 

Year 1937 

Committ ee on Facul ty and Program of Study 

Mrs 



Davis R. Dewey, Chairman 
John F. Gannon 
Frederick D. Griggs 
John Chandler 



Elizabeth L. Mc 
Namara 
David J. Malcolm 
James G. Reardon 



Committee on Extension Service 



John Chandler, Chairman 

Davis R. Dewey 

John F. Gannon 

Mrs, Eliz. l. McNamara 



William C. Monahan 
Mr s.Lena Edge Wilson 
James G. Reardon 
Frederick D. Griggs 



Committee on Agricultu re 

■^ — MW Ml, ■ i. ■ Ml ^ ■■ BJ mt—^^BS* ^i»^>i>« .. ■ ■ -sMW — p— 

William C. Monahan, Chairman Mrs. Lena Edge Wilson 
David J. Malcolm Howard Haines Murphy 

Harold L. F r0 st 

Committee on Experiment Station 



David H. But trick, Chairman 
Howard Haines Murphy 
Harold L. Frost 



David J. Malcolm 
Mrs.Eliz.L. McNamara 
Philip F. Whitmore 



Committee on Horticulture 



Harold k. Frost, Chairman 
William C. Monahan 



Howard Haines Murphy 
Mrs.Eliz. L. McNamara 



Committee on Buildings and Gr ounds 

—uni— ii ■ * ■in— iii ■ m o y i n ■ ii m m B I t miiw iiimi m n m ■ m ■■■■i— ■— 

Philip F.Whitmore, Chairman Mrs. Lena Edge Wilson 
David H. Buttrick David J. Malcolm 

James T # Cassidy 

Committee o n Finance 

mjpm— '■ ii ii ■ r ■■> ■ ■' -Mi i c "m=^— «*i-'-— — ■ m mm- 

Joseph ^. Bar tlett, Chairman Harold L. Frost 
John Chandler David H. Buttrick 

Philip F. Whitmore 



809 



Election of 
Officers 



810 



TRUSTEE 



THE MASSACHUSETTS AGRICULTURAL COLLEGE 

Committe e on Legislation 

Frederick D.Griggs, Chairman Joseph W. Bar tie tt 

James T. Cassidy 

Executi ve Com mittee 

Nathaniel I. Bowdi ten, Chairman Philip F. Whitmore 

Joseph I. Bartlett 

The President of the College and the Vice- 
President of the Board are ex-officio members of each 



committee. 



The meeting adjourned at 12:30 P.M. 



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President 



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811 



THE MASSACHUSETTS AGRICULTURAL COLLEGE 

January 15, 1937 

ACTION OF EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE OF BOARD OF TRUSTEES 

Messrs: Bowditch, Whitmore, Bartlett, Baker. 

Whereas the administration of the Massachusetts State 
College under its Board of Trustees and Execu- 
tive Officers has been charged publicly with 
improper management of the Institution; and 

Whereas it is the firm opinion of said Trustees and 
said officers that the affairs of the College 
have been administered efficiently and in the 
best interests of the Commonwealth; and 

Whereas it is the earnest wish of the Trustees and 
administrative officers of the College that a 
full and thorough knowledge of the work and 
methods of the Institution be available to 
officers of the Commonwealth and to the public 
generally; it is therefore 

Resolved: That an investigation of the work and 

methods of the College by Dean Henry W. Holmes 
of Harvard University, as suggested by His 
Excellency, Charles F. Hurley, Governor of the 
Commonwealth, is earnestly requested. 



1 



812 



TRUSTEE 



Call 



THE MASSACHUSETTS AGRICULTURAL COLLEGE 

MINUTES OF SPECIAL MEETING OF BOARD OF TRUSTEES 

May 20, 1937, Amherst, Massachusetts 

PRESENT ; Trustees Bowditch, Bartlett, Malcolm, 
Cassidy, Monahan, Chandler, Griggs, 
Whitmore, Buttrick, Frost, Mrs, McNamara, 
President Baker. 

Following an informal assembly of the Trustees 
at the Presidents Office, the Board attended the student 
Convocation at Bowker Auditorium at 11 o'clock at which 
Professor Frank Prentice Rand spoke upon the subject 
"Not Excluding Classical Studies." 

Following Convocation, the Trustees lunched v/ith 
members of the President's Cabinet at Draper Hall, after 
which there was a brief inspection of the reconstructed 
College Chapel and the special meeting of the Board was 

convened at the President's Office at 2:00 P.M. 

Chairman, Trustee Bowditch. 

Following is the call for the meeting. 

April 30, 1937 

To Board of Trustees 
Massachusetts State College 

In accordance with the provisions of 
the By-Laws and upon v/ritten request from three 
Trustees, a special meeting of the Board is 
hereby called to convene at the President's 
Office at Amherst at 10:30 A.M. Thursday, 
May 20, 1937. The purpose of this meeting will 
be to attend the special Trustee Convocation 
at 11 o'clock, luncheon at Draper Hall at 12 
o'clock followed by a formal business meeting 
for consideration of the following matters. 

Financial report and trust funds invest- 
ment and management. 






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813 


THE MASSACHUSETTS AGRICULTURAL COLLEGE 




Buildings and grounds improvements and 
the granting of an option* 




Personnel matters. 


m 


Faculty recommendations regarding Course of 
Study. 




Yours respectfully, 




/s/ Robert D. Hawley 
Secretary 




It was 





VOTED : To dispense with the reading of the minutes 
of the preceding meeting. 

The minutes of the meetings of the Executive 

Committee of March 10 and April 22, 1937 were read and 

consideration given to the various recommendations from 

that committee. It was 

VOTED ; To approve the action of the Executive 

Committee with regard to room rentals in 
College owned houses, which houses are 
supplied employees as perquisites to 
salaries, and for the future not to per- 
mit rental of such rooms for cash except as 
payment is made to the Treasurer of the 
College for transfer to the State Treasury. 

It was 

VOTED : That no action be taken regarding a break- 
age deposit fee for residents of College 
dormitories. 

Consideration was given to the recommendation 
of President Baker regarding legislative status of re- 
volving fund enterprises, which recommendation was trans- 
mitted to the Full Board by the Executive Committee with- 
out recommendation by the Committee. The President had 
recommended that the Trustees secure, if possible, the 

passage of a clarifying amendment to Chapter 75 of the 
General Laws in the Legislature convening January 1,1938, 



Minutes 



Room 
Rentals 



Breakage 
Deposit 



-— — - -. - 

814 








THE MASSACHUSETTS AGRICULTURAL COLLEGE 


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TRUSTEE 


which will give specific authority to the Board of 
Trustees of the College to use as revolving funds re- 






ceipts from such enterprises as the Dining Hall, Book- 






store, Academic Activities, Athletic Activities, etc. 






It was pointed out that this recommendation is made be- 






cause of the criticism of the Auditor that the present 






laws are not sufficient to authorize the Trustees to con- 






duct these enterprises. The Trustees have authorized the 






operation of these enterprises for many years in the be- 
lief that Chapter 75 does given to 1hem authority for such 






procedure. Following full consideration of the matter, 






it was 




Revolving 

Fund 

Enterprises 


VOTED: To adopt the recommendation of the President 
and to take steps to secure, if possible, a 
clarifying amendment to Chapter 75 of the 
General Laws which will give specific 
authority to the Board of Trustees of the 
College to use as revolving funds receipts 
from such enterprises as fining Hall, Book- 
store, Academic Activities, Athletic 
Activities, etc. 

Following usual procedure, it was 


* 


Executive 
Committee 
Actions 


VOTED: To approve actions of the Executive Committee 
at its meetings on March 10 and April 22, 
1957 not already acted upon separately by the 
Board of Trustees. 






A brief financial report was presented by the 

i 

Treasurer. 

Upon the recommendation of the Treasurer and in 
line with the policy adopted by the Trustees at the last 
annual meeting, it was 


i 

i 


— 


■ 





COMMITTEE 



THE MASSACHUSETTS AGRICULTURAL COLLEGE 



VOTE D; That the following bonds owned by and 

either partially or fully registered in 
the name of the College be transferred 
and changed into fully unregistered coupon 
bearing bonds. 



5^s 
5§s 



June 
Nov. 



1949 
1952 



4s Feb. 1998 

Dec. 1954 

1st lien & ref . 



%15 



$1000. Cities Service Power & Light deb. 
5000. Cities Service Power & Light deb. 
5000. Florida Power & Light 1st 5s June 1954 
1000. Gatineau Power 1st 5s June 1956 
6000. Illinois Power & Light 1st 6s Apr. 1955 
5000. Illinois Power & Light 1st & ref."B" 5js Dec. 1954 
4000. Illinois Power & Light 1st & ref.»C" 5s Dec. 1956 
1500. Indiana Hydro-Elec. Power 1st 5s May 1958 
5000. Indianapolis Water Works Securities Co. Sec. 5s 

Jan. 1958 
1000. New York Central cons. mtg. 
5000. New England Power Assn. 5is 
4000. Northern New York Utilities 1st lien & ref. 6s 

May 1945 
2000. Prudence Bonds 1st mtg. coll. 5js Mar. 1955 
5000. Puget Sound Power 8; Light 1st & ref. 5|s June 1949 
10000. Scranton-Spring Brook Water Service 1st mtg. & ref. 

5s Aug. 1967 
5000. Texas Electric Service 1st 5s July 1960 
1000. Toledo Edison 1st 5s Nov. 1962 
1000. Union Elec. Light & Power Co. gen. mtg. 5s Apr. 

1957 
10000. U. S. Treasury 5 l/8s June 15, 1949/6 
4000. Wichita Water Co. 1st 5s Nov. 1960 
2400. Columbus Venetian Stevens Bldgs. 1st. mtg. income 

bonds Sept. 1955. 

and that the Treasurer, Fred C. Kenney, is 
hereby authorized and empowered in the name 
and behalf of the College to execute and de- 
liver all assignments, orders, transfers, 
and other instruments necessary in his judg- 
ment to carry out ihe purposes of this vote. 

It was 

VOTED : That the Treasurer be and hereby is author- 
ized to sell and transfer from time to time 
any and all bond stocks and other securities 
owned by or standing in the name of the 
College upon the recommendation of the 
Finance Committee and with the written 
approval of a majority of the Board of 
Trustees and to execute and deliver in the 
name of and on behalf of the College all 
transfers, assignments or other instruments 
necessary in his judgment to carry out the 
purposes of this vote. 



Bonds 
Transfer 



Securities 
Sale 



me 


— i 






THE MASSACHUSETTS AGRICULTURAL COLLEGE 


^ 


COMM*^ 


It was 




Trust Fund 
Agent 


VOTED: That the Treasurer of the College is hereby 
authorized and empowered in the name of and 
on behalf of the College to execute power of 
attorney authorizing the Springfield Safe 
Deposit and Trust Company to receive checks 
covering the interest on 5 1/8$ Treasury 
bond of 1949/6 for $10,000. 






Upon the recommendation of the Finance Committee 


t 




it was 




Brown Company 
Bonds 


VOTED: To authorize the Treasurer to sell bonds of 
the Brown Company held by the College. 

Report was received concerning State appropria- 
tions for maintenance for the current year. 
It was 




Student Aid 
F^nd 


VOTED: To authorize the President to expend the 

special appropriation of |5,000 for aid to 
certain students during the year 1936-37. 

It was 


*> 


Gift for 4-H 
Building 


VOTED: To accept with appreciation the gift of $500 
from the Massachusetts Society for the Pro- 
motion of Agriculture to the fund for the 
construction of the second 4-H Club house on 
the Campus. 


■ 


Senior Class 
Gift 


The gift of two large elm trees placed in front 
of Goodell Library by the Class of 1937 was accepted with 
appreciation. 

President Baker reported that pursuant to in- 
structions from the Trustee Committee on Buildings and 
Grounds with regard to request for option on lot by Lambda 




- 


Chi Alpha fraternity, he had carried on negotiations with 
representatives of the fraternity which had resulted in 






their transferring their request for option on a building 


^ 




lot from lot north of the College Inn to a lot at the 





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817 



THE MASSACHUSETTS AGRICULTURAL COLLEGE 

corner of Pleasant Street and Butterfield Terrace equal 

in area. Upon his recommendation, it was 

VOTED: To grant to the Lambda Chi Alpha fraternity 
option on lot at the corner of Butterfield 
Terrace and Pleasant Street for a period of 
one year — sale price $1,000. 

At this point, it was necessary for Trustee 
Bowditch to leave the meeting and Trustee Frost was 
elected acting chairman in his place. 

The resignation of Mrs. Adeline E. Hicks, Head 

of the Department of Physical Education for Y/omen, was 

received, to be effective June 30, 1937 and in accepting 

this resignation the following resolution was adopted by 

the Board. 

The Trustees accept with deep regret the resignation 
of Mrs. Adeline E. Hicks as Head of the Department of 
Physical Education for Women, who completes in June, twen- 
ty years of significant service to Physical Education in 
general and to the women students of the State College in 
particular. 

From 1917 until the renovation which made the Drill 
Hall into the women 1 s gymnasium in 1931, Mrs. Hicks 
struggled through 14 years of real pioneer work in her 
field of Physical Education and Recreation for women. 
Continually faced with inadequate facilities, sans dress- 
ing rooms, showers and floor space, shunted from building 
to building, her constructive program was gradually 
developed under the most trying conditions. 

In 1921 Mrs. Hicks 1 guidance was recognized by 
faculty standing. In 1927 she was invited to serve as 
Physical Director for Women. By 1931 Mrs. Hicks had 
developed a Physical Education program comparable to the 
programs in the Women's Colleges. 

The dedication of the new Athletic Field for Women 
last October was a fitting tribute to Mrs. Hicks' two 
decades of consecrated service. It is partictilarly 
significant to note that when the College was able to 
present the girls with adequate facilities, Mrs. Hicks 
had a complete program in readiness. 



Option to 
Lambda Chi 
Alpha 



Mrs. Hicks 1 
Resignation 



SI8 



gOMMITTCE- 



Appointments 



Promotions 



THE MASSACHUSETTS AGRICULTURAL COLLEGE 



Ever interested in the health and happiness of each 
individual girl, this many faceted Director of Physical 
Education has for five college generations improved the 
standards of play and games, the posture, charm, and 
poise of State College women. 

With the entrance of the modern dance into the field 
of art and education, Mrs. Hicks after making a special 
study of this new phase introduced her course in the 
modern dance. Not only have our women students derived 
satisfaction from learning to express themselves through 
this medium, but many College audiences have been delight- 
ed at presentations by Mrs. Hicks and her Dance Group. 

In view of Mrs. Hicks* long and distinguished ser- 
vice to the College, to its women students and to Physical 
Education for women; it is hereby resolved that a copy of 
this tribute to a devotee of a cause, to a forv/ard-looking 
administrator, to an expert technician and artist in her 
own right and to an indefatigable worker, be inscribed 
upon the records of this Board and that copies of same be 
sent to the Collegian, to the Alumni Bulletin and to Mrs. 
Hicks. 

The following appointments were reported by the 

President: 

Dr. Carl Olson, Jr., to be Research Professor of Veterin- 
ary Science at the salary of |3600 per year, effective 
June 1, 1937. 

Dr. William G. Vinal to be Professor of Nature Education 
at the salary of 13480 per year, effective July 1, 1937. 

It was 

VOTED; To confirm the appointments of Dr. Olson 

and Dr. Vinal as reported by the President. 

The President recommended, the reclassif- 
ication of six positions in the teaching staff of the 
College as follows: 

1. R. H. Barrett, Assistant Professor of Farm Manage- 
ment, to be Professor of Agricultural Economics and 
Farm Management at the salary rate of $3480. 

2. C. F. Fraker, Assistant Professor of Modern Languages, 
to be Associate Professor of Modern Languages at the 
salary rate of $2760. 



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6. 



THE MASSACHUSETTS AGRICULTURAL COLLEGE 

S. C. Goding, Assistant Professor of French and Music, 
to be Associate Professor of French and Music at the 
salary rate of $2880. 

G. A. Marston, Instructor in Mathematics, to be 
Assistant Professor of Mathematics at the salary rate 
of |2220. 

R. C. Packard, Vocational Instructor in Bacteriology, 
to be Assistant Professor of Bacteriology at the 
salary rate of $2580. 

R. E. Torrey, Associate Professor of Botany, to be 
Professor of Botany at the salary rate of $5720. 

It was 

VOTED: To approve the recommendations of the Presi- 
dent for reclassification of positions as 
listed above and to authorize him to present 
these recommendations to the State Director 
of Personnel. 

Upon the recommendation of the President, it was 

VOTED ; To authorize the establishment of a new 

position, Assistant Professor of Political 
Economy, at the salary rate of $2220 effec- 
tive July 1, 1957, salary to be paid from 
increased appropriations of Federal Bank- 
head-Jones funds. 

It was reported that in accordance with the pro- 
visions of the State classified service and pursuant to 
provisions of the budget authorized by the Board of 
Trustees, the President has recommended step increases in 
salary for certain members of the staff of the College. 
Some modification of the increases recommended in last 
fall's budget have seemed advisable to the Administration 
in view of changes in service and personnel since that 
time, but in general the recommendations included in the 
budget have been followed. Complete lists of increases 
as recommended to the Division of Personnel and Standardi- 
zation are available to any Trustee who desires them. 



i 



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New Position 



Salary 
Increases 



po 



Graduation 
Requirements 



New Courses 



THE MASSACHUSETTS AGRICULTURAL COLLEGE 

c o mm i ttee Report was received from the Faculty Committee 

on Course of Study recommending certain changes in method 
of specialization for the junior and senior years and 
further recommending reductions in junior and senior 
credit requirements for graduation from 72 to 60 credits. 

The report of the Faculty Committee had been ex- 
plained in considerable detail by Dean ^achmer at the 
luncheon meeting of the Board and upon motion duly made 
and seconded, it was 

VOTED: To adopt the recommendation of the Committee. 

Recommendation was also received from the 
Faculty Committee on Course of Study for the adoption of 
certain new courses. It was felt by some members of the 
Board that this recommendation should be studied by the 
Trustee Committee on Program of Study before being acted 
upon by the Board and in view of the wish of the president 
and the faculty that some of the recoiumended courses be 
considered so that if approved they might be available 
for student election next fall, it was 



VOTED : To refer the recommendation to the Trustee 
Committee on Faculty and Program of Study 
with power. 

Report was received from a special committee of 

the faculty with recommendation for the approval of the 

organization of a course of study for hotel workers in the 

Stockbridge School of Agriculture. In view of the report 

of the Director of the Stockbridge School, Mr. Verbeck, 

presented at the luncheon meeting of the Trustees in which 

he raised question as to availability of adequate 



* 



^ 



<^jfe 



• 



TRUSTEE 



♦ 



C 




THE MASSACHUSETTS AGRICULTURAL COLLEGE 

facilities for such a course, it was 

VOTED : To lay the recommendation on trie table. 

President Baker pointed out that the above com- 
pleted the consideration of matters included in the call 
for the meeting but that tnere were two items of un- 
finished business which the Trustees might consider if 
they see fit. One was his recommendation that the 
Trustees authorize the granting of the B.S. degree 
honoris causa to old students who have completed at 
least two years of satisfactory study at the College 
and who have had twenty years or more of successful 
practice or service since leaving the College. The 
other matter was the petition from certain student or- 
ganizations for the granting of the A.B. degree by the 
College. 

It was 

VOTED : To refer the recommendation of the 
President regarding the granting of 
the B.S. degree, honoris causa, to 
the Trustee Committee on Faculty and 
Program of Study. 



Following discussion of the student petition, 



it was 



VOTED : That the petition be received and be- 
cause of the wish of the Trustees to 
become thoroughly acquainted with all 
factors involved, it be referred to 
the Trustee Committee on Faculty and 
Program of Study for investigation 
and report to the Board at the annual 
meeting in 1338. 

The meeting adjourned at 4:15 P.M. 



President 



82/ 



Hotel Workers 
Course 



B.S. Degree 
Honoris Causa 



A.B. Degree 

Student 

Petition 



oZb 



TRUSTEE 



Call 



Minutes 



THE MASSACHUSETTS AGRICULTURAL COLLEGE 

MINUTES OF SEMI-ANNUAL MEETING OF BOARD OF TRUSTEES 

June 14, 1937, 11:00 A.M., President's Office, Amherst 

Chairman, Trustee Bowditch 

PRESENT : Trustees Bowditch, Frost, 

Mrs. Wilson, Buttrick, Malcolm, 
Griggs, Monahan, Chandler, 
Whitmore, President Baker. 
Commissioner Reardon attended 
the latter part of the meeting. 

The following is the call for the meeting. 

June 2, 1957 

To Board of Trustees 
Massachusetts State College 

In accordance with the provisions of 
the By-Laws, the Semi -Annual Meeting of 
the Board of Trustees is hereby called to 
convene at the President's Office at 
Amherst on Monday, June 14, 1937 at 11:00 
a. LI. The purpose of this meeting vd.ll "be 
to act upon the recommendations of the 
faculty concerning degrees and to consider 
such other business as properly may be 
presented. 

Yours respectfully, 

/s/ Robert D. Hawley 
Secretary 

It was 

VOTED : To dispense with the reading of the 
minutes of the preceding meeting. 

Reference was made to the minutes of the meet- 
ing of the Trustee Committee on Finance of May 28, 1937 
and one change in these minutes was noted which change 
had reference to the action of the committee in appro- 
priating income from the Burnham, Wheeler and Sessions 
Funds for use during the period from May to the next 
annual meeting of the Board. It was 



C 



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TRUSTEE 



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♦ 



THE MASSACHUSETTS AGRICULTURAL COLLEGE 

VOTED ; To approve the actions of the Finance 
Committee as recorded in the minutes 
of the meeting of May 28. 

The minutes of the meeting of the Trustee 

Committee on Faculty and Program of Study for May 28, 

1937 were read and, it was 

VOTED: To approve the actions of this Committee 
as recorded in tuese minutes. 

The Secretary presented the recommendation of 
the Faculty that the degree Bachelor of Science be con- 
ferred upon the following 229 candidates of the class of 
1937. 

Summa Cum Laude 
Roger Kingman Pratt, Jr. Albert Stetson Thomas 

Magna Cum Laude 



Richard Clancy Desmond 

Shirley Gale 

Samuel Raymond Klibanof f 

Cum Laude 

John F. Appel 

Earbara Ruth Clark 

Melvin Irving Cohen 

Anthony Patrick Ferrucci, Jr. 

Barbara Knox Keck 

Morris Wolfe Lerner 

Leo David Lipman 






823 



Committee 
Actions 



Rite 



Ralph Emerson Aiken, Jr. 

Charles F. Appel 

Rpse Jane Ash 

Barbara Edwards Baggs 

Dorothy Ballard 

Lois Brewster Barnes 

Isadore Barr 

Alfred "'alter Basamania 

Charles Benea 

Nathan Milton Berman 

Edwin George Bernstein 



George McLean Milne 
Milton Silverman 
Carl Pontius Swanson 



Isadore Ludwin 
Lucille Amelia Monroe 
William Henry Moss 
Harold Anthony Sleeper 
Frances Elizabeth Stepath 
Myron Albert Widland 
Sidney Williams 



Franklyn Doane Berry 
Alice Barlow Bevington 
Robert Anthony Bieber 
Ernest Leslie Birdsall 
Catherine Martha Birnie 
Leroy Lewis Blackmer, Jr. 
Ruth Blassberg 
Sheldon Pratt Bliss 
Paul Frederick Bobula 
Richard Oscar Bohm 
Horace " r infieid Bolton 



8&4 



TRUSTEE 



THE MASSACHUSETTS AGRICULTURAL COLLEGE 



Louis Bongiolatti, Jr. 
Mary Elizabeth Boucher 
Alma Ruth Boyden 
Priscilla Marie Bradford 
Louis Adela 



Russell Thompson Graves 
Guy Manning Gray, Jr. 
Albert Joseph Gricius 
Sandra Gulben 



rd Breault, Jr. Walter Charles Guralnick 
Mary Rebecca Breinig Elmer Winston Hallowell 
John Poor Brooks John Francis Hanson 
Lucille Constance Brouille^rving Douglas Hardy 
Dorothy Imogene Brown Lawrence Keith Harris 
Alfred Washburn Bruneau . Raymond Lewis Hart 
Francis Campbell Burke Forrest Dana Hartin 
Malcolm Suffolk Butler Emily Madeline Healey 
Norman Wesley Butterfield ^ enn ?th Raymond Higgins 
John Joseph Byrnes 



Marjorie Grant Cain 
Muriel Elizabeth Cain 
Margaret Calkins 
Webster Alien Chandler 
Barbara May Clark 
Leroy French Clark, Jr. 
Virginia Justine Conner 
Raymond Francis Conway 
Louis Elias Cosmos 
Robert Emmet Couhig 
Clayton Chester Craft 
■"eo Vincent Crowley 
Francis Elliott Cushman 
James Frederick Cutter 
Ernest Kirk Davis 
Frederick Leroy Davis 
Henry George Dihlmann 
James JackDobby 
Elizabeth Louise Dodge 



Merrill Spinney Hobart 
Walter James H odder 
Robert Powell H61ds\Yorth, 
Sarah Huntington Hopkins 
Harlan Arnold Howard 
Henry Nicholas iacovelli 
Allan Southworth Ingalls 
Kenneth Colwell Irvine 
Byron Taylor Johnson 
Harry Agnew Johnson 
Lawrence Sterling Johnson 
William Vialle Johnson 
Raymond Benedict Jordan 
Dorothy Mary Joyce 
John Kabat 

Robert Alexander Keefe 
Joseph George Kennedy 
William Frank Kewer 
Ruth Kinsman 
Richard Berry Knov/lton 
Harry Fredrick Koch 



Jr 



Trento Joseph Domenici 

Dorothea Margaret Donnelly Rudolph William Kuc 
Helen Anna Downing Henry Shoub Kushlan 
Howard Bernard Driscoll Laurence Harwood Kyle 
Esther Mae Dunphy ^ohn Edward Landers 
Moses Jacob Entin Dorothy Elizabeth Lannon 
Charles Edgar Eshbacn, Jr.Wendel Laphari 
Alburn Lasell Fargo 



Ed son John Ferrell 
Angela Mary Filios 
Austin Wellington Fisher, 
Robert Bernard Fisher 
Edward Michael Flavin 
Joseph Freedman 
Hillel Henry Friedman 
Lois Isabelle Fun 
Ralph Bailey Gates 
Murray Winter George 
Phyllis Ann Gleason 
Sylvia Shirley Goldsmith 
Frederick Wells Goodhue 
Barbara Rarnona Gordon 



Philip Duma r esq Lay ton 
William Ames Leighton, Jr. 
Sidney Liberfarb 
J^x Lilly 

Katharine Louise Machmer 
Thomas' Joseph Maguire 
Emil Marciniak 
Helena Clare McMahon 
*homas Francis McMahon, Jr. 
Edmund James McNally, Jr. 
John Edmund McMally 
Charles Harold Meyers 
Ivan Charles Minott, Jr. 
Raymond Arthur Minzner 
Gordon Moody 



Estella Caroline Goulding Joy Emma Moore 

Norman Wallace Grant Walter Benjamin Moseley 



€ 



t 



♦ 



TRUSTEE 



♦ 



i) 



THE MASSACHUSETTS AGRICULTURAL COLLEGE 



w illard Squier Munson 
Frederick Joseph Murphy 
Elliott Houghton Newcomb 
Anthony Joseph Nogelo 
Joseph Conrad Nowakowski 
George Edward O'Brien 
Aniela Mary Okolo 
Lemuel Osborne, Jr. 
Robert Bishop Peckham 
Robert Charles Perriello 
David Allen Peterson 
James Aaron Pickering 
Alfred Herbert Planting 
Edith Evelyn Priest 
Rita Agnes Provost 
William Augustus Raynes, Jr. 
Lee T "ilson Rice, Jr. 
Prescott Langdon Richards 
George Robert Richason, Jr. 
Maida Leonard Riggs 
Louis Everett Roberts 
Caroline Rita Rogers 
Paul Hubbard Rosberry 
Kenwood Ross 

David Patrick Rossiter, Jr. 
John Ruff ley, Jr. 
James Marcus Ryan 
Robert Ryer, III 
Charles Leonard SanClemente 
Gladys Caroline Sawinski 
Stanley Francis Seperski 
Norman Louis Sheffield 
Philip Burrill Shiff 
Walter Simons en 
Saul Small 

John William 

It was 



Esther 
Philip 
Robert 
Elinor 
Edward 



8M 



Elizabeth Smith 
James Spear 
LeRoy Spiller, Jr. 
Leola Stone 
Parsons Swan, Jr. 

Clifford Ernest Symancyk 

John Joseph Talinski 

Edward Jesse Thacker 

Francis Joseph Thomas 

Robert William Thorndike 

Donald Frederick Thurlow 

Ruth Elizabeth Todt 

Everett Lawe Trombly 

Haskell Solomon Tubiash 

Donald Kent Tucker 

Harvey Gay Turner, Jr. 

John Albert Tuttle 

James Saul Waldman 

Helen May Warner 

Louise Isabel Warner 

Harold Irving Watts 

Beatrice Rivoli Waxier 

Donald Edward '"eaver 

Eleanor Alice West 

Edith Lillian Whitmore 

Ira Bertram Whitney 

Frederick Winsor Whittemore, Jr 

Sarah Clark Wilcox 

Marian Kay Wingate 

Frederick Joseph Wishart, Jr. 

Karol Stanley Wisnieski 

Judith Gail Wood 

Ruth Elizabeth T "ood 

Raymond Wyman 

Arthur Jacob Zuckerman 

Zukel 



VOTED : To authorize the President of the College 
to confer the degree Bachelor of Science 
upon the candidates of the class of 1937 
as listed above. 

Upon the recommendation of the Faculty, it was 

VOTED: To authorize the President to confer the 
degree Bachelor of Vocational Agriculture 
upon Walter Fredric Lewis and Henry James 
Sampson of the class of 1937. 



Degrees 
Authori, 



;ed 



82* 



TRUSTEE 






THE MASSACHUSETTS AGRICULTURAL COLLEGE 

Upon the recommendation of the Faculty, it was 

VOTED: To authorize the President to confer 
the degree Bachelor of Landscape 
Architecture upon Carl Steffens Gerlach, 
Dean Newton Click anu Charles Ewald 
Meyers. 

Recommendation was received from the Faculty of 

the Graduate School that the degree Master of Science be 

conferred upon the following 48 candidates: 



€ 



Harry Anthony Barnicle 
Roland Frederick Becker 
William Bernard Becker 
George Maurice Bernique 
John William Bernotavicz 
Amedeo Bondi, Jr. 
Marguerite Marilynn Bouregeois 
Cornelius Kennady Cain 
Calton Oliver Cartwright 
Robert Adams Caughey 
George Steadman Congdon 
'j-homas Francis Coughlin 
Chester Ellsworth Cross 
Augustino Dominic D f Ercole 
Domenic DeFelice 
Gordon Bowman Dennis 
Louis Michael DiCarlo 
Clyde Walton Dow 
Carl Frederick Dunker 
Carl Arthur Fraser 
James Francis Gallant 
Myer Glickstein 
Harry Kydd Gouck, Jr. 
Edward Win slow Harvey 

It was 



Herbert Jenkins 
Eunice Moore Johnson 
Isaac Klein 
Karol Kucinski 
Lester Henry Levine 
Walter Francis Mc Andrews 
Edward Meyer 
Carroll Percival Moore 
George Edward Hettleton, 2nd 
Samuel T-Teuman 
Kenneth Raycrof t Newman 
Alfred Eastman Newton 
George Raymond Pease 
Daniel Clayton plastridge 
Ruth Pus nee 
Jeanette Marie Roney 
Thomas Joseph Savaria 
Kevin Griffin Shea 
Chester Williams Smith 
Carlton Mclntyre Stearns 
Roy Moore S telle 
kelson Pierce Stevens 
Robert Carl Tetro 
Howard Thomas 




VOTED : To authorize the President of the College 
to confer the degree Master of Science 
upon the 48 candidates listed above. 

Upon the recommendation of the Faculty of the 

Graduate School, it was 

VOTED: To authorize the president to confer the 
degree Doctor of Philosophy upon George 
ChaDman Crooks and Richard Thomas Holway. 




TRUSTEE 



% 



I 



THE MASSACHUSETTS AGRICULTURAL COLLEGE 

President Baker presented recommendations for 

appointment to six vacant positions in the professional 

staff as follows: 

Dr. Margaret Thoroman of Belmont 
Hospital, Worcester, Massachusetts, to be 
Assistant Professor of Hygiene in the posi- 
tion vacated by Dr. Jenney, appointment to 
be effective September 1, 1937 at the 
salary rate of $2220. Dr. Thoroman has the 
A.B. degree from the University of Indiana 
and the M.D. from the Medical School of the 
same University. She has had approximately 
four years experience in nursing and 
medical service. 

Miss Mary B. Davie s to be Physical 
Director for Women in the position vacated 
by the resignation of Mrs. Hicks, appoint- 
ment to be effective September 1, 1957, at 
the salary rate of $2500. Miss Davies has 
a Bachelor^ degree from wheaton College 
and a Master T s degree in Physical Education 
from Welle sley. She was formerly instructor 
in Physical Education at Mount Holyoke 
College and at present is head of the de- 
partment of Physical Education for Women 
at the Wisconsin State Teachers College. 
Her .present salary is $2400 and it is her 
desire to return to Massachusetts which 
makes this position attractive to her. 

Dr. Charles H. fiohr, to be Assistant 
Professor of Political Economy, at the 
salary rate of $2220 beginning July 1, 1937. 
Dr. Rohr has the degree Doctor of 
Philosophy from Johns Hopkins University 
and has had teaching experience at the 
University of Baltimore « Trinity College 
and the University of Maine. 

Mrs. Gladys Cook to be Instructor in 
Home Economics at the salary rate of $1620 
effective September 1, 1957. Mrs. Cook 
is a widow, has a Master* s degree from 
this College and has served as assistant 
in the Experiment Station, Home Economics 
Department during the past year. 






8^7 



Appointments 



SZB 



TRUSTEE 



THE MASSACHUSETTS AGRICULTURAL COLLEGE 

Mr. Frederick S. Troy to be Assistant 
Professor of English at the salary rate of 
$2220, effective September 1, 1957. Mr. 
Troy has the degree M.A., has served as 
Instructor in this College since 1951. 

Dr. Charles P. Alexander to be Acting 
Head of the Department of Entomology, 
effective July 1, 1957 at no change in 
salary. Dr. Alexander has been a member of 
the faculty of the College since 1922 and 
has been Professor of Entomology since 1950 
and is the logical person to serve as Head 
of this Department reestablished by the 
Trustees at the last annual meeting. 

Following consideration of the recommendation 

of the President as described above, it was 

VOTED: To confirm the six appointments as 
recommended. 

Some time following the above recorded action 

of the Trustees regarding personnel appointments, 

Commissioner Reardcn attended the meeting and in 

connection with Miss Davies* appointment explained his 

attitude and that of the Governor's with regard to the 

employment of oersons not resident in Massachusetts. In 

reply, President Baker pointed out that an extensive 

search had been made in Massachusetts to find a qualified 

candidate for trie position. He explained the need for a 

person with college training and teaching experience to 

head up the work of the department and also pointed out 

that Miss Davies is a former resident of the state, 

trained in Massac nusetts institutions. Dr. Reardon asked 

that he be recorded in the negative on the vote approving 

Miss Davies f appointment. 



t 



TRUSTEE 



829 



THE MASSACHUSETTS AGRICULTURAL COLLEGE 

The following resignation from Mrs. dicks was 

presented for record. 

"It becomes my duty to resign as head of the 
department of Physical Education for women at the Massa- 
chusetts State College. 

"In March, 1917, I received a request from our 
college president, Dr. Butterfield, to 'consider the 
matter of giving gymnasium and similar work to the 
regular women students of the college. 1 It was wartime. 
Girls were coming to the Massachusetts Agricultural 
College to learn to fill the places of men who had been 
called to serve our country. 

"Since the request for my services was a 
definite way to be helpful, I gladly accepted the oppor- 
tunity, when college opened in September, to give- -as 
we all did then. That year the Trustees snowed their 
appreciation of my ten months' service by granting me two 
hundred dollars. From then until now, a period of 
twenty years, my privilege to be personally helpful to 
our girls ana boys has been made possible by increasing 
responses of appreciation from you. 

"My reward for my work is the result I have 
obtained through the education and development of my 
girls according to the ultimate aim of physical educa- 
tion; they know how to live a rich, abundant life, to 
meet their problems ana to render service to others. 

"My jj>leasure from this work has been the many 
friendships that have grown out of my association with 
the girls and boys. I leave them regretfully. 

"I have enjoyed seeing my work evolve into a 
practical and well established plan which was my objective 

"In concluding my services at Massachusetts 
State College I wish to express my appreciation for the 
cooperation I have had from you, Dr. Baker, and the 
Board of Trustees. 

"Although my duties may continue until 
September 1st, may I terminate my association with the 
college June 30th. 

"I have the honor to remain 

Very truly yours, 

/s/ Adeline E. dicks" 



Mrs. Hicks' 
Resignation 



830 



TRUSTEE 



Cooperative 

Research 

Project 



Budget 

Meeting 



THE MASSACHUSETTS AGRICULTURAL COLLEGE 

President Baker presented a proposal from 

Director Sievers for the establishment of a cooperative 

research project between the Experiment Station and the 

Vitex Laboratories, Inc. for the purpose of conducting 

certain investigations on foous containing vitamin D. 

Under the terms of the proposal, Vitex Laboratories Inc. 

would supply $400 for the establishment of a research 

fellowship at the College. The President explained that 

this was in accordance with similar cooperative projects 

which are now in force with the approval of the Trustees 

and he read the list of these projects. It was 

VOTED : To authorize the President to enter into 
an agreement with Vitex Laboratories Inc. 
for the College for the purpose set 
forth by Director Sievers in his recommenda- 
tion. 

Attention was called to the need for making 

preliminary arrangements for the annual budget meeting 

of the ^oard in September and upon the recommendation of 

the President, it was 

VOTED: To authorize the Secretary to issue call 
for a special meeting of the Board of 
Trustees to be held in Boston on 
September 29 for the purpose of con- 
sidering the annual budget of the College, 
personnel matters and such other items 
of current business as the President may 
wish to present — this meeting to be 
preceded by such committee meetings on 
September 28 as may appear advisable. 

President Baker reported that Commissioner 
Dean of the State Department of Conservation had per- 
mitted the College to use the facilities of former CCC 
Camp at Goshen for certain 4-H Camps and such other 



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TRUSTEE 



THE MASSACHUSETTS AGRICULTURAL COLLEGE 

activities of the College as might use these facilities 

to advantage. It was 

VOTED : To authorize the Secretary to express 

to the Commissioner of Conservation the 
appreciation of the Board of Trustees 
for his generosity in making available 
to the College tnese excellent camp 
facilities. 



83/ 



line teen thirty-eight will be the seventy-fifth 

year of the founding of the College ana it was suggested 

by the President that appropriate recognition be given to 

this anniversary. He spoke of a number of suggestions 

which have already been presented for fitting activities 

during the year. The suggestion appeared to meet with 

the approval of the Trustees, and, it was 

VOTED : To authorize the President to expend such 
funds as may be necessary from the current 
maintenance funds of the College in an 
amount not exceeding $500 for the purpose 
of providing suitable celebration for the 
seventy-fifth anniversary of tne College. 

As an illustration of tne cooperative rela- 
tionship existing -between this College and Amherst 
College, the President spoke of their kindness in loaning 
blankets and certain equipment for our use during the 
Commencement period and their request for the use of 
Thatcher Dormitory during the following week of their 
Commencement. Such relationships were approved by the 
Board and, it was 

VOTED: To authorize the President to notify the 
authorities of Amherst College that the 
Trustees take pleasure in making available 
to them for use during their Commencement 
the accommodations in Thatcher Hall which 
they have requested. 



Conservation 
Camp 



Seventy-fifth 
Anniversary 



Amherst Collegi 
use of 
Dormitory 



8se 



TRUSTEE 



Hotel Course 
authorized 



THE MASSACHUSETTS AGRICULTURAL COLLEGE 

The matter of the proposed course in the 
Stockbridge School for Hotel and Restaurant Operatives 
was again brought to the attention of the Trustees in 
the form of a second and special report by the Faculty 
Committee. The objectives of this proposed course as 
set forth in the report appeared to meet with the 
approval of the Trustees and the only- question involved 
appeared to be that of the title of the course, it 
was suggested by Trustees Griggs and Chandler that some 
such name as Foods and Food Preparation or Food 
Technology Designed for Hotel and Restaurant Operatives 
might well be substituted for the name as proposed. 
With this in view, it was 



VOTED: 



To authorize the President to proceed 
with the establishment of the course 
as proposed with the understanding 
that no additional personnel will be 
required during the first year and 
that increase in maintenance costs 
will not exceed 



Question was raised as to the advisability of 
including a non-agricultural course in the Stockbridge 
School of Agriculture and it seemed to be the general 
opinion of tne Trustees that this proposed course might 
v/ell be considered an agricultural course in the broad 
interpretation of the scope of Agriculture. It was 
suggested by Trustee Monahan that a course in Public 
Speaking be included in the curriculum of the new 
course. 

Trustee Griggs called the attention of the 
Board to the Association of Governing Boards of State 



r 



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• 



TRUSTEE 



% 



* 



THE MASSACHUSETTS AGRICULTURAL COLLEGE 

Universities and Allied Institutions and of its con- 
sideration of plans for its annual fall meeting. The 
officers are considering the possibility of holding 
this meeting in the East and possibly in Massachusetts 
and upon the recommendation of Mr. Griggs, it was 

VOTED : That this Board extend to the Association 
of Governing Boards of State Universities 
and Allied Institutions a cordial invita- 
tion to hold its 1957 conference in 
Amherst or at some other convenient 
place in Massachusetts. 

Also, it was 

VOTED : That President BaKer on behalf of the 
Board notify Secretary Springer of the 
association regarding the above invi- 
tation and pledge to him hearty' coopera- 
tion in making the conference an out- 
standing success. 

The meeting adjourned at 12:30 P.M. 
v-/ Y<2*K Cia*uJ d /tfLnrrTtUlsl^ V ice-PrfisidPnt. 

VTZ^S^etary 





835 



Meeting of 
Governing 
Boards Ass'n 



834 



TRUSTEE 



Call 



THE MASSACHUSETTS AGRICULTURAL COLLEGE 



MINUTES OF SPECIAL MEETING OF BOaHD OF TRUSTEES 

September 29, 1957, 10:00 A.M., Hotel Bellevue, Boston. 

Chairman, Vice President Bo?;ditch 

PRESENT: Trustees Bowditch, Dewey, Griggs, 

Whitmore, Monahan, Buttrick, Frost, 
Cassidy, Mrs. McNamara, President 
Baker, also Treasurer Kermey, 
Secretary Hawley, Mr. Pray 

Following is the call for the meeting. 

September 14, 1937 

Board of Trustees 
Massachusetts State College 

In accordance with the action of the Board of 
Trustees at its Semi-annual meeting on June 14, 1927, a 
special meeting of the Board is hereby called to convene 
at the Hotel Bellevue in Boston at 10:00 A.M. Wednesday, 
September 29, 1937. The purpose of this meeting will be 
to consider and take action concerning the annual budget 
of the College, personnel matters and such other items 
of current business as the President may wish to present. 

Yours respectfully, 

/s/ Robert D. Hawley 
Secretary 

Secretary Hawley read the minutes of Committee 

meetings held since the last meeting of the Full Board in 

June 1937. It was 

VOTED : To waive the reading of the minutes 
of the preceding meeting. 

It was 

VOTED: To ratify the minutes of the June meet- 
ing of the Board of Trustees. 

It was 

VOTED : To waive the reading of the investment 
list. 

It was 






* 



TRUSTEE 



f 



» 



THE MASSACHUSETTS AGRICULTURAL COLLEGE 

VOTED : To ratify the minutes of Committee meet- 
ings since June. These were Buildings 
and Grounds — August 20, 1937, Finance — 
July SO, 1937 and "Executive — August 11, 
1937, 

Mr. Pray read the recommendations of the Finance 
Committee which were explained by President Baker, In 
response to a question by Trustee Griggs, the President 
explained that the decrease in the budget for coal costs 
was due to the exceptionally light winter and the fact 
that the coal year does not correspond with the College 
fiscal year. Trustee Buttrick expressed the opinion 
that the presentation of Maintenance items as specials 
might conceivably better insure their chances of success 
when the budget is considered by State officials. Trustee 
Whitmore agreed. 

Trustee Griggs questioned the order of special 
items for presentation asking whether or not they might 
be better presented in order of need. Following a dis- 
cussion of changes in recommendation made by the Finance 



Committee, it was 



VOTED ; That the budget 
tenance as pres 
SI, 181, 248 from 
$297,589 from F 
including the e 
positions as li 
recommended by 



for Institutional Main- 
ented amounting to 

State Funds and 
ederal Funds be adopted 
stabl'ishment of new 
sted and other changes 
the Finance Committee. 



In accordance with action of the Trustee Com- 
mittee on Finance, the President presented to the Board a 
proposed budget for special appropriation composed of 
twenty-two items totaling $621,100. 



835 



Budget 



836 



TRUSTEE 



THE MASSACHUSETTS AGRICULTURAL COLLEGE 

Trustee Dewey suggested that askings for a new 
building might well be separated from the other requests 
and Trustee Euttrick suggested further breakdown of the 
special budget. 

Following a discussion of the requests for 
|S0, 000 for rebuilding the young stock barn recently des- 
troyed by fire, President Baker said he would not include 
this asking, if authorized, until it has been determined 
whether or not the Governor can finance reconstruction 
through emergency funds. The list of items in the special 
budget as approved by the Finance Committee follows: 



Project 

New Buildings 



1. Women's Building. 

2. Physics and Classroom Building 

3. Central Garage and Service Building 

4. Greenhouse and Headhouse 

5. Incinerator and Building 

6. Barn for Herd Sires 
Land P urchase 

7. Avery Tract 

8. Powers Property 

Repairs and Improvements to Plant 

9. Painting Buildings 

10. New Electric Wiring at Goessmann, Stock- 

bridge, Clark and Paige Laboratories 

11. Replace Ammonia Compressor at Dining 

Hall and Install New Set of Refrigera- 
tor Boxes 

12. Improvements at Draper Rail 

13. Rebuild Laboratory Tables in Physiologi- 

cal Laboratory at Marshall Hall 

14. Repairing and Repainting French Hall 

Greenhouses 

15. Completion of W.P.A. projects for Women 1 ! 

Athletic Field and Tennis Courts 

16. Insice Water Cooling and Recirculating 

Tower for Refrigerating Machines at 
Flint Laboratory, Dining Hall, Pomo- 
logy Cold Storage, Farm Dairy and 
Horticultural Manufactures 



Amount 

$250,000 

200,000 

35,000 

20,000 

4,000 

3,000 

5,000 
3,000 

6,000 

11,000 

6,500 
6,000 

3,000 

3,000 
4,000 





2,600 




% 



TRUSTEE 



k ' 



I 



THE MASSACHUSETTS AGRICULTURAL COLLEGE 



Project 
Improvement of Services 

17. Field and Laboratory Work, Shade Tree 
Diseases 
Research Service to Poultry Industry 
in the Field of Vitamin Values in 
Feedstuffs 
Research Service in Turf Improvement 
Special Funds 

20. Productive Enterprise Fund 

21. Aid to Students 

Total 

It was 



18. 



19. 



Amount 



$5,000 



5,000 
7,500 

4,000 

7,500 

25591,100 



VOTED: To adopt the budget for special appropria- 
tions as listed above. 

Following discussion, it was 

VOTED : That the Board of Trustees request the 

Governor T s special action in making funds 
available to rebuild the young stock barn 
burned on September 25. 

It was 

VOTED : That the President and Treasurer be 

authorized to spend up to $1,200 for re- 
pair of the barn if rebuilding through 
use of emergency funds is not possible. 

President Baker introduced the subject of pro- 
posed legislation qoverning the use of trust funds and 
administration by the Trustees of revolving funds such 
as the Dining Hall, Bookstore, etc. Trustee Griggs 
suggested that the President should call upon the ser- 
vice of the local representative in drawing a bill to 
clarify Section 7 of Chapter 75 of the General Laws. 

It was 

VOTED: To authorize the holding of a conference 
if and when such conference is called be- 
tween representatives of the United States 
Department of Agriculture, State Commission 
on Administration and Finance and the College 
for discussion of continuing use of Federal 
Funds. 



837 



Young Stock 

Barn 



Trust Fund 
Legislation 



Federal Fund 
Control 



836 



TRUSTEE 



Association of 
Governing 

Boards 



THE MASSACHUSETTS AGRICULTURAL COLLEGE 

It was 

VOTED : To authorize the Treasurer to make pur- 
chases as authorized by the Finance 
Committee* 

President Baker announced the meeting of the 

Governing Boards of State Colleges and Universities and 

Allied Institutions at the College on October 15, 14 and 

15, and it was 

VOTED : To authorize Trustee Griggs to represent 
the Board of Trustees at this meeting. 

The meeting adjourned at 12 noon, 

UjP y 'cknr* ruCL ■! Vice-President 

Acting Secretary 




> 



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# 



* 







• 



Appendix A 



• 



* 



Statement read by Harry D. Br own, President, 
Associate Alumni before Trustee Committee on 
Faculty and Program of Study, December 14, 1957 



This is a brief account of the discussion by the Directors 
of the Associate Alumni of the question of the award of the A.B. de- 
gree by Massachusetts State College, and of the action which the 
Directors have taken. 

On March 2, 1955, in response to a roll call, the Directors 
voted, unanimously, that it be the sentiment of the Board that the 
College grant the A.B. degree and that it be recommended to President 
Baker that the College grant this degree. A record of this vote was 
transmitted to President Baker, and, on June 28, 1955, a reply from 
Mr. Hawley indicated that the recommendation had been presented by the 
President to the Board of Trustees, which Board stated that the time 
was not propitious for the granting of the degree. 

The Directors first took up the discussion of the award of 
the A.B. degree in response to the requests of Alumni. It was the 
feeling of the Directors that numerous Alumni, especially younger 
Alumni, who wished to teach English or languages or who wished to do 
graduate work in those subjects, were hampered in securing employment 
or in securing admission to graduate scnools because of the fact that 
they presented as one qualification a B.S. instead of an A.B. degree. 
The Directors also felt, and strongly, that the award of the B.S. de- 
gree to many graduates of the College - who as undergraduates had 
taken a minimum of courses in science - was an inaccurate and obvious 
case of mislabeling. Throughout their discussion of the degree at this 
and later meetings it developed that the courses now offered by the 
College were those which logically lead to the granting of the degree 
at other colleges and that, whether or not there was a demand for the 
degree on the part of our students, it seemed that it would be logical 
for the College to award the degree. However, there was and is a de- 
mand. Further, a faculty committee which at President Baker *s request 
investigated the curriculum made its report and recommended that the 
A.B. degree be granted. 

Members of the official student committee on the A.B. degree 
twice met with the Directors, on November 2, 1955 and on March 8, 1956, 
to present the student point of view. These students pointed out that 
90$ of the undergraduate body had voted in favor of the award of the 
degree. 

The student committee also reported on March 8, 1956 that, 
in reply to questions asked of the administrators at Connecticut State 
College where the A.B. degree has been recently instituted, it was 
brought out that the A.B. seems to attract a better-prepared class of 
students; that no new courses had been added to the curriculum there; 
and that no administrative changes, of moment, have been necessary. 



/ 






Jp 



* 



^ 



Appendix A -2- 



The Directors of the Associate Alumni, deeply concerned with 
the fact that enrollment of men students at the College showed an in- 
crease in the class of 1941 of only 33 over the number which enrolled 
in the class of 1919 (an average increase of only 1.5 boys per year), 
felt that the award of the A.B. might help to increase the enrollment 
of men students at the College, 

It is the feeling of the Directors that it definitely seems 
to be for the best interests of the College that the A.B. degree be 
granted; and that if the A.B. degree is to be granted by any state 
college in Massachusetts that it should be awarded by Massachusetts 
State College. They feel too, that it would be increasingly difficult 
for us to compete for students with other state or low-tuition colleges 
in this State granting such a degree if we did not. 

The Directors are further impressed by the explanation by 
Senator Morrill of the intended scope and function of the land grant 
colleges, which statement appears on page 3 in Volume II of the Survey 
of Land Grant Colleges and Universities, published in 1930 by the 
United States Department of the Interior. 

The statement: "The design was to open the door to a 
liberal education for this large class (industrial class) at a cheaper 
cost from being close at hand and to tempt them by offering not only 
sound literary instruction, but something more applicable to the pro- 
ductive employments of life. It would be a mistake to suppose it was 
intended that every student should become either a farmer or a 
mechanic, when the design comprehended not only instruction for those 
who hold the plow or follow a trade, but such instruction as any person 
might need - with all the world before them where to choose - and 
without the exclusion of those who might prefer to adhere to the classics . y 

On October 30, 1937 the Directors of the Associate Alumni 
again voted in regard to the A.B, degree. wliereas their first vote 
recommended the granting of the degree and made no mention of time, on 
October 30 they voted to go on record as being unanimously in favor of 
the immediate granting of the A.B. degree by Massachusetts State College. 



Questions and Answers Following the Presentation 
of the Report of the Alumni Committee 

President Baker: I have two comments on Mr. Brown 1 s statement. The 

study of the curriculum referred to was made by two 
committees set up in 1934, one from the faculty and 
one from the student body. The Trustees have 
copies of these two reports. While both of these 
reports contain reference to the A.B. degree, there 
was no thought in my mind at the time that this was 
an investigation of facts which might fortify either 
for or against the granting of the degree. The 
study was a study of the cirriculum for the purpose 
of showing how it might be improved, etc. 



m 



» 



* 



1 



• 



Appendix A 



Trustee Griggs; 



Mr, Brown: 



* 



Trustee Griggs 



Mr, Brown: 
Mr. Phelan: 



Mr. Brown: 
Mr. Phelan: 
Mr. Brown: 
Mr. Phelan: 



* 



Mr. Brown: 



-3- 



As far as the students petition for the degree 
is concerned j signed by a very large number of 
students, I do not interpret the number of stu- 
dents signing the petition as extremely significant 
since it is easy to get signatures to any petition* 
However, as a demonstration, it indicates an active 
attitude of the majority of students. 

How much real study, Mr. Brown, has the Alumni 
Association made into this subject? You appreciate 
the fact that the students have made a survey and 
the faculty have made a survey and taken certain 
action. And you said that the younger Alumni 
particularly have been active in campaigning for 
this degree. Have you made announcement previous 
to meetings of the Board of Directors inviting those 
interested to appear either for or against the idea 
before the Board? 

In our call to meetings of the Alumni Directors we 
have indicated subjects which were to be discussed. 
As far as possible before meetings, the directors 
have talked over the various matters to be discussed 
with other Humni. There was no definite attempt to 
bring persons to testify either for or against this 
matter. One of the directors who holds advanced de- 
grees from other institutions is very outspoken re- 
garding the granting of the A.B. degree here. He 
thinks it should be done. A younger member of the 
Board of Directors said it would have helped him and 
others if he had the A.B. degree in the teaching end 
of his work. He said he had to compete with people 
of other institutions and that the lack of an A.B. 
degree has hampered him in getting a job. 

Do you mean in the teaching field? Does it apply 
in other fields? 

Teaching field. 

If the A.B. degree should be granted here, what are 
the arguments for it? 

This is the State College of Massachusetts. 

But there are other state colleges of learning. 

Do these others grant degrees? 

They grant the B.S. in Education. And would there be 
any outstanding achievement in the field of education 
that should make it necessary to grant the A.B. degree 
at this institution? 

We have here all the facilities of the various branches 
of education. It seems to me that this would be the 
place for the degree. 



* 






# 



* 



* 



Appendix A 
Mr. Phelan: 



Mr. Brora: 



Mr. Phelan: 



Mr. Brown: 
Mr. Phelan; 



Mr. Brown: 
Mr. phelan: 

Mr. Brown: 

Mr. Phelan: 
Mr. Brown: 
President Baker: 



Trustee Chandler: 



Mr. Brown: 



-4- 



Do you know of our teachers colleges. They give 
the degree of B.S. in Education. Some have granted 
Master's degrees in Education. You also mentioned 
the fact that a member of the Alumni felt that the 
A.B. should be granted but the B.S. degree was no 
barrier to his securing advanced degrees, was it? 

He did not go into the teaching field, either from 
here or other institutions. He feels if he had, 
however, that an A.B. degree would have helped in 
his work in other institutions. I can't tell you 
just what other degrees he has. 

What about the B.S. being a barrier as far as enter- 
ing the teaching profession? The B.S. is broader than 
the B.S. in Education granted at the teachers colleges. 

Are graduates of these colleges able to compete with 
persons holding the A.B. degree. 

They were able to get positions in competition with 
those who have the A.B. and in competition with some 
who have the Master's degree. 

Didn't it hold them up? 

Their teaching position and their advancement will be 
in keeping with their professional improvement. 

Do they have ability to get such positions with the 
B.S. degree as with the A.B. degree? 

Yes. 

I did not think so. 

As a matter of information, may I state that a recent 
survey shows that there are more persons in the teach- 
ing field holding the B.S. than the A.B. degree in 
this country. 

You and members of the Alumni Association feel then 
that if this step should be taken and approved hy the 
Legislature we would expect two things to happen, 
either our science development which is excellent 
would fall off and the courses of the A.B. would in- 
crease resulting in quite a change here, or else the 
College would have to just about double its size to 
take care of those seeking the A.B. degree. 

I don't know. My viewpoint is that the act as 
originally planned for this institution covered all 
of the liberal arts and we haven't as much of that 

here as we should have to attract everybody who might 
want to come here. 



i 






Appendix A 



-5- 



Trustee Chandler: There again we are entirely dependent on the tax- 
payers. How far do they wish us to go? 

.Mr. Brown: That would be very definitely told to us by what 

the Legislature will give us in appropriations. 

Trustee Chandler: We do not have to have legislative approval for the 

granting of this degree, do we? 



President Baker: 



Trustee Dewey: 
Trustee Griggs: 



Mr. Brown: 
Trustee Chandler: 

Dean Machmer: 
Mr. Phelan: 

Mr. Brown: 
Mr. Phelan: 
Mr. Brown: 



No. Authority set forth in the organic act which 
allows the Trustees to grant degrees is sufficient. 
There have been changes in the degrees granted in 
the past. 

Any other questions? 

I would like information regarding the experience 
at Connecticut State since the awarding of the A.B. 
Are they enrolling better students? Can you 
amplify? 

(Quoted a section of his paper concerning this matter.) 

How long has the A.B. degree been in effect at 
Connecticut State? 

About four years. 

Do you not think that entrance examinations here are 
extremely comprehensive covering all subject matter 
fields? 

I do not know whether Connecticut has such a large 
number of applicants as we have. 

Perhaps the selective process would take the form of 
being more rigid in marking. 

Possibly Connecticut State does not have the demands 
we have here. 



Trustee Chandler: Do the Alumni realize the position that the Trustees 

and the College authorities are in at the present 
time? We have already limited the enrollment, not by 
law, but because of lack of facilities, etc. Now if 
we should take in more students who might be 
attracted by the A.B., wouldnH that mean we would 
have fewer students who are preparing along scientific 
lines for which this College has a very enviable 
reputation? I should think if it might increase our 
enrollment, it would mean that we would have a smaller 
number of candidates for the B.S. degree. Do you 
think the Alumni would view that with approval? Have 
you means by which you can secure funds to increase 
the enrollment? 



* 



Appendix A 



•6- 



^ 



Mr. Brown: 
Trustee Dewey: 



Mr. Brown: 



Trustee Dewey: 



Mr. Brown: 
Trustee Dewey: 



Mr. Brown: 



Trustee Dewey: 



Mrs. McNamara; 



President Baker: 



* 



Trustee Monahan: 

Mr. Brown: 

Trustee Dewey: 
Mr. Brown: 
Trustee Dewey: 



Our funds have to come from the Legislature. 

We are simply an agent for the expenditure of the 
funds after appropriation. 

Wouldn't you raise the standard of type of student 
coming here for both scientific and other work? 

We probably would get some good students, though we 
do now. 

I agree. 

Do we want to improve our student body at the expense 
of students in scientific fields? At the present 
time other colleges are introducing more and more 
science because of the demand of the world at the 
present time for this type of education. 

Again, I refer to the statement of Senator Morrill — 
make as broad an institution as possible. 

That's fine, but the Legislature does not read that 
act. 

Dr. Dewey, I was wondering if perhaps some of the 
young men and women who might want the A.B. degree 
have gone into other of the New England States — 
say the University of New Hampshire? 

Yes, a very considerable number of Massachusetts boys 
and girls are going to the University of Maine, 
University of Vermont, and University of New Hampshire. 
Some data on numbers going out of the State to these 
colleges has been selected from catalogues of these 
institutions. We have not broken these figures down, 
however, as to the work taken at these out-of-state 
colleges. We do know that some Massachusetts students 
go to other land grant colleges for engineering work 
for instance. 

Mr. Brown, did any members of the Alumni Association 
raise serious objection to the granting of the A.B. 
degree? 

No serious objections were raised at meetings of the 
Directors* 

How many members are there on the Board of Directors? 

16 

How many of them are pursuing agriculture or are they 
engaged in other professions? 



i 



i 



t 



• 



Appendix A 



-7- 



Mr. Brown: I should say about a quarter are engaged in farming 
Trustee Malcolm: Do you note any differences in their attitude? 

No. 



Mr. Brown: 
Trustee Griggs: 



Mr. Dor an: 



Trustee Griggs: 



• 



Mr. Brown: 



Trustee Griggs: 



When we changed the name of Massachusetts Agricultural 
College to Massachusetts State College, it was with 
the idea that we would let the people know that this 
wasn't strictly a "dirt farmers" college. We thought 
it would attract students who otherwise stayed away. 
Since the change of name, has there been a change in 
the type of the student body? Has there been an im- 
provement over what we had when the name was 
"agricultural"? 

I think students seeking agriculture, who formerly 
would have been in the four year course are now 
largely in the two year course of the Stockbridge 
School. 

We all know that Mr. Brown was a member of the 
Legislature until recently and we know that there 
was some discussion at the time of the change of 
name as to whether or not the change was a step 
toward forming a university. The proposed A.B. de- 
gree might suggest such an interpretation, ^ould 



you express, in your opinion, 



Mr. 



Br own „ what 



attitude the Legislature might take? 



I wouldn t know, 
years. * 



I have been away for three or four 



Do you recall that at the time the bill for the 
change of name was debated, George Anderson of Boston 
felt it would mean a step toward a state university? 
A member of the Alumni, also a member of the House, 
said it would not be a step in that direction and 
Mr. Anderson accepted the statement. 



* 



* 



r 



Appendix B 



Summary of Questions and Answers following the 
presentation of the Report of the Student 
Committee on the A.B. Degree at the Trustee 
Meeting of the Committee on Faculty and Program 
of Study, December 14, 1937 <, (On following pages 
are included other reports submitted by the stu~ 
dents at this time) 



Miss Bechers 



Trustee Deweys 



Miss Bechers 
Trustee Deweys 
Miss Bechers 



The Woman's Student Government Association Council, 
which represents the women students of the three 
upper classes, feels qualified to stand 100$ in favor 
of the adoption of the A.B. degree. 

How about those in the Home Economics Division who 
would not be eligible for the A o B degree? Do they 
feel they are handicapped in any way because they 
can't get the A.B.? 

They do not feel that they are handicapped. 

Is the B„S. more valuable to them than the A.B.? 

Yes, 



Trustee Deweys 



Miss Strode s 



Miss Strode presented the cultural interests on the 
Massachusetts State College Campus „ 

Do you feel you are more likely to get jobs if you 
have the A„B. degree? 

£es, we are. 



Trustee Malcolm: 



Mr. Frenchs 



Trustee Malcolm; 



Mr. Frenchs 



Cyrus French '38 presented the attitude of the 
scientific students on Campus. 

Is there a program outlined for the scientific group 
comparable to that outlined by Miss Strode for the 
cultural interests? 

We have weekly meetings of scientifically minded people, 
The qbemistry Club has a program (which brings in out- 
standing speakers, and some times has a speaker from 
the staff.) 

If an outstanding program of distinguished scientists 
of national reputation was outlined would it be as 
enthusiastically attended by the student body as would 
one of the cultural programs? 

Probably not. Science students are also interested in 
culture, where art students are not so much interested 
in science, nor so well able to understand it. 



^ 



f 



1 



• 



Appendix B 
Trustee Griggs; 



Miss Strode s 

Trustee Griggss 
Miss Strode; 

Trustee Griggss 



"Mr. Hay Ions 



• 



Miss Strode: 



Miss Strode has stated she is eager to graduate with the 
A.B. degree. Why are you so eager, Miss Strode? I pre- 
sume you have a definite position in mind which you 
would like to secure where an A.B. degree would be much 
more helpful than the B.S.? 

Yes, I have a definite position in mind. The B.S. 
will throw me into more competition in seeking this 
position. 

Would this happen in any other field than Education? 

(Gave specific examples of difficulties arising from 
the broad field covered by the B.S. degree) 

I wonder if graduates of the College run into difficulty 
about degrees when seeking positions. Don ! t the 
employers rather &&}£, what courses have been taken, 
what the major subject was, etc. Does the degree mean 
a great deal? 

There is quite a bit of difference in going into 
Graduate School or going into law, I am very interested 
in \aw and a friend of my father's, a lawyer in Detroit, 
is taking an interest in my work* He said that an A.B » 
would be of much greater help to me in getting a better 
standing in the University of Detroit. 

You may not know that it is almost impossible for an 
English major to get a scholarship or a fellowship in 
other colleges because of our B.S. degree. 



Mrs. McNamaras 



Trustee Dewey: 



* 



Mr. Hoar: 



Following some discussion of the cost of a college 
education, the hearing proceeded. 

I feel we all have learned much about the College, I can 
appreciate how Miss Strode feels as I have been a teacher 
myself. 

Mr. Hoar, suppose an A.B. degree were given. Do you 
think it would influence students, as far as your 
knowledge of human nature is concerned, in the choice 
of their courses? In other words, when they come to 
make a choice as to their major — subject of interest — 
would they be influenced and perhaps select courses 
leading to the A.B. degree simply because it was an 
A.B. and not because it was their own interest? 

We haven't taken a consensus of opinion. I think myself 
that most of the students who elect to major in Social 
Sciences do so because they want that kind of training. 
I majored in English because I wanted a broader education 
than I could get in Science. 



* 



f 



^p Appendix B 
Mr. Haylon: 

Mr. French: 



Trustee Dewey: 
Mr. French; 

Trustee Dewey s 

Mr. Frenchs 
Miss Bechers 



• 



Trustee Griggs: 



Mr . Hoar : 



Trustee Dewey 



Miss Strode: 



* 



President Baker: 



- 3-- 

For myself, following courses leading to the Arts degree 
would contain th? courses which I need for Law School. 
The Arts degree Is accepted without question. 

The B.S, would, of course, mean more to me as I am in- 
terested in Chemistry and expect to go into that field 
of work. The B.S* is of a great deal of value — not 
as much value as the A.B. 

Would the Chemistry group be affected? 

Every one who came here with the idea in mind that 
he wanted to major in Chemistry would, of course, 
take the chemistry courses. 

This would not affect the judgment of the students — 
the A.B. degree, I mean? 

No, I think not. 

As I am a Home Economics major, the B.S. would be a 
better degree for me. However, I came here with the 
Yale School of Nursing as my goal and found from their 
catalogue that either degree is acceptable. 

I noticed that in the figures which Mr. Hoar gave us 
as to the Senior Class that 62 were in favor of the 
A.B. and 10 not in favor. Why did not the majority of 
students vote in this poll? Were there not around 200 
in the class? 

The questionnaire did not reach all the seniors, 
primarily because we do not have facilities to take 
care of the entire student body in the auditorium for 
Convocation. Consequently those seniors present were 
the only ones who participated in the questionnaire. 

I wish to thank you young people and want to assure you 
that we have open minds. You must realize that we are 
not altogether free agents. However, we do have the 
power to grant the degree , but there are other considera- 
tions to take into account, such as finances, adequate 
e quipmen t , e tc « 

We all realize the financial difficulties involved, but 
feel that we have gone into the matter deeply enough to 
prove to you that there will be no additional cost 
nor new courses needed with the granting of the A.B. 
degree. 

I feel it would be. very helpful if the data which you 
have could be put into shape. It would be helpful to 

the Commit tee « 



f 



* 



Appendix B -4- 



December 16, 1937 

Board of Trustees 
Massachusetts State College 
Amherst, Massachusetts 

Gentlemen: 

The student committee which represents 
the student body in their request for a Bachelor 
of Arts degree wish to thank the trustees for 
their kind consideration of our problem Vte 
would also like to offer our services, if there 
is any way in which we could help in the settling 
of this issue. 

Perhaps it is also pertinent that we 
should add at this time that our request for a 
Bachelor of Arts degree is made with no thought 
what soever of an university, but only from the 
present needs of our college. The question of a 
state university was raised by the college news- 
paper, but this was purely academic and represented 
no strong sentiment among the faculty or students. 

Respectfully yours, 

/s/ Barbara F, Strode 
/s/ John S. Hoar 
/s/ Cyrus £. French 
/s/ George J. Haylon 
/s/ Marion Becher 



r 



' 



~v 



• 



*> 



Appendix B -5- 

PETITION 

I. Whereas we, the duly constituted representatives of the under- 
graduate students of the Massachusetts State College are firmly 
convinced: 

(1) That college degrees should correspond to the courses 
pursued for such degrees; 

(2) That for certain of the courses of instruction, (namely 
some of those in the Division of Social Sciences) offered at 
the Massachusetts State College, the degree of Bachelor of Arts 
is the traditional and appropriate degree; 

(5) That similar courses of instruction pursued at other 
reputable colleges do lead to the Arts degree; 

(4) That approximately a third of the students at the 
Massachusetts State College are pursuing such courses; and that 
the number of these students is increasing; 

(5) That such students, erroneously awarded the degree of 
Bachelor of Science, find themselves inconvenienced and even 
handicapped by lacking the degree consistent with the studies 
that they have pursued, and the professional endeavors that they 
wish to follow; 

II o Whereas we note: 

(1) That the Massachusetts State College is at present en- 
gaged in modification and expansion of its curriculum; 

(2) That a careful survey of the present curriculum at the 
Massachusetts State College has shown that the introduction of 
the degree of Bachelor of Arts for properly qualified students 
would involve little or no immediate special costs, or administra- 
tive inconvenience; 

(3) That, far from working to the disadvantage of under- 
graduates not pursuing courses leading to the proposed degree, 
the adoption of the Degree of Bachelor of Arts would actually 
work for their benefit; 

(4) That the introduction of the degree of Bachelor of Arts 
would thus, without appreciable expense, cooperate with the 
efforts of the College to be of wider, more comprehensive, more 
representative service to the sons and daughters of the citizens 
of Massachusetts, and, hence, to the Commonwealth as a whole. 

III. And whereas we further note: 

(1) That the granting of the degree of Bachelor of Arts is in 
full harmony with the history and the tradition of the Land 
Grant institutions; 

(2) That the Charter of the Massachusetts State College permits 
the adoption of a degree such as that of Bachelor of Arts, by 
action of the Board of Trustees of the College, without special 
action by the Legislature of Massachusetts; 

(3) That the Administration of tfre College has already 
emphasized, in public, the soundness of the principle of the 
bachelor of Arts degree for the College; 

(4) That the Board of Directors of the Associate Alumni of 
the Massachusetts State College have expressed themselves in 
favor of the immediate adoption of the degree of Bachelor of 
Arts by this college; 



f 



f 



' 




-> 



appendix B -6- 

(5) That numerous Alumni, both as groups and as individuals, 
have expressed themselves as heartily in favor of the same pro- 
cedure; 

(6) That the undergraduates of the Massachusetts State 
College, irrespective of their own immediate lines of study, have 
more than once declared themselves to be in favor of the 
immediate adoption of the Bachelor of Arts for properly qualified 
students; 

(7) That the special Student Committee, appointed by the 
Administration to make a study of the undergraduate curriculum 
of the College, has recommended the adoption of the degree of 
Bachelor of Arts; 

(8) That the special Faculty Committee, appointed by the Ad- 
ministration to make a similar study, has recommended the 
adoption of the degree of Bachelor of Arts; 

IV. And furthermore, whereas we heartily endorse the sentiment of the 
Father of Land Grant Legislation, Senator Justin L. Morrill, who 
said: 

"The design was to open the door to a liberal education 
for this large class (industrial) at a cheaper cost from 
being close at hand and to tempt them by offering not only 
sound literary instruction , but something more applicable 
to the productive enjoyments of life. It would be a mistake 
to suppose it was intended that every student should become 
either a farmer or a mechanic, when the design comprehended 
not only instruction for those who hold the plow or follow 
a trade, but such instruction as any person might need^ — with 
all the world before them where to choose — and without the 
exclusion of tjjpje yho might prefer to adhere to the classics 
(now more generally known as the liberal arts) . 

V. We, therefore, do hereby seriously and respectfully petition the 
Board of Trustees of the Massachusetts State College to take such 
action as is necessary for the immediate institution of the de- 
gree of Bachelor of Arts, to be awarded to the undergraduates who 
are pursuing courses of study traditionally and appropriately 
associated with that degree. 



# 



* 



$ 



• 



Appendix B 



-7. 



Report to the Trustees of Student Opinion on 

the A.B. Degree 

by John S. Hoar, »38 



Having had no connection with this committee until last 
Wednesday, when I was asked to appear at this meeting, I come repre- 
senting, perhaps, the point of view of the students in general 
rather than that of the students who have led the movement for the 
A.B. degree. 

Sentiment on the part of the student body has favored an 
A.B. degree ever since I have been in college — since 1934. Without 
agitation by any particular group that sentiment gradually strengthened 
until, when the Collegian published an editorial on the subject on 
October 31, 1935. requesting consideration by the administration and 
expression of interest from the students, a rather strong demand for 
the degree set in, and cannot be said to have subsided since, ^ithin 
one week the student Senate had appointed a committee to investigate, 
and four communications from students had been printed in the 
Collegian. Another week, and there was a report of a conference with 
President Baker from the student committee. A poll of student opinion 
'had been taken, indicating that ninety-two per cent of the six hundred 
forty students reached were in favor of the immediate granting of the 
degree. 

By December 18 there had been a second conference with 
members of the Administration at which President Baker expressed much 
interest in the proposal, and there had been an entire convocation 
period devoted to a discussion of it by the President. For a number 
of weeks thereafter much discussion and editorial comment appeared in 
the Collegian , some of it, I regret to say, a little overheated; yet 
the student committee tried always to be fair, purposely refraining, 
for instance, from carrying the discussion off campus to the newspapers 
of the state, where it might have been misunderstood and used to un- 
dermine faith in the unity of the campus. 

Though discussion of the matter was soon dropped, as a re- 
sult of both the students and the administration having expressed 
themselves fully without being able to agree entirely, student in- 
terest by no means died. For one thing, many students felt that the 
administration, far from being definitely opposed to the degree, was 
rather sympathetic, and wanted to wait only until it could be sure 
that the degree would cause no serious antagonism from groups other 
than those on the campus. The student committee forged steadily ahead 
on its task of accumulating data to prove that the degree was 
necessary, was practicable, and would be warmly supported by the stu- 
dent body. 



* 



f 



I 




Ippendix B 



-8- 



• 



On November 19, 1936, the student committee reported on 
the changes which would have to be effected in the cirriculum in 
order to provide adequate training for the A.B. degree, and 
discussion of the matter continued to some extent throughout last 
winter, despite the fact that the administration offered little or 
no comment. On May 6 the senior class voted (though many were not 
reached) sixty- two to ten in favor of the A.B. degree. 

On May 13 it was reported that the petition of the student 
committee had been presented to the Trustees, On May 20, at the 
Trustee Convocation, Professor Rand addressed the student body on 
the liberal arts, and none of you who were present can doubt the 
genuine enthusiasm with which that speech was received. 

Since May 20 there has been only one editorial in the Col - 
legian, so far as I know, on the A.B, degree (Sept, 30), and no 
communications. This absence of agitation does not, of course, indi- 
cate lack of interest on the part of the student body; rather it was 
felt that the matter was in the hands of the Trustees, and that 
further immediate agitation was unnecessary and might be misunderstood. 

Realizing, however, that you woula be interested in knowing 
'the exact student opinion at present, especially as no general poll 
had been taken since the fall of 1935, we have, within the last few 
days, conducted a census of opinion in the three dormitories and in 
all the sororities and fraternities except Phi Sigma Kappa, which 
failed to bring the matter up in meeting. The total results are: 



Students 


reached 


597 




Students 


indifferent 


21- 


-3.3$ 


Students 


opposed 


30- 


— D « O/o 


Students 


in favor 


546- 


-91.4$ 



I have not mentioned one poll, taken last spring by Mr. 
French, '38, a ma^or in science and the president of the Chemistry 
Club. He will report a poll of the student science clubs. 



*) 



* 



f 



f 



Appendix B -9«- 



# 



^ 



The A.B. Degree Question 
A Poll of the M.S.C. Scientific Clubs 
(Taken during April & May 1937) 
Reported by Cyrus French ! 38 



Chemistry Club 


4/27/37 


48 


Fernald Entomology 
Club 


4/28/37 


12 


Dairy Club 


4/27/37 


4 


Mathematics Club 


4/21/37 


14 


Pre Medical Club 


5/13/37 


20 



Favor adoption Do not favor In- 
of A.B. degree A.B. degree different 



3 



2 8 
5 
2 



Bacteriology Club (not cont acted) 



Total 98 12 8 



II. Four types of opinion were manifested at the discussions before 

each vote was taken: 

1« A few were indiferent as to the entire A.B. 
degree question. 

2o Several objected on the grounds that College 
funds woulu. be diverted from the Sciences to 
the Arts. 

3. Many believed that it was entirely just for 
the Language & Literature majors to ask for 
the A.B. degree and were very sympathetic. 

4. Another large group believed that the granting 
of a B.S. degree in the Arts detracted from 
the value of their degree. 







< 



* 



1 



Appendix B -10- 



# 



Statement by Miss M. Becher '38 
Speaking for Home Economics majors & V/.S.G.A. 



t) 



As a major in Home Economics, the realization of the 
A.B. degree here .makes little practical difference to me. How- 
ever , in the interests of the other students to whom this de- 
gree would bring greater advantages , we are all hoping for the 
approval of the measure. 

Speaking also as President of the v r oman ! s Student 
Government Association, the Council of which represents the women 
students of the three upper classes, I feel qualified to state 
that we are one hundred per cent in favor of the A.B. degree. 



* 



♦ 



f 



1 



Appendix B 



-11- 



Report on the Cultural Development of Massachusetts State College 

by Barbara Strode ? 38 



Before considering the cultural developments of this campus, 
I would like to make clear to the trustees that the students request 
for an A,B. degree is by no means merely a passing desire, nor is li- 
the sentiment of only a few. We, the senior class want a Bachelor of 
Arts degree now — we want to graduate with a Bachelor of Arts degree. 
But the undergraduates are &9 eager for the degree as we are. The 



answer which greeted me in taking 
course we support the request for 
to know is why can't we have it?" 
vitally on this issue. 



the census of the Abbey wax, w 0f 
the degree, but the tiling we want 
Indeed, the student body does feel 



show his 



(Readinj 
support., 



of a paragraph from Senator Morrill's writings to 



List of statistics to show the cultural interests on the 
campus. Number of students enrolled in the arts courses as their 
major field: . 



English 
French 
German 
History 



46 

5 

2 

22 

75 



(and this includes only the 
junior and senior classes,) 



Number of students enrolled in special arts classes: 

Art Appreciation 65 
Music Appreciation 22 
Religion 43 

There are .a great many other examples of the culturally- 
mindedness of our campus. Mr, Erick Clarke of the Carnegie Founda- 
tion considers our campus as a pioneer in the presentation of the 
Sprang Chamber Music, Harold Bauer gave his first collegiate per- 
formance on our campus. And the Amherst College lectures are notable 
for their attendance by our students. 

In the Academic Activities, which are all cultural in their 
scope over three hundred students received credit last year. These 
include Index Board, Glee Clubs, Dramatics, Collegian and Debating. 

Out of 879 Community Concerts sold in this district which 
includes all of Amherst, Northampton and the surrounding towns, 330 
were sold to our students. This is over a third, and for the last 
five years, which is as long as they have been selling these tickets, 
the State College has always sold more than three times as many 
tickets as Amherst College, 



* 



* 



m 



Appendix B 



-12- 



Let me survey the events that have taken place on this 
campus during the last two weeks as being typical of the cultural 
programs that are always available here and that are eagerly 
supported by the students: 81 students tried out for the winter 
play two weeks ago Thursday; over 50 students have tried out for 
parts in the Gilbert and Sullivan operetta this week; Richard 
Lorleberg and his sister Grete Von Bayer are at present on the 
campus having given five concerts in two days — the last one 
being tonight; Helen Jepson was here last week on Wednesday and 
two weeks ago Friday, Blanche Yurka. Then there are the Sunday 
vesper services and the Tuesday afternoon Fine Arts Programs to 
be considered. 

We certainly are a culturally-minded institution. 



* 



i 



■ - 



#• 



w 



* 



& Appendix B -13- 



Report to the Trustees of the Student Committee on 

the A.B. Degree 








CONNECTICUT STATE COLLEGE 
Storrs, Connecticut 

March 3, 1936 

* 

Mr, Carl P. Swanson 
Secretary, Student Committee 
Massachusetts State College 
Amherst, Mass, 

Dear Mr, Swanson: 

I have received your letter of February 24th in which you 
ask specifically about some phases of our experience with the A,B, 
Curriculum, I am pleased to answer these questions and would have 
done so sooner except for a delay in obtaining needed data from a 
survey which is just now completed. 

This survey made of our Junior class in the division of 
Arts and Sciences shows conslusively that the students working for 
the A.B. degree are scholastically quite superior to the students 
working for the B.S. degree. In this way the composition of our 
student body is somewhat changed, internally at least, and it may 
also be changed from year to year by the fact that this new curriculum 
seems to be attracting the attention of the better prepared high 
school students who would not otherwise come to Connecticut State 
College, It is, however, too early for us to draw definite conclu- 
sions as to this last statement. 

Another interpretation of your first question woulu be 
answered by stating that we conferred the A.B. degree on fourteen 
students in 1933, on twenty-three students in 1934, and on twenty- 
one students in 1935, and by adding that our present student body in 
the division of Arts and Sciences is composed of approximately forty 
percent Arts students, I look for a further increase to about fifty 
percent, after which there will probahly be little change for some 
time to come. 

There was no cost connected with the installation of the 

new curriculum. The teaching staff and administration staff were 
quite adequate to carry the slightly augmented load. 



m 



m 






N^ Appendix B -14- 



m 



Answering your third question I may say that although we 
have added new courses from tim$ to time none have been added 
especially for use in the A.B. curriculum alone. 

Since the set-up of the A.B, curriculum only necessitated 
a few changes in the entrance requirements and the assignment of re- 
quired courses already in our program, and as the Division of Science 
was expanded by decree to include work in the Arts under the title of 
Division of Arts and Sciences, no new administrative or departmental 
set-up was necessary. 

Under separate cover I am sending you a copy of our present 
catalogue with the thought in mind that perhaps you would like to 
study in detail the set-up for the two degrees at Connecticut State 
College. This can be easily done by turning directly to pages 28 to 
31. I am also sending you data concerning courses required for de- 
grees in about 100 American colleges. Although collected in 1933-34 
it still has considerable value. If I can be of any further help to 
you, kindly let me know. 

Fith my best wishes for your success, I am 

Sincerely yours, 

/s/ II • D. Newton, Dean 

Division of Arts and Sciences 



' 



* 



^ 




m 



Appendix B 



-15- 



Report to the Trustees of the Student Committee on 

the A.B. Degree 



This summary of a study made of the curricula of one 
hundred colleges and universities many of v:hich grant A.B. degrees 
indicates that our curriculum is sufficiently broad to make possible 
our granting an A.B. degree without additional courses. The names 
of the colleges and universities involved follow: 



Amherst College 
Bates College 
Bowdoin College 
Clemson Agricultural College 
Colgate University 
Colorado Agricultural College 
Cornell University 
Duke University 
Harvard University 
Johns Hopkins University 
Lafayette College 
Louisiana State University 
Mass. State College 
I* 'Mississippi A. and M. College 
Mount. Holyoke College 
North Carolina State College 
Ohio State University 
Oregon State $.gri. College 
Purdue University 
Rutgers University 
South Dakota State College 
State College of Washington 
University of Alabama 
University of Arkansas 
University of Colorado 
University of Georgia 
University of Illinois 
University of Kansas 
University of Maine 
University of Minnesota 
University of Mississippi 
University of Montana 
University of Nevada 
University of New Mexico 
University of North Dakota 
University of Oregon 
University of Bittsburgh 
University of South Carolina 
University of Tennessee 



Alfred University 

Boston University 

Brown University 

Colby College 

College of City of New York 

Columbia University 

Dartmouth College 

Fordham University 

Iowa State College of Agriculture 

Kansas State College of Agriculture 

Lehigh University 

Mass. Institute of Technology 

Michigan State College 

Montana State College 

New York University 

North Dakota Agricultural College 

Oklahoma A. and M. College 

Princeton University 

Rhode Island State College 

Smith College 

Stanford University 

Temple University 

University of Arkansas 

University of California 

University of Florida 

University of Idaho 

University of Iowa 

University of Kentucky 

University of Maryland 

University of Michigan 

University of Missouri 

University of Nebraska 

University of New Hampshire 

University of North Carolina 

University of Oklahoma 

University of Pennsylvania 

University of Rochester 

University of South Dakota 

University of Texas 





* 



§1 



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Appendix B 



-16- 



University of Utah 
University of Virginia 
University of Wisconsin 
Vassar College 
Western State College of 
West Virginia University 
w esleyan University 



Col 



University of Vermont 
University of Washington 
University of Wyoming 
Western Reserve University 
West Virginia State College 
Williams College 




P 



^ 



i 



Appendix B 



17- 



ANALYSIS OF THE COURSES OF STUDY IN COLLEGES GETTING THE A.B. DEGREE 

EVERY College that grants the A.B. degree requires credits in the 
following subjects: 

1. English 

2. History 

5. Foreign Languages (either French or German) 

4. Science — credits to be elected from the following: 

a. Astronomy 

b. Biology 

c. Botany 

d. Chemistry 

e. Geology 

f. Physics 

Most of the Colleges that grant the A.B. degree have in their curricula 
the following courses from which elective credits may be chosen: 

1, Mathematics 

2. Music 

5. Psychology 

4. Philosophy 

5. Public Speaking 

6* Physical Education 

7. Economics 

8. Government 

Following is a list of EVERY subject that is listed among the curricula 
of the Colleges that grant the A.B. degree. This list is divided into 
two parts. 

1. Those courses which are offered at Massachusetts State 
College. 

2. Those courses which are not offered at Massachusetts 
State College. Beside the names of these courses are 
listed the number of colleges that include these 
courses in their curricula. 



1. English 



I. 



Ar gument at ion 

Art of Writing (Creative Writing) 

Composition 

Library Science or Research 

Literature 

Public Speaking 



2. Education 

3. Art 



Appendix B -18- 

4. Modern Languages 

French 
German 
Spanish 

5. History and Government 

6. Music 

7. Psychology 

8. Philosophy 
9 » Economics 

10 o Sociology 

11, Religion 

12. Orientation 

13 o Home Economics 

14. Mathematics 

15. Physical Education 

16. Hygiene 

17. Sciences, 

Astronomy 

Bacteriology 

Botany 

Chemistry 

Entomology 

Geology 

Physics 

Physiology 

Zoology 

18. Ethics 

19. Political Science 

II. 

I. Art 

Formative Art 1 College 

Graphic and Plastic Arts 1 College 



4 



( 



/ Appendix B -19- 



# 



f 



£. Kis-cory and Government 



Contemporary Civilization— —2 colleges 
Citizenship——! college 

Occidental Civilization -1 college 

American Institutions — — 1 college 

3. Ancient Languages 

Latin— — • — —20 colleges 
Greek-— 20 colleges 

The outstanding courses that are lacking at the Massachusetts State 
College are Latin and Greek. These courses, however, are not 
necessary for the A.B. degree. In numerous Colleges Mathematics may 
be elected in place of either Latin or Greek. 

Massachusetts State College, granting the B.S. degree, has in its 
curriculum every subject that is necessary in order to receive the 
A.B. degree. A graduate of M.S.C. who has majored in the department 
of Languages and Literature, and who receives a B.S. degree upon 
graduation, has completed a course of study that is equivalent 
(and in many cases identical) to the course of study that a person 
receiving the A.B. degree has completed. 



Appendix B -20- 



Report to the Trustees of Student Committee on the 

A.B. Degree 

The following discussion is from an address by Dr. Goldberg 
of the faculty to the Essex County Alumni in Danvers, November, 1935, 
We feel that it expresses more fully than any material of our committee 
the "fundamental error" of those who oppose the degree on grounds of 
practicality . 

There are those who maintain that nowadays the line of 
demarcation between the courses leading to the Bachelor of Science 
degree and those leading to the Arts degree is becoming less and less 
distinct , and that it therefore does not make much difference whether 
a student is graduated with the A.B. degree or with the B.S. degree, 
since educators themselves are often at a loss as to distinguish be- 
tween them. 

I deeply regret having to admit that many of the careless 
and uncritical educators of our day have been allowing, even en- 
couraging such a blurring of essential distinctions, and that a great 
deal of confusion has resulted. But then I have to add that I fail to 
see why our College should further this confusion. I fail to see how 
several wrongs can ever make one right. I fail to see why, because 
some colleges send out Science graduates with an A.B. degree, our 
College should perpetuate the equal and opposite error of sending out 
Arts graduates with the B.S. degree. Because other institutions are 
careless of distinctions, do we necessarily have to follow suit? Must 
we participate in a ridiculous play of the blind following the blind? 

It seems to me, on the contrary, that it would in the long 
run redound to the credit of the Massachusetts State College if it 
followed the lead set recently by the University of Iowa, and attempted 
to make each of our degrees once more mean something definite. We 
should thus preserve the integrity of our B.S. degree, which, in the 
past, has enjoyed a high reputation. And we should at the same time 
be doing an act of justice to those of our students who elect to pur- 
sue the course traditionally associated with that degree. 

There are some, on the other hand, who, admitting that there 
may be a real difference or some real differences between the two de- 
grees, answer the question, "why not call a spade a spade?" by parry- 
ing with a counter-question. They say, in effect, "My good friends, 
why are you making such a noise about the mere fact that our College, 
blinking the actual facts, awards to its students the B.S. degree when 
they should have the A.B. degree? Let f s be practical about this, you 
and I know that there is a difference or two between the degrees, or 
at least that there ought to be such differences in a well-regulated 
curriculum. But what of the layman? Don't you know that most people 
do not give a hoot as to what kind of degree you have, so long as you 
can tell them that you are a college graduate? Ana what is true of 
the public in general is true of your prospective employers. So why 
not be sensible about this? Vhat though you are given the wrong label, 
you will suffer no practical harm. On the contrary, as a supposed 



1 



$ 



ff 



Appendix B -21- 



Bachelor of Science, you may gain: you may land a job which would 
not be yours if it were known that you were an ii.B. man." 

Of course, there are several answers to such an appeal to 
the "practical." It might be pointed out that, mislabelled, the 
Arts man may be at a disadvantage when he comes to try for positions 
for which, by the course that he has taken, he has really become 
qualified. But after all, this answer would be of secondary woight. 
-What we really have posed before us here is a question of fundamental 
honesty. Even if the wrong label were to the advantage of the Arts 
man, ought the College for a moment encourage such misrepresentation 
simply because it may possibly be expedient, even though it involves 
actual falseness? 

I hardly think that any Alumnus who has the reputation of 
the College at heart would admit that the damage to the integrity of 
the College was worth the possible petty gain to be derived therefrom 
by individual students. The net result of such a practice is to 
cheapen the student in his own eyes, to degrade the course he has 
taken, to impair the integrity of our B.S. degree, and to cheapen the 
reputation an d character of the whole College . 

Finally, there are those who, in answer to the question, 
"Why not call a spade a spade?", say: "My good friends, it is not 
enough that you show that the Arts graduates of our College are being 
mislabelled as Bachelors of Science. You must go further and show 
that they have been handicapped thereby, and further even than that, 
that they would be aided to positions if they did have the Arts degree." 

, Now, I do think that it would help the cause of the Arts de- 
gree at the Massachusetts State College if a few striking illustrations 
of such handicap wore compiled and publicized. But I do not admit, for 
a moment, that the advocates of the iirts degree must, as a primary task, 
demonstrate handicap to our Arts men, before they can claim a. 
favorable hearing for their cause. The burden of proof, in this whole 
question, rests with those who would deny the Arts degree to our stu- 
dents who have qualified for that aegree. It is they who have to show 
why the degree of Bachelor of Arts ought nojt to be granted to such stu- 
dents. It is enough for the advocates of the degree to show that an 
error is being perpetuated from year to year, that this error is bad 
for the students who are mislabelled as a result of it, and for the 
College which sanctions it. It is a sore spot in the body of the 
College. It ought to be cured. 



I ) 



* 



i 






■"- — 



j Appendix B 



-22- 



Statement by A. Anderson Mackimmie 
Head of Department of History and Sociology 

The B..i. and the B.S. degrees are used as appropriate de- 
grees for a "general" college course. For years Amherst College 
granted both. Now she has reduced them to one , the B.A. The B.S« 
degree seems to connote specialization. However it has been used 
here from our beginnings as the "general" degree. 

There are two conditions which, if fulfilled, would seem to 
call for the granting of a B.A. degree at our college: first, that 
students come to us asking for a "general" college training, rather 
than a vocational or specialized course; second , that the college can 
or does offer a sufficient number of courses in such subjects as 
languages and literature, history and philosophy as would be equivalent 
to courses in other state colleges leading to the B.A. degree. 

With regard to the first condition, we have had such students 
for a long time. Under the old major system (based on vocations) 
these students majored in "Agricultural Education" because in that 
major they were able to elect the humanitarian subjects. Under the 
present organization of the course of study, they now major in Social 
Sciences, and, in their senior and junior years, they specialize in 
the departments of "Languages and Literature," and "History and 
a Sociology." 

In the class of 1937 there were 9 majoring in Hist, and Soc. 
it it n if 1938 " are 15 " " " " " 
" " " " 1939 " are 12 " " " " " 

The enrollment of students in courses in History and Sociology 
this semester is: 

209 
36 
82 
38 
45 
24 
14 
55(religion)43 

Students coming to us for preparation for the professional 
schools, especially the law schools, are recommended to major in the 
humanities and to give particular attention to the broader, cultural 
subjects. They already anticipate that a B.A. degree will be required 
for entrance to the best Law Schools and for admittance to the Bar 
examinations. 

For some time then we have had students who pursued a course 
of study that should have %he B.A. as the appropriate degree. Very 
f little expansion in courses, if any, will be necessary to shape a 
curriculum comparable to that of the B.A. in other state colleges. 
For these reasons I wish to support the petition of certain students 
and alumni to our Board of Trustees to grant the B.A. degree to 
qualified students. 



Hist. 


1 


w 


25 


tt 


31 


n 


53 


if 


61 


n 


65 


tt 


75 


it 


RR 



OC 


. 51 


5 


tt 


53 


10 


tt 


75 


13 


ft 


77 


4 


tt 


79 


6 



« 



(- 



( 



Appendix C 



• 



Statement Prepared and Presented by 
Professor Frank Prentice Rand, Head 
of the Department of Languages and 
Literature, before the Trustee 
Committee on Faculty and Program of 
Study, December 14, 1937. 

To the Trustee Committee on Faculty and Course of Study: 

The department most nm«erously concerned in the 
matter of tta Bachelor of Arts degree is that of 



in which 
of whom 

and 



54 
21 
55 
51 



LANGUAGES AND LITERATURE 
juniors and seniors are now majoring, 

are men, 

have indicated that they hope to teach, 

have taken Latin or Greek in secondary 
school for an average of 3.5 years. 



1 ) 



These students all desire, and g^J*^*^ 0118 
would ^candidates for the Bachelor /^ s ss ^f a f « rg Lcy 
prospective teachers it * s * ^"5:°* § Q certainly diserimi- 

and Bachelors of Arts. 
For example; 

Tas t sarin? a freshman with a scholastic average of 
92.3 per cenf uKooS to transfer to Harvard ana received 
this reply: 

..The Committee on Admission regret very 
much to inform you that you cannot ^admitted 
to Harvard hy transfer to any s *^ingon the 
basis of work completed in the Massachusetts 
State College even though that institution 
does give instruction in academic subjects. 
Tne Comlittee admit by transfer only from 
colleges of liberal aris." 

Last winter a sophomore conferr ed*tth»e ab out trans- 
ferring to Mt. Holyoke Her high scnool P*g°£*£ pB) £ a d 
SaVer STshe^ouirnrhoSloTet a position as a teacher 
of English without an Arts degree. 



# 



c 



( 



Appendix C -2- 

Our most promising English major two years ago, who 
has since given up the idea of teaching, told me that one prin- 
cipal said to him that he would hire him in a minute as a 
teacher of science but under no circumstances as a teacher of 
English. 



In view of this handicap it is perhaps a compliment 
to our undergraduate instruction that I have in my files the 
names of thirty-seven alumni who are now teaching English, ten 
of them in colleges and universities. 

In 1934 I asked those who at that time made up this 
group whether they personally had experienced a professional 
handicap because of their Science degree. Of the twenty-one 
who replied twelve said that they had, and six implied that 
they would have had were it not for their M.A. ! s and Ph.D. { s 
from other institutions. 



That our students are receiving creditable instruction 
in languages and literature is suggested hy these facts; 

that since 1950 five of them have been awarded Ph.D.'s 
in English from Harvard, £ale, Cornell and Minnesota; 

that last spring two of our alumni were offered English 
ins true tor ships by Amherst and Williams; 

that during the last three years our department has con- 
tributed a larger proportion of the membership of the 
scholastic honorary society, Phi Kappa Phi, (18 per cent) 
than any other department, and a larger proportion of 
those taking departmental honors (24 per cent) . 



In the interest of our fifty-four major students, 
therefore, we earnestly request a sympathetic hearing to the 
advocates of the Bachelor of Arts degree. 



# 



( 






Appendix D 

A Summary of Reolies to Questionnaire sent to 
certain colleges in November 1937 and presented 
r h Tr^stet Committee on Faculty and Program 
of Study, December 14, 1937 by Dean William L. 
Machmer . 

The following questions were asked: 

1. What degrees are granted at your College? 

2 Is it possible for students in the College 
of Agriculture to receive the A.B.' degree? 

S. mat are the essential differences In the 
requirements for the A.B. degree and the 
B.S. degree? 

4. In what respect do the entrance requirements 
for the two degrees (B.S. and A.B.) differ? 

5 Is the A.B. degree limited to students in 
" particular colleges, divisions or depart- 
ments? Please enumerate. 

6. Is there any difference in the charge to 
candidates for the two degrees? 



# 












Appendix D 



-2- 



k 



COLLEGES 


Degrees 
Granted 


Eligible 

Begr 


Conn. State 


A.B. & B.S. 


No 


Cornell 


A.B. & B*S«. 


No 


Georgia Univ. 


A.B. & B.S. 


No 


Maine 


A.B. & B.S, 


No 


Michigan State 


J1 i- J. » C<C JiJtUi< 


No 


Univ. of N.H. 


A.B. & B.S. 


No 


Penn. State 


A.B. & B.S, 


No 


Rhode Island 
State 


B • S . only 


No 


Rutgers 


A.B. & B.S. 
and B.Litt. 


No 


So. Dakota St. 


B.S. 


No 


Univ. of Vt. 


A.B. & B.S. 


No 


Va. Polytechnic 
Institute 


B.S. 


No 



Are Agricultural. 

students Departments 

'or A.B, to which 

Degree? A.B, i s limited 

WI.<W— P*> «fc r »IMi «»'>— WKtBff.**!!!— I IIIIIIIIIT I I !■■!■■■ Mil II IIIIIWllll Wl— I Mil* III 



Division of Arts & 
Sciences and Teacher- 
Training 

Arts & Sciences 

* . 

Arts & Sciences and 
Education & Journalism 

Arts & Sciences and in 
Education (B.S. or A.B.) 

Liberal Arts Division 

Liberal Arts 
(Depts. named) 

Education, Commerce & 
Finance , Journalism, 
Arts & Letters 

See Pres. Bressler's 
letter 

College of Arts & 
Sciences , College for 
V'omen, Journalism 
(B. Litt.) 



College of Arts only 



* 



r 



/ 



•) 



Appendix «E 






o « 




Notes fo" discussion submitted by Commissioner 
RearLn and presented by Mr. Thomas Phelan at 
?ne meeting of the Trustee Committee on Faculvy 
and Program of Study, December 14, 195 7. 

1. Economically unsound at the P^fent t im e bee ause of 
physical make-up of your institution. J^is »dde d 

colleges into existence. 

This coUeee has attracted those who wished to become 
specialist to the technical principles and practices 
J- the art I and industry. The granting of an a.B. 
dLree might tend to dilute this attractiveness ana 
convince many that expansion was the greatest desire 
of this famous college, 
m this era of economic disa s the salvation of 

tate our land productive values. 
i. For generations to come Naders in all walks of 

5S U S ? pesVfTeSef are* conferred here the tradi- 

tions of this institution and its Value to the a b n 
cuituralist will never be overshadowed. 

3 The danger to sacrifice the high standards of your 
nrlsent degrees and their distinguished qualities i. 
?oo paramount for this so-called "open sesane-to pro- 
fessionai schools. Other institutions ox xearnin b .re 
and ii?l continue to offer this degree without 
sacrificing any of their traditions. 

7, niat library facilities have you? 



\ 



\ 



( 



Appendix F 



Enrollment by divisional majors in the under- 
graduate college since 1929 presented by Dean 
William L. Machmer at the meeting of the 



Study j 


December 14, 1937. 




* * V &* V**** N. 










1928- 


1929 




% 




5fear 


















Class 


19 


193 


19J 


1932 


Total 




M 


W 


M 


W 


M 


W 


M W 


M W 


Agric 


11 


2 


15 





10 


1 


* 


36 3 


Hort 


27 


5 


36 


4 


36 


7 




99 16 


Home E. 




1 




5 




10 




16 


P & B 


19 


3 


27 


6 


34 


3 




80 12 


Soc.Sci. 


26 


12 


£g 


lg 


25 


10 




83 34 




83 


23 


110 


27 


105 


31 




298 Si 


Year 






1929- 


1930 








Class 


1930 


1931 


1932 


1933 


Total 




M 


m 


M 


W 


M 


W 


M r 


M W 


Agric 


14 





9 


1 


13 





— * — 


36 I 


Hort 


30 


3 


28 


3 


26 


2 




84 8 


Home E. 




5 




10 




9 




24 


P & B 


19 


7 


21 


4 


49 


13 




89 24 


Soc.Sci. 


29 


14 


37 


12 


SS 


13 




98 39 




92 


29 


95 


30 


120 


37 




307 96 



*Did not select major group until sophomore year. 



• i 



ik_ 



Year 


1931 


1 


1930- 


1931 


333 


1934 




Class 


.932 


1< 


Total 


Agric 


M 
6 





M 

Son 

14 


W 



11 

■• — * 

16 


W 



M 
21 


1 


M W 
57 1 


Hort 


21 


3 


24 





28 


2 


37 


3 


110 8 


Home E. 




9 




12 




10 




22 


53 


P & B 


17 


3 


42 


10 


48 


11 


85 


15 


192 39 


Soc.Sci. 


33 


12 


30 


14 


28 


14 


22 


17 


113 57 




W 


2? 


110 


36 


120 


37 


165 


58 


472 158 


Year 








1931- 


1932 










Class 


1932 


1933 


1934 


1935 


Total 


Agric 


M 
12 





M 

14 





M 
9 


W 

1 


M 
16 


W 



M W 
51 1 


Hort 


20 


1 


21 


1 


26 


3 


46 


4 


113 9 


Home E. 




8 




8 




15 




29 


60 


P & B 


37 


9 


39 


13 


80 


10 


130 


26 


286 58 


Soc.Sci, 


28 


12 


28 


10 


33 


19 


22 


22 


111 62 




97 


30 


102 


32 


148 


48 


214 


81 


561 191 



Appendix 


F 






-2 


— 












year 






1932-1933 












Class 


1933 


1934 


1935 


1936 


Total 




M 


vr 


M 


W 


M 


W 


M 


W 


M 


W 


Agric 


12 





10 


1 


14 





21 


1 


57 


2 


Hort 


19 


1 


29 


2 


37 


4 


35 


4 


120 


11 


Home E. 




6 




11 




25 




24 




66 


P & B 


37 


12 


60 


9 


106 


22 


128 


21 


331 


64 


Soc.Sci, 


28 


11 


28 


20 


24 


16 


39 


33 


119 


80 




96 


30 


127 


43 


181 


67 


223 


83 


627 


223 


Year 






1933-1934 












Class 


1934 


1935 


1936 


1937 


Total 




I 


W 


M 


W 


M 


W 


M 


W 


M 


W 


Agric 


13 


1 


12 





19 


1 


20 





64 


2 


Hort 


28 


2 


36 


1 


30 


3 


26 





120 


a 


Home E. 




12 




18 




25 




31 




86 


P & B 


51 


7 


93 


20 


93 


19 


141 


21 


378 


67 


SocSci. 


g£ 


20 


S£ 


19 


£§ 


31 


42 


m, 


132 


96 




118 


42 


167 


58 


180 


79 


&(£a 


78 


694 


257 


Year 






1934-1935 












Class 


1935 


1936 


1937 


1938 


Total 




M 


w 


M 


W 


M 


• W 


M 


r 


M 


V 


Agric 


11 





14 





15 





IB 





5*5 


u 


Hort 


35 





22 


5 


25 





25 


5 


107 


10 


Home E. 




18 




27 




25 




38 




108 


P & B 


73 


18 


85 


12 


122 


17 


£33 


23 


413 


70 


SocSci- 


28 


so 


40 


28 


32 


23 


51 


30 


151 


101 


Phys.Ed. 






2 













2 







147 


56 


163 


72 


194 


65 


225 


96 


729 


289 


5fear 




- 


1935-1936 












Class 


1936 


1937 


1938 


1939 


Total 




M 


E 


M 


£ 


1 


E 


I 


E 


M 


I 


Agric 


14 





17 





10 





22 





63 





Hort 


20 


2 


17 


1 


20 


5 


16 


3 


73 


11 


Home E. 




27 




23 




32 




33 




115 


P & B 


70 


11 


95 


16 


121 


9 


146 


27 


432 


63 


Soc.Sci. 


48 


28 


46 


23 


46 


32 


54 


26 


194 


109 


Phys.Ed. 


2 





1 













3 







154 


68 


176 


63 


19? 


78 


238 


89 


765 


298 



\ 







! 



I 



-J 



r 


Appendix 


F 






-3 










• 


Year 






1936-1937 










Class 


1937 




S& 


1939 


1940 


Total 






M 


W 


M 


W 


vT 


W 


lT ~W 


M W 




Agric 


19 





28 





17 





15 1 


79 I 




Hort 


18 





16 


3 


12 


1 


12 5 


58 9 




Home E. 




22 




30 




29 


40 


121 




P & B 


85 


12 


90 


8 


123 


15 


160 21 


458 56 




Soc«Sci„ 


42 


25 


53 


32 


45 


28 


35 19 


175 104 




Phys.Ed. 


1 









3 





9 


13 






165 


59 


187 


73 


200 


73 


231 86 


783 291 




5fear 






1937-1938 










Class 


19 


38 


1939 


1940 


1941 


Total 






M 


W 


M 


W 


M 


W 


M W 


M W 




Agric 


28 





17 





8 


1 


24 T 


7? 2 




Hort 


16 


2 


21 


2 


17 


4 


19 4 


73 12 




Home E, 




27 




31 




36 


50 


144 




P & B 


79 


8 


88 


11 


132 


9 


150 30 


449 58 




Soc.-Sci. 


50 


32 


XX 


30 


39 


20 


44 27 


177 109 




Phys.Ed. 


2 





1 









4 


7 






175 


69 


171 


74 


196 


70 


241 112 


783 325 




I 



\ 










I 



TRUSTEE 



889 



THE MASSACHUSETTS AGRICULTURAL COLLEGE 






890 



THE MASSACHUSETTS AGRICULTURAL COLLEGE 



* 



TRUSTEE 



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